Press Releases

CREATIVE COMMONS TO PORT LICENSES TO MALTA

Mia Garlick, December 1st, 2005

Public discussion of adaptation of Creative Commons licenses to Malta to start in November 2005

San Francisco, CA, USA and Berlin, GERMANY — November 28, 2005 — Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative work free to share and build upon, announced today that Malta is the latest country to join its global licensing project.

Creative Commons copyright licenses, which are available free of charge from the group’s website, allow authors and artists to mark their works as free to copy or transform under certain conditions—to declare “some rights reserved,” in contrast to the traditional “all rights reserved”—thereby enabling others to access a growing pool of raw materials without legal friction.

In an effort spearheaded by Project Leads Daniele Cop and Brian Restall of Project in Motion (PiM) Creative Commons Malta plans to adapt the copyright licenses for use under Maltese law and to build local engagement with and use of Creative Commons-licensed content.

This November, Creative Commons Malta will post their initial drafts on the Creative Commons website for public discussion—participation in which is open to all.

About Project in Motion Ltd (PiM).

Projects in Motion Ltd (PiM) was set up to provide the leadership and expertise required to boost Malta’s participation in a range of European programmes and initiatives. It addresses the need expressed by local SMEs for more specific information and assistance in promoting international cooperation and networking, and in offering services related to ICTs, management, research, training and dissemination activities.

PiM’s network of experts covers areas like ICT, education, health, law, as well as cultural, scientific, environmental, agricultural and socio-economic disciplines. Through its association with other organizations, PiM strives to overcome the existing high fragmentation of resources. It brings together local players to create knowledge-intensive, multi-stakeholder partnerships possessing the critical mass needed to achieve excellence. PiM therefore aims to facilitate the transformation of local SMEs into learning organisations set to reap the benefits of the knowledge economy.

For general information, visit PiM’s website.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit the Creative Commons site

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt
Executive Director CC International
Creative Commons
Email

Mia Garlick

General Counsel & COO
Creative Commons
Email

Press Kit

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Google Advanced Search Enables CC-Customized Searching

Mia Garlick, November 4th, 2005

San Francisco, USA — November 4, 2005

Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization that provides a flexible copyright licenses for authors and artists, today announced that Google now enables filtering for Creative Commons-licensed content

Following the example of Yahoo!’s CC-search that was released in March 2004 and then incorporated into Yahoo!’s Advanced Search page, Google has incorporated a new element into its Advanced Search page that allows users to filter their search by “Usage Rights.” By choosing to search for content that “allows some form of reuse” or “can be freely modified, adapted or built upon,” search results with be limited to content that is made available under a Creative Commons license.

Creative Commons CEO & Chairman, Lawrence Lessig said “Creative Commons is thrilled by Google’s decision to join Yahoo! in enabling the spread of CC-licensed content. Now two major search engines recognize Creative Commons licenses; this confirms that CC is an important part of the infrastructure of the Internet.

Creative Commons own search page now gives site visitors the ability to search using either Google or Yahoo!.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit the Creative Commons website

Contact

Mike Linksvayer
CTO, Creative Commons
Email

Press Kit

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CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSES OFFERED IN SLOVENIA

Mia Garlick, October 28th, 2005

Silicon-Valley-based NGO reinforces its activities around the globe and introduces its innovative copyright licenses in Slovenia.

San Francisco, CA, USA and Berlin, GERMANY, Ljubljana SLOVENIA — October 28, 2005 — Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative work free to share and build upon, will launch the localization of the innovative licensing system in Slovenia as part of a four day Festival of Creativity and Free Culture.

Creative Commons copyright licenses are available free of charge from the group’s website. The licenses allow authors and artists to mark their works as free to copy or transform under certain conditions—to declare “some rights reserved,” in contrast to the traditional “all rights reserved”—thereby enabling others to access a growing pool of raw materials without legal friction.

Staff at Creative Commons’ offices in San Francisco and Berlin worked with Project Lead Maja Bogataj Jančič, from the Intellectual Property Institute, and Špela Kučan of Ljubljana Digital Media Lab LJUDMILA, who supervised the technical team, to adapt the standardized licenses to Slovenian law.

The licenses will be launched as part of the Festival of Creativity and Free Culture in Ljubljana, which is honored to have the support of Dr. Janez Drnovšek, the President of the Republic of Slovenia. The festival will include an international legal seminar, hosted by Open Society Institute, on October 28 during which Lawrence Lessig, Chairman & CEO of Creative Commons, will give a lecture titled “Should Copyright Include the Exclusive Right to Copy?” The lecture coincides with the promotion of the Slovenian translation of Lessig’s book “Free Culture.”

The localized version of CC licensing system will be unveiled at the CC Launch on Saturday October 29. The launch will consist of performances of world renown violinist Maja Cerar and the duet Random Logic, who will perform a piece by composer and computer musician Douglas Geers. Greers’ pieice “Obsessive Currents”, which is CC licensed, was itself inspired by the public domain works of Bach and Ysaÿe. During the launch, the CC-licensed work of other local artists will also be showcased. Project leads from other Creative Commons teams in Brazil, Italy and Croatia will attend the launch together with Chairman & CEO Lawrence Lessig.

Read more about the Festival program

.

About Intellectual Property Institute

The Intellectual Property Institute (IPI) is a research, academic and training institution in the field of intellectual property law. It was founded in 2004 and is the first institution of its kind in Slovenia. The Institute conducts research, provides education and offers training opportunities in the field of intellectual property law. The primary focus of its activities is to explore the challenges that digitalization has brought to intellectual property law and are important for the progress of an information-based society. The Institute aims to work in close cooperation with Slovenian universities, research institutions, industry, art centers and civil society groups. Its objective is to create a strong network of partnership with researchers and research institutions at home and abroad. Since its recent founding, the Institute has participated in many discussions regarding various intellectual property issues, and managed to mark the landscape of the debate with its perspective.
For more information visit the IPI website or contact Maja Bogataj Jančič.

More about LJUDMILA

LJUDMILA – Ljubljana Digital Media Lab, founded by a group of new media artists and activists living and working in Ljubljana in 1994, has extensive experience connecting new media technologies and artistic projects as well as encouraging broader, savvier and more creative uses of new technologies. Initially funded by the OSI-Slovenia Internet program, Ljudmila has grown into a well-equipped digital media lab that focuses on digital production as well as education, research and development of open standards software. It also provides knowledge, equipment, Internet access, web sites, electronic publishing and other affordable networking services to non-governmental and non-profit organizations, art collectives, active individuals, and others. Ljudmila operates through Culture & Arts Centre KUD France Prešeren.

For more information visit the LJUDMILA website or contact Špela Kučan.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit the group’s website.

Contact

Maja Bogataj Jančič

Director, Intellectual Property Institute

Email

Christiane Asschenfeldt

Executive Director iCommons, Creative Commons

Email

Mia Garlick

General Counsel, Creative Commons

Email

Presskit in English

Presskit in Slovenian

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CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSES LAUNCH IN ARGENTINA

Mia Garlick, October 2nd, 2005

Silicon-Valley-based NGO reinforces its activities around the globe

San Francisco, CA, USA and Berlin, GERMANY — October 1, 2005 — Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative work free to share and build upon, today unveils a localized version of its innovative licensing system in Argentina.

Creative Commons copyright licenses are available free of charge from the group’s website. The licenses allow authors and artists to mark their works as free to copy or transform under certain conditions—to declare “some rights reserved,” in contrast to the traditional “all rights reserved”—thereby enabling others to access a growing pool of raw materials without legal friction.

Staff at Creative Commons’ offices in San Francisco and Berlin worked with Project Leads Professor Ariel Vercelli and Professor Pablo Palazzi to adapt the standardized licenses to Argentinean law. The Creative Commons Argentina project team is supported by the Fundación OSDE, and the nonprofit NGO Bienes Comunes.

Today the Argentinean versions of the Creative Commons licenses will be launched in Buenos Aires, at a ceremony held at the Centro Cultural General San Martín (Sarmiento 1551, Sala D, 12:00 AM). As part of the launch event, Professor Lawrence Lessig (Chairman and CEO of Creative Commons) and Professor Ariel Vercelli, (Chairman of Bienes Comunes and Project Lead of the Creative Commons team in Argentina) will give lectures that will be webcast live.

About Fundación OSDE

Fundación OSDE is a non-profit organization in Argentina, founded in 1991 with the purpose of promoting activities in the fields of culture, education, health, economy, law and policies. Combining freedom and creativity. The mission of Fundación OSDE is based on the belief that there are ethical principles and values such as truth, freedom, integrity, solidarity, transparency, loyalty and excellence that have been and are still present in the Argentinean vision for the future.

For general information, visit the the website of Fundación OSDE.

About Bienes Comunes

Bienes Comunes is a non-profit association founded in 2005 and located in Buenos Aires. Its mission is the study, research, promotion, improvement and protection of the commons. Bienes Comunes intends to work as a hub between diverse networks (private, public and community) interested in the protection and regulation of the cultural, physical, digital and biological commons.

For general information, visit their website.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit the Creative Commons website.

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt
Executive Director iCommons, Creative Commons

Email

Mia Garlick

General Counsel, Creative Commons
Email

Ariel Vercelli (Buenos Aires)

Project Lead, Creative Commons Argentina
President, NGO Bienes Comunes

Email

Press Kit

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CREATIVE COMMONS SUPPORTING WE’RE NOT AFRAID COMMUNITY MOVEMENT

Raul, August 1st, 2005

San Francisco, US, & London, UK, 1st August 2005—Creative Commons and www.werennotafraid.com (WNA) today announced a landmark partnership whereby WNA will incorporate Creative Commons licensing into the WNA site, upcoming Proud Gallery exhibit and the ‘We’re Not Afraid’ book. By using the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 license, people around the world will be able to legally copy, redistribute and adapt the images that are made available (provided that they make any adaptations available under the same license terms).

“By joining with Creative Commons, We’re Not Afraid is able to give anyone in the world access to the incredible, ever-growing content that makes up the site. So far we have more than 6000 images online and more than 25,000 waiting to be added to the site, as well as numerous songs, poems, movies, and statements that have been submitted by our visitors sharing their own artistic representations on terrorism in the world,” said Alfie Dennen, WNA founder. “With a Creative Commons license, we can give the world this amazing resource without risking the rights of its creators.”

WNA developed as an offshoot of MoblogUK, Europe’s most successful moblogging site and the site responsible for posting the first ever images of the devastating effects of the 7th July London train bombings.

To date, www.werenotafraid.com has received more than 25,000 image submissions as well as countless multimedia submissions including music, video, and written pieces all of which are licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Sharelike 2.0 license.

The world community has been contributing a diverse range of content to the site; images showing personal views of the events such as:

click here

As well as original and quality recordings such as this track, by Chris and John Mendelsohn:

click here.

Since its inception, the site has had over 20 million hits.

Based on the web site, the WNA Exhibition at Proud Central will launch on the 8th of September 2005 and will present a complete picture of terrorism and its effects. From stark images of terror-ravaged areas ranging from New York to Bali, to the fearless, inspired creations of WNA’s visitors, the exhibit will promote the unity of a global community that defies religion, colour, creed, or country. Through the use of Creative Commons licensing on many of the images included in the Exhibition, visitors will be able to request images from the exhibition to be delivered digitally free of charge.

Currently in the planning stages, the ‘We’re Not Afraid’ book will be a collection of the most representative images submitted to www.werenotafraid.com. interspersed with texts taken from the world’s religious and philosophical works. With its book, WNA intends to show that no matter our beliefs or backgrounds, we are all one people who need only be given a voice to be united. All images and original works used in the book will be made available using Creative Commons licensing.

About We’re Not Afraid

We’re Not Afraid is a UK not-for-profit organisation through which a global community can speak out against the acts of terror that have struck London, Madrid, New York, Baghdad, Bazra, Tikrit, Gaza, Tel-Aviv, Egypt, Afghanistan, Bali, and against terrorist activity occurring in cities around the world each and every day.

About Creative Commons

A US nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit Creative Commons

Contact

  • Wendy Brierley
  • Account Director
  • Idea Generation
  • wendy@ideageneration.co.uk
  • Tel: 020.7428.4949
  • Neeru Paharia
  • Executive Director
  • Creative Commons
  • neeru@creativecommons.org
  • Tel: 415.946.3068
  • Press Kit

    here

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CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSES OFFERED IN CHILE

Raul, July 8th, 2005

Silicon-Valley-based NGO reinforces its activities around the globe

San Francisco, CA, USA and Berlin, GERMANY — July 1, 2005 — Creative
Commons, a nonprofit organization dedicated to building a body of creative
work free to share and build upon, announced today the launch of the Creative
Commons project in Chile.

Creative Commons copyright licenses are available free of charge from the
group’s website (http://creativecommons.org). The licenses allow authors and artists to mark their works as free to copy or transform under certain conditions—to declare “some rights reserved,” in contrast to the traditional “all rights reserved”—thereby enabling others to access a growing pool of raw materials without legal friction.

In a collaborative effort between the University of Chile and the Chilean NGO
Corporacion Derechos Digitales (CDD), Creative Commons Chile adapted the
licenses for use under Chilean law—a process headed by project leads Professor
Alberto Cerda Silva, Gabriela Oruzar and Claudio Ruiz.

“We hope to encourage discussion about the relevance and convenience of a
balanced copyright for the artistic creations,“ says Claudio Ruiz. “In our
developing countries, the discussion about copyright and its limitations and
exemptions must be part of the public agenda. “

About the University of Chile and the Corporacion Derechos Digitales (CDD)

The University of Chile is, with its 162 years of existence, the oldest national
university in Chile. It consists of 14 Schools and 4 Interdisciplinary Institutes.
Research and creation of new knowledge is a main focus of this leading
institution.

For more information, visit University of Chile and University of Chile Library and Information Services

CDD is a Chilean NGO founded in 2003. It is an independent, non-profit
organization, located in Santiago de Chile, whose mission is to promote the respect and protection of human rights in the digital environment. Its volunteer members, from a wide range of professions related to information technologies, focus on subjects like protection of privacy or legal aspects on the use and development of free software.

For more information about Corporación Derechos Digitales, visit
CDD

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the
creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the
public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the
generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and
Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the
Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit Creative Commons

Contact

  • Claudio Ruiz (Santiago)
  • Director International Affairs, Derechos Digitales
  • claudio@derechosdigitales.org
  • Neeru Paharia (San Francisco)
  • Assistant Director, Creative Commons
  • neeru@creativecommons.org
  • Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
  • iCommons Executive Director, iCommons
  • christiane@creativecommons.org

Press Kit here

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CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSES OFFERED IN ISRAEL

Mia Garlick, June 26th, 2005

Silicon-Valley-based NGO reinforces its activities around the globe and introduces its innovative copyright licenses in Israel

San Francisco, CA, USA and Berlin, GERMANY — June 9, 2005 — Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization that provides an alternative to full copyright, today unveils a localized version of its innovative licensing system in Israel.

Creative Commons’ copyright licenses, which are available free of charge from the group’s website, allow authors and artists to mark their works as free to copy or transform under certain conditions—to declare “some rights reserved,” in contrast to the traditional “all rights reserved”—thereby enabling others to access a growing pool of raw materials without legal friction.

With Israel introducing a Creative Commons license tailored for the specifics of the legal system in Israel, the number of countries where Creative Commons’ tools and licenses are available rises to a total of 19. The organization already provides copyright licenses specific to Australian, Austrian, Brazilian, Belgian, Canadian, Croatian, Dutch, English & Welsh, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Polish, U.S., Taiwanese and Spanish law, thanks to a global network of artists, lawyers, and technologists.

Staff at Creative Commons´offices in San Francisco and Berlin worked with Dr. Michael Birnhack, co-director of the Haifa Center of Law & Technology (HCTL) and Project Leads Elad Wieder and Ohad Mayblum of the HCTL to adapt the standardized licenses for use in Israel.

Today the licenses will be launched during a ceremony at the HCLT in the Faculty of Law, University of Haifa. As part of the event at the Hecht Auditorium, Professor Lawrence Lessig, Chairman & CEO of Creative Commons will give a live video-conference lecture. In addition, a variety of works by Israeli artists that are using Creative Commons licenses will be exhibited – a body of creative work free to share and build upon. “ We are very honored and excited to be collaborating with the Haifa Center of Law & Technology. Being able to offer our licenses in Israel, a country of great creativity and dynamism means a lot to our organization” said Professor Lawrence Lessig.

About The Haifa Center of Law & Technology

The Haifa Center of Law & Technology (HCLT) is a research center based at the Faculty of Law, University of Haifa, Israel. The HCLT promotes research in fields of Law & Technology, Intellectual Property, Information Law and related areas. The HCLT’s activities date back to 1999, and in 2003 it was approved as a University Center by the Haifa University authorities. HCLT conducts workshops and conferences, awards fellowships and holds writing competitions for students. HCLT cooperates with several leading institutions in Israel and elsewhere, including George Washington University Law School, WIPO, The Center of the Study of the Information Society and other institutions.

For general information, visit HCLT’s website

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit Creative Commons’ website

Contact

Elad Wieder (Haifa)

Coordinator, Haifa Center of Law & Technology

Email

Neeru Paharia (San Francisco)
Executive Director, Creative Commons
Email

Press Kit

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Leaders in Intellectual Property and Open Content from All Corners of the Globe Participating in Inaugural International Creative Commons Conference

Raul, June 24th, 2005

Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA—June 24, 2005

Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization that provides flexible
copyright licenses for authors and artists, is holding a conference
at Harvard Law School over the coming weekend of June 25 and 26,
2005, for all of its international collaboration partners, who are
responsible for the legal ‘porting’ of the Creative Commons
licenses and building community around the licenses.

Representatives from 37 countries in Africa, the Americas, Asia,
Australia, Europe, and the Middle East will be coming together to
discuss a wide range of topics, including the experience of the
Creative Commons’ collaboration partners in ‘porting’ the Creative
Commons licenses in their local jurisdiction and their experience
in terms of the local adoption of the Creative Commons licenses. In
addition, the conference will serve as a forum to discuss global
issues faced by Creative Commons and its collaboration partners
including moral rights and collecting societies.

Creative Commons began its internationalization project in 2003. To
date, Creative Commons licenses are available in 20 different
jurisdictions with another 11 jurisdictions actively in the process
of ‘porting.’ Porting involves translating the licenses
linguistically as well as legally so that the licenses are
customized for the requirements of the specific jurisdiction. In
total, Creative Commons is in talks with representatives from 70
different jurisdictions.

Christiane Asschenfeldt, Executive Director of iCommons, Creative
Commons’ legal porting project, said: “After two years of online
collaboration it will be great for all of us to eventually meet in
person to discuss the issues facing Creative Commons and our
experiences in implementing the licenses.”

Executive Director of Creative Commons’ international community
building project, Paula Le Dieu said: “This event marks the start
of Creative Commons as a truly international organization as it
gathers together for the first time the incredible group of people
that have been responsible for the growth and success of Creative
Commons as a global phenomenon.“

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes
the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether
owned or in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences.
It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the
Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation,
the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit Creative Commons

Contact

  • Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
  • christiane@creativecommons.org
  • Paula Le Dieu (London)
  • paula@creativecommons.org
  • Press Kit here

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‘Leaders of the Free World’ finally able to sing “Happy Birthday to You” to the Free Culture Movement after rights to song cleared

Raul, June 21st, 2005

San Francisco, USA, June 21, 2005:

Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization that provides flexible
copyright licenses for authors and artists, released today its long-
awaited present to the Free Culture Movement, represented primarily
by FreeCulture.org, which celebrated its first birthday on April 23,
2005. The present is a recording of “Happy Birthday to You” by some
of the ‘leaders of the free world’–meaning some of the leaders in the
free culture, free software and open source software movements. The
present is now offered to the world from Creative Commons’ site in
exchange for donations to pay the licensing fees of 8.5 cents per
download, with the rest of the donations going to support the Free
Culture Movement.

The Free Culture Movement was formed at Swarthmore College,
Swarthmore, PA, by more than 100 students. These students were
organized by a group who sued Diebold and won, after Diebold sent a
cease and desist letter to the Swarthmore university administrator
alleging violations of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Faced
with such grave accusations, the university administrator shut down
the students’ website–that is, until they won the right to have it
reinstated. A year later, there are nine chapters across the country,
and more brewing around the world.

In keeping with tradition, Creative Commons wanted to sing “Happy
Birthday” to the Free Culture Movement and help the Free Culture
Movement on its way with donations by those supportive of its cause.
Because “Happy Birthday” is still under copyright, however, to do so,
Creative Commons needed to get a license.

The American Composers, Authors and Publishers directed Creative
Commons–because it wished to only make a single download–to Warner
Chappell Music. Warner, after discussing license terms and quoting an
applicable license fee, refused to grant a license and directed
Creative Commons to Harry Fox. Finally, through Harry Fox, Creative
Commons was able to obtain a license and sing “Happy Birthday” in
public to the Free Culture Movement, somewhat belatedly given the
delay in securing the necessary rights.

The song is now available for download and donations are welcome to
help cover the licensing fees and to assist the Free Culture Movement
click here. Performing the
song are the designated ‘leaders of the free world’–The Staff of
EFF”, Mitch Kapor, Dan Gillmor, Brian Behlendorf, Ian Clarke, Jimmy
Wales, Brewster Kahle, and Gigi Sohn.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes
the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works–whether owned
or in the public domain–by empowering authors and audiences. It is
sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public
Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the
Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit here

Contact

  • Neeru Paharia
  • Executive Director, Creative Commons
  • neeru at creativecommons.org
  • 415.946.3068

Press Kit here

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openDemocracy’s Global Network of Writers Adopts Creative Commons Licenses

Raul, June 15th, 2005

San Francisco, USA & London, UK – June 14, 2005>

Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization that provides flexible
copyright licenses for authors and artists, and openDemocracy.net, an
independent online magazine for debate about global politics, today unveiled a new
partnership to bring works by the world’s leading scholars and writers into the
global commons.

openDemocracy.net is the first online publisher of its size and caliber to adopt
Creative Commons licensing. Starting today, members of the public will be free to
republish most articles on the openDemocracy.net site in any non-commercial publication in
the world. “This move embodies the democratic values we champion,” says openDemocracy’s
editor Isabel Hilton.

Since 2001 openDemocracy.net has published more than 2,600 articles by
writers from around the world on issues relating to democracy, politics and
culture. Contributors include scholars, journalists, policymakers and
politicians. openDemocracy.net today released the work of 150 existing authors
under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives license. All
future authors will be encouraged to publish their work under this new default
license, although they will also be free to opt for traditional “All rights
reserved” level of copyright, or an even more permissive Creative Commons
license instead.

Chairman & CEO of Creative Commons, Lawrence Lessig, said “It is exciting
that the important content published in openDemocracy will be able
to freely circulate around the globe and assist in spreading the ideas and
arguments of its contributors. Creative Commons is honored that openDemocracy
felt that Creative Commons licenses were suitable for this purpose.”

About openDemocracy.net

openDemocracy was founded in London in 2001. Its authors span the
globe, and include some of the most respected writers and scholars from across
the political spectrum. Past contributors include Todd Gitlin, Mary
Kaldor, Kofi Annan, Anne-Marie Slaughter, John le Carré, Ian McEwan, and Siva
Vaidhyanathan. Visit: opendemocracy

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the
creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or
in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained
by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and
Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.
For general information, visit Creative Commons

Contact

Solana Larsen, openDemocracy New York Editor +1 646 220-1459
solana.larsen@openDemocracy.net

Neeru Paharia, Creative Commons Executive Director +1 415 946-3068
neeru@creativecommons.org

Press Kit: here

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