Press Releases

Creative Commons Poised for New Growth Phase with Key New Hires and Expansion into Science

Matt Haughey, November 10th, 2004

The Silicon Valley nonprofit takes on
new personnel as it prepares to explore a Science Commons, continue its
rapid international expansion, and build upon the precocious success of
its first two years.

SAN FRANCISCO,
USA November 10, 2004 Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to
expanding the range of creative and intellectual works free to share
and build upon, today announced the creation of two new staff positions
as the organization makes the transition from meteoric start-up to
online institution and begins applying its model to scientific research.

Silicon
Valley veteran Mark Resch joins Creative Commons as its overall Chief
Executive Officer, while entrepreneur and metadata expert John Wilbanks
joins as the Executive Director of Science Commons, a newly formed
branch of the organization.

Creative Commons’ long-time core
staff, led by Executive Director Glenn Otis Brown, Assistant Director
Neeru Paharia, and international affairs directors Christiane
Asschenfeldt and Roland Honekamp, will continue on in more specialized
versions of their roles. Under this leadership team, the number of web
pages carrying Creative Commons copyright licenses has grown from zero,
in December 2002, to around five million today. The nonprofit now
offers its free legal tools in nine different languages, with around
three dozen more translations in draft. The organization’s most recent
accomplishments include the sampling- and copying-friendly licensing of
the WIRED CD, a 16-track album featuring the
Beastie Boys, David Byrne, and other top artists, as well as the debut
of a unique semantic-web search engine, which now ships with Mozilla’s
industry-leading browser, Firefox 1.0.

“In just two years,
Brown and Paharia have led the Creative Commons team from the basement
of Stanford Law School to the cover of WIRED,”
said Lawrence Lessig, chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law
at Stanford, referring to the November issue of the magazine. “As the
new overall CEO, Resch brings a specific and
crucial skill-set to Creative Commons at this phase in its growth. The
core staff are now free to focus on their intense substantive workload,
while Resch will help the expanded organization become a broad and
stable movement.”

“Wilbanks’s addition as leader of the new
Science Commons branch also marks a very exciting new phase,” said
Lessig, “as the Creative Commons model is tested in unchartered areas
of intellectual endeavor.”

Mark Resch brings to the new CEO

position a wealth of experience developing successful start-up projects
into mature firms. He is chairman and co-founder of the interactive
system maker Onomy Labs, Inc. and was President and CEO of Commerce Net,
a nonprofit industry consortium that addressed critical enablers of
Internet commerce. At Xerox, Resch developed new Internet business
opportunities and managed http://xerox.com
worldwide. Resch was also co-founder and Vice President of Operations
at Luna Imaging Inc., which created large interactive photography
databases and was funded by the Getty Trust and Eastman Kodak.

Wilbanks
comes to Creative Commons from a Fellowship at the World Wide Web
Consortium in Semantic Web for Life Sciences. Previously, he founded
and led to acquisition Incellico, a bioinformatics company that built
semantic graph networks for use in pharmaceutical discovery.

Structurally,
the Creative Commons corporation will consist of three parallel
projects working in concert and overseen by Resch and chairman Lessig:

  1. Creative
    Commons the existing organization that focuses on copyright and
    cultural subject matter like music, images, and educational materials;
  2. International Commons the effort to adapt Creative
    Commons’ legal tools to various countries’ legal systems (over 50 and
    counting); and
  3. Science Commons a project to build on Creative Commons’ work in open-access scientific publishing (like MIT’s
    Open Courseware and the Public Library of Science) and apply Creative
    Commons’ voluntary “some rights reserved” approach to patents and
    scientific data.

Functionally, both Science Commons
and Creative Commons will overlap with International Commons, and
current staffers will enjoy roles that span the various sections of the
organization.

Brown, for example, who coined the phrase
“some rights reserved” to describe Creative Commons’ middle-ground
approach to copyright, will continue to coordinate messaging strategy
and act as the organization’s main staff attorney. Paharia, who
directed the development of Creative Commons one-of-a-kind search
engine and its innovative MP3-tagging protocol, among other projects, will continue to coordinate business and technology development.

Brown, anticipating Creative Commons’ rapid growth in 2004, first proposed the creation of Resch’s CEO position over a year ago.

“Our
growth has exceeded even our most optimistic expectations,” said Brown,
“but by mid-2003 it was already clear that our extremely lean team had
created a movement that would require new skill sets at various levels
of the organization. We’ve been looking forward to focusing on our
substantive legal and cultural projects full-time, and Mark Resch’s
managerial expertise will help Creative Commons further accelerate its
sustained and stable growth.”

About Creative Commons

A
nonprofit founded in early 2002, Creative Commons promotes the creative
re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the
public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by
the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D.
and Catherine T. Mac Arthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit <http://creativecommons.org>.

About Mark Resch, the new CEO of Creative Commons

Mark
Resch is deeply interested in the mutual interaction of society,
business, and technology. He is Chairman and co-founder of interactive
system maker Onomy Labs, Inc. Resch was President and CEO of Commerce Net,
a nonprofit industry consortium that addressed critical enablers of
Internet commerce. At Xerox Corporation, Resch was developed new
Internet business opportunities and managed http://xerox.com

worldwide. Resch was co-founder and Vice President of Operations at
Luna Imaging Inc., creator of large interactive photography databases,
funded by the Getty Trust and Eastman Kodak. As Vice President and
Director of Computer Imaging at CRSS Architects, Inc. Resch integrated CAD,
GIS, FM, and Visualization software to render data and space. As
Director of Graphic Arts at Computer Curriculum Corporation, Resch
supported the creation of more than 3,000 hours of interactive
courseware for students at risk. Resch was assistant professor of
Computer Art in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences at
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and drafted its MFA
degree. Resch served as co-chair for the Association for Computer
Machinery’s Special Interest Group on Computer Graphic and Interactive
Techniques (SIGGRAPH) in 1993, and has served on numerous non-profit
boards.

Resch is originally from Chicago, Illinois, and holds a BA in History from Grinnell College and an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

About John Wilbanks, Executive Director of the Science Commons

John
Wilbanks comes to Creative Commons from a Fellowship at the World Wide
Web Consortium in Semantic Web for Life Sciences. Previously, he
founded and led to acquisition Incellico, a bioinformatics company that
built semantic graph networks for use in pharmaceutical discovery.
Before founding Incellico, John was the first Assistant Director at the
Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School and also
spent time in Washington, DC, USA as a
legislative aide to U.S. Representative Fortney (“Pete”) Stark.
Wilbanks holds a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy from Tulane University.

Contact

Glenn Otis Brown (San Francisco)

Executive Director, Creative Commons
415.946.3065
glenn@creativecommons.org

Press Kit
http://creativecommons.org/presskit/

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Remix Radio Show to Debut in the Bay Area This Sunday, 2PM on KALW

Matt Haughey, October 21st, 2004

Cult radio favorite Benjamen Walker takes listeners through a novel, lawyer-free look at recombinant art.

SAN FRANCISCO, USA October 21, 2004

At 2pm this Sunday, October 24, San Francisco’s KALW
will debut a unique new radio special: “The Creative Remix,” written
and hosted by Benjamen Walker and sponsored by the nonprofit Creative
Commons, is an hour-long “lawyer free” examination of the art, culture,
and history of the remix in the broadest sense of the word. (More: http://mirrors.creativecommons.org/radio/).

The hour kicks off with a musical analysis of a familiar sort of remix: DJ Dangermouse’s
infamous mash-up of the Beatles and Jay-Z. Walker then takes listeners
back in time to check out the ancient Roman art of the poetry mash-up,
or the Cento. The show then rewinds to the 18th century to check out
the birth of copyright and how it affected writers like Alexander Pope;
and the early 20th century when the visual artist Marcel Duchamp used
the remix to reinvent everything. Walker also takes a field trip to the
Mass Mocca museum of modern art to check out the exhibit “Yankee
Remix,” where he talks to a few grad students and a pair of
curmudgeonly New England antique collectors to investigate different
attitudes towards remixing.

In the second part of the
program Walker speaks with three unique remix artists: The historical
novelist Matthew Pearl, “Walkman Buster” Gideon D’arcangelo, and Cory
Arcangel, a Nintendo hacker and one of the youngest representatives at
this year’s Whitney Biennial.

“‘The Creative Remix’ will
enlighten even the confirmed aficionado of recombinant art,” said Glenn
Otis Brown, executive director of Creative Commons. “I manage an
organization dedicated to highlighting artistic re-uses and
transformations, and I had never before thought of remixing in quite
the way Walker presents it. It’s eye-opening stuff for anyone who cares
about art and the increasingly disturbing trend of lawyers’ influencing
it.”

The show airs the same week that WIRED

magazine’s special November music issue hits newsstands. The issue will
ship with a CD with tracks by the likes of the Beastie Boys, Gilberto
Gil, David Byrne, and 13 others. Every song is covered by a Creative
Commons copyright license that invites fans to file-share the songs or
sample from them, on certain conditions. (More: http://creativecommons.org).

About Benjamen Walker

Benjamen Walker’s weekly radio program “The Theory of Everything” can be heard on WZBC
in Boston and, beginning Oct 31st, in San Francisco and on the
Internet. His previous show, “Your Radio Nightlight,” established a
cult following across the country and earned praise and awards from
several publications and other radio shows.

About Creative Commons

A
nonprofit founded in early 2002, Creative Commons promotes the creative
re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the
public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by
the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D.
and Catherine T. Mac Arthur? Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit <http://creativecommons.org>.

Glenn Otis Brown (San Francisco)

Executive Director, Creative Commons
glenn@creativecommons.org

Press Kit
http://creativecommons.org/presskit/

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Open Copyright License Discussion to Start in Belgium

Matt Haughey, October 19th, 2004

Creative Commons begins work with the
University of Namur’s cyberlaw research center to offer Belgian
versions of its “some rights reserved” copyright licenses

San Francisco, USA and Brussels, BELGIUM Oct.
19, 2004 Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of
creative work free to share and build upon, announced today its plans
to create localized Belgian versions of its free tools.

Creative Commons copyright licenses, which are available at no charge from the group’s website (http://creativecommons.org),
allow authors and artists to mark their works as free to copy or
transform under certain conditions—to declare “some rights reserved,”
in contrast to the traditional “all rights reserved”—thus eliminating
undue legal friction.

Belgium joins thirteen other nations
in the draft and comment phase of adapting the Creative Commons
licenses. Nine nations today offer localized Creative Commons licenses,
and several dozen more are in the preliminary draft phase.

In
cooperation with the Centre for Research on Computer Law (CRID) at the
University of Namur, Creative Commons has worked to adapt the copyright
licenses for use under Belgian law. CRID
intellectual property experts Séverine Dusollier, Philippe Laurent, and
Loïc Bodson have produced the French language draft, and Mélanie Carly,
a researcher at the University of Leuven’s Center for Intellectual
Rights (CIR), will publish a Dutch language draft later this month.

“We
are honored to work with these two great institutions,“ said Lawrence
Lessig, Professor at Stanford Law School and Chairman of Creative
Commons.

The Belgian drafts are available for review and public comment at <http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/be>.

“We are thrilled to be join the International Commons and to contribute in bringing it to Belgium,” said Dusollier.

About Creative Commons

A
nonprofit founded in early 2002, Creative Commons promotes the creative
re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the
public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by
the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D.
and Catherine T. Mac Arthur? Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit <http://creativecommons.org>.

About the Centre for Research on Computer Law (CRID) at the University of Namur

Founded in 1979 by Prof. Yves Poullet, the CRID, linked to the University of Namur, is a research centre dedicated to computer law and information law. The Objective of the CRID
is to foster the legal thinking in the field of cyberlaw and to create
awareness of the legal and social issues engendered by the use of new
technologies. 35 researchers are currently working on a broad range of
issues, from IPR, privacy, fundamental
rights to e-commerce, telecommunications law, use of technologies in
the medical sector, computer crime and contract law. The IPR Department is headed by Severine Dusollier.

For more information about CRID, visit .

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons

christiane@creativecommons.org

Glenn Otis Brown (San Francisco)
Executive Director, Creative Commons
glenn@creativecommons.org

Dr. Severine Dusollier (Namur)
Project Lead Belgium, CRID

severine.dusollier@fundp.ac.be

Press Kit
http://creativecommons.org/presskit/

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Creative Commons South Africa Drafts Now Available

Matt Haughey, October 19th, 2004

The innovative nonprofit pairs with
South African experts to offer localized versions of its “some rights
reserved” copyright licenses soon

SAN FRANCISCO, USA AND JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA
October 19, 2004— Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a
body of creative work free to share and build upon, announced today
that South Africa is the latest country to join its international
efforts. Creative Commons copyright licenses, which are available at no
charge from the group’s website (http://creativecommons.org),
allow authors and artists to mark their works as free to copy or
transform under certain conditions—to declare “some rights reserved,”
in contrast to the traditional “all rights reserved”—thereby enabling
others to access a growing pool of raw materials without legal
friction. South Africa joins twelve other nations in the draft phase of
adapting the Creative Commons licenses; another nine nations already
offer localized Creative Commons licenses.

Led by the Johannesburg-based LINK Centre,
Creative Commons South Africa plans to adapt the copyright licenses for
use under South African law and to build local engagement with and use
of Creative Commons-licensed content. Andrew Rens, a former lecturer at
Wits University Law School, is leading the legal aspects of the project
while Heather Ford, LINK Centre associate, directs the overall South African effort.

“South
Africa is well-placed to pioneer developments in the field of
intellectual property law,” said Ford. “Through the Treatment Action
Campaign we have had huge success in gaining access to cheaper HIV/AIDS drugs. More recently South Africa has helped to lead a ‘development agenda’ at WIPO which aims to use knowledge as a tool for empowerment, rather than to deepen existing divides.”

Rens
says that South Africa’s innovative constitution has resulted in
dramatic changes to many areas of law affecting the transmission of
ideas including freedom of expression and access to information a
development with potentially interesting consequences for the local
enforcement of copyright laws.

South Africa offers unique
opportunities and poses unique challenges for the Creative Commons
model. Since the demise of apartheid, South Africa has emerged from
global isolation as a model for democracy around the world. With one of
the world’s most progressive constitutions and a Bill of Rights that
stresses individual freedoms, it is also a leader in African policy
development, and a champion for the causes of the developing world.
South Africa is, nonetheless, still a divided society. A small,
wealthy, relatively sophisticated population lives side by side with
and a large, unskilled informal population. Only 4 million of the
nation’s 43 million residents are online.

To join the
discussion on the local ‘porting’ of the Creative Commons licenses and
help make some real change, go to South African website,: <http://za.creativecommons.org>, or view the South African drafts <http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/za/>.

More about the LINK Centre at the University of the Witwatersrand

The LINK Centre
is the leading information and knowledge hub providing training,
research and consultancy in the Information and Communications
Technology (ICT) arena in order to develop public, private, NGO and community-based capacity within the Southern African region.

The
institution focuses on capacity building in the public and private
sectors and development arenas through quality training, applied
research and consultancy services necessary to maximize the benefits of
the Information Society and economy.

For more information, see <http://link.wits.ac.za>.

About Creative Commons

A 501(c)(3)
nonprofit founded in early 2002, Creative Commons promotes the creative
re-use of intellectual and artistic works — whether owned or in the
public domain — by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by
the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D.
and Catherine T. Mac Arthur? Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit <http://creativecommons.org>.

Contact

Heather Ford
Creative Commons South Africa
Ford.H@pdm.wits.ac.za
Phone: +27 11 717 3113
Cell: +27 82 872 7374

Andrew Rens
Creative Commons South Africa
andrewrens@yahoo.com

Glenn Otis Brown
Executive Director
Creative Commons
glenn@creativecommons.org

+1.415.336.1433

Press Kit
http://creativecommons.org/presskit/

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New Website Puts 2004 Campaign Media in the People’s Hands

Matt Haughey, October 17th, 2004

P2P-Politics.org lets friends and colleagues share political videos with just a click, thanks to Creative Commons copyright licensing

SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA —October 17, 2004—A new people-to-people website, P2P-Politics.org,
today announced a free service for sharing political expression online.
The site enables anyone to select from a menu of video clips the ones
that best express their view of the U.S. presidential elections, and
then email links to those clips, along with a personalized message, to
friends, family, and colleagues. Like a cross between an online
greeting-card service and a gallery of campaign advertisements, P2P-Politics.org makes everyday people broadcasters of political expression from across the spectrum.

The site launched today with 150 clips from http://MoveOn.org’s
“Bush-in-30-Seconds” contest. Because all entries to that contest are
under Creative Commons “some rights reserved” copyright licenses, their
reuse on P2P-Politics.org did not require the cumbersome process of rights-clearance.

The
site invites anyone to upload their own video clip, and it has invited
the Bush, Kerry, and Nader campaigns to contribute content to be
shared. So far, only the Kerry campaign has responded favorably to the
invitation, but organizers are optimistic that the other campaigns will
participate as well.

“Political ads have one purpose,” said
Lawrence Lessig, chairman of Creative Commons. “That is to elect the
candidate they support. With just over two weeks to go, we expect the
campaigns will be eager to help their supporters get the message out.”

The
ads are hosted by the Internet Archive, which hosts and serves files of
any size at no charge—provided they are under Creative Commons
licenses. P2P-Politics will curate content
to assure its appropriateness, and no content will be posted without
the authority of its copyright owner.

The site was built by
volunteers responding to a weblog post earlier this month. It was
designed by J Christopher Garcia and Aaron Swartz. It will be supported
through the election; afterwards, all content will remain at the
Internet Archive.

<http://p2p-politics.org>

About Creative Commons

A 501(c)(3)
nonprofit founded in early 2002, Creative Commons promotes the creative
re-use of intellectual and artistic works — whether owned or in the
public domain — by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by
the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D.
and Catherine T. Mac Arthur? Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit <http://creativecommons.org>.

About the Internet Archive

The
Internet Archive is a 501©(3) public nonprofit that was founded to
build an “Internet library,” with the purpose of offering permanent
access for researchers, historians, and scholars to historical
collections that exist in digital format. Founded in 1996 and located
in the Presidio of San Francisco, the Archive has been receiving data
donations from Alexa Internet and others. In late 1999, the
organization started to grow to build more well rounded collections,
like its Open Source Music and Open Source Movies catalogs.

For more information, visit <http://archive.org>.

Contact

Glenn Otis Brown

Executive Director
Creative Commons
glenn@creativecommons.org
+1.415.336.1433

Press Kit
http://creativecommons.org/presskit/

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Creative Commons in Canada and Spain

Glenn Otis Brown, October 14th, 2004

OPEN COPYRIGHT LICENSES OFFERED IN CANADA AND SPAIN

Creative Commons introduces its innovative copyright licenses to Canada and Spain; free legal tools available in two languages in each country

San Francisco, USA; Ottawa, Canada; and Barcelona, Spain — Oct. 11, 2004 — Creative Commons, a non-profit organization that provides an alternative to full copyright, recently unveiled localized versions of its innovative licensing system in Canada and Spain. The Creative Commons licenses afford authors and publishers an intermediate degree of protection over their photos, music, text, films, and educational materials — a “some rights reserved” copyright in contrast to the traditional “all rights reserved.”

With the announcement, Creative Commons now offers free legal tools in a total of ten country-specific versions. The organization already provides copyright licenses specific to Austrian, Brazilian, Dutch, Finnish, German, Japanese, U.S., and Taiwanese law, thanks to a global network of artists, lawyers, and technologists.

Staff at Creative Commons’ offices in San Francisco and Berlin worked with Ignasi Labastida i Juan, of the University of Barcelona, and Marcus Bornfreund, of the University of Ottawa’s law faculty, to adapt the standardized licenses for use under Spanish and Canadian law, respectively. The Spanish licenses are available in both Castilian Spanish and Catalan, and the Canadian licenses in both English and French.

Creative Commons released the new legal tools, which are available free of charge from the Creative Commons website, at conferences in Barcelona and Ottawa last week.

“We are honored to be able to work with these two great institutions,” says Glenn Otis Brown, Executive Director of Creative Commons. “Their translations and superb legal research have made possible two new sets of free legal tools, in four different languages, on two continents — in the same week.”

The global expansion of the Creative Commons project — which is chaired by Lawrence Lessig of Stanford University Law School — is one of the main priorities of the San Francisco-based organization this year.

“We look forward to adding more countries to the list during the remainder of the year,” says Christiane Asschenfeldt, the International Commons Coordinator, based in Berlin. “Thanks are due to the friends of Creative Commons around the world.”

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin), iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons

Glenn Otis Brown (San Francisco), Executive Director, Creative Commons

press@creativecommons.org

Press Kit

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Prickly Paradigm Press Releases its Backlist under a Creative Commons License

Glenn Otis Brown, October 14th, 2004

PRICKLY PARADIGM PRESS RELEASES ITS BACKLIST UNDER A CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE

Tradition of pamphleteering is reincarnated online with release of scholarly pamphlets under “some rights reserved” copyright licenses

San Francisco, CA and Chicago, IL, USA — October 13, 2004 — Prickly Paradigm Press (http://www.prickly-paradigm.com), a pamphlet-publishing press distributed by the University of Chicago Press, this week released its backlist for download under Creative Commons “some rights reserved” copyright licenses.

The licenses, provided free by the nonprofit Creative Commons, permit readers not only to download titles, but also to copy and share them. In return, the Press requires attribution (credit to the author) and retains the right to create derivative works (new works that re-use or incorporate the original)—signaling clearly to readers the freedoms and protections associated with the work.

The Creative Commons license advances Prickly Paradigm’s mission to reinvigorate old-time pamphleteering: “We emulate the passionate amateurs of history who circulated new and radical ideas to as wide an audience as possible,” says Matthew Engelke, editor at Prickly Paradigm.

“Prickly Paradigm’s move to go with Creative Commons licenses sets a groundbreaking precedent for scholarly presses,” said Glenn Brown, Executive Director of Creative Commons. “The dissemination of knowledge has always been the core mission of academic and DIY publishers, and our ‘some rights reserved’ licenses promote this principle.”

“What’s more, Prickly Paradigm’s anthropological slant makes it a fitting adopter of Creative Commons,” said Brown. “The great copyright debate is not only a legal matter, but also a cultural one.”

Prickly Paradigm inaugurates the project with a release of its Fall 2002 list, which includes such luminaries as Marshall Sahlins, Deirdre McCloskey, and Richard Rorty. The Spring 2003 list will soon be available for download, and later lists will follow on an ongoing basis after a year of circulation in print. The press currently has fifteen titles in its back catalog.

A list of licensed pamphlets can be found at http://www.prickly-paradigm.com/catalog.html.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works — whether owned or in the public domain — by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

About Prickly Paradigm Press

Founded in 1998, Prickly Paradigm Press LLC is the U.S. successor to Prickly Pear, a small British press launched in 1993. Publishing in the tradition of old-style pamphlets, Prickly Paradigm offers authors an unregulated venue for the expression of new or iconoclastic ideas not well suited to more conventional forms of academic publishing. The University of Chicago Press distributes prickly Paradigm titles.

More information can be found at http://www.prickly-paradigm.com.

Contact

Neeru Paharia,
Assistant Director, Creative Commons,
press@creativecommons.org

Press Kit

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David Byrne and Gilberto Gil in Concert at the Town Hall to Benefit Creative Commons

Matt Haughey, September 15th, 2004

Acclaimed musician and artist David Byrne will take the stage with Gilberto Gil, Brazil’s Minister of Culture and pop music legend, at The Town Hall in New York City on September 21st. Byrne and Gil, performing together for the first time, are uniting for a concert presented by WIRED Magazine to benefit Creative Commons, an innovative nonprofit that offers a new approach to creativity and copyright in the digital age ae an approach that respects authors’ rights both to control their work and share it on their own terms. Building on the “all rights reserved” of traditional copyright, Creative Commons has designed a voluntary system of “some rights reserved” protection.

“The understandable legal battle over music file sharing is strangling the creative potential of the Internet,” said Lawrence Lessig, Chair of Creative Commons and WIRED Magazine columnist. “While we should respect the rights of artists who don’t want their work used without permission, we should also make it easier for artists to mark their works with the freedoms they want it to carry, so that other creators can spread their creativity. The support of WIRED and artists such as David Byrne and Gilberto Gil will help us focus attention on this extraordinary opportunity, and encourage other artists to participate.”

Launched in 2002, Creative Commons provides two principal services, both free of charge. First, Creative Commons offers legal tools that help authors and artists explicitly permit certain uses of their work. A photographer might invite noncommercial sharing of an image of the Eiffel Tower, for example. Second, using a unique Web search technology, it helps other people find such artists and their work. For example, a documentary filmmaker might search Creative Commons for “all photographs of the Eiffel Tower free for noncommercial use,” and locate content posted anywhere on the Web meeting those criteria. Together, these tools help free the creative process from unnecessary legal friction and doubt.

“Until now the music industry has had to choose between two poor legal extremes: enforcing restrictive copyright protection or tolerating piracy,” said Chris Anderson, Editor in Chief of WIRED Magazine. “The great underexplored middle ground between them is “some rights reserved”, which reflects today’s real-world relationship between artists and consumers, where file sharing can be good marketing and sampling an homage. Many artists recognize this and simply lack an easy legal way to expressly permit it and decriminalize their fans. Creative Commons aims to provide that, and in doing so offers an important step towards an intellectual property rights framework for the 21st century.”

Concert Details
Who: David Byrne (www.davidbyrne.com) and Gilberto Gil (www.gilbertogil.com.br)
What: WIRED presents the Creative Commons benefit concert
When: Tuesday, September 21, 2004 | 8:00 p.m. EST
Where: The Town Hall, New York City [123 West 43rd Street, btw. 6/7th Avenues]
Tickets: Available at Ticketmaster (513) 562-4949 or online via www.ticketmaster.com
Also available at the Town Hall Box Office, www.the-townhall-nyc.org
Orchestra and loge seating tickets are $75.00; Balcony seats are $45.00-$55.00
LIVE Webcast:

The event will be Webcast LIVE 8-11 p.m. EST September 21 via a custom-skinned QuickTime player featuring live audio streamed in high-quality MPEG4/AAC audio, along with a slideshow of photos that will be shot and published via the player as the event occurs. QuickTime player will be available on www.creativecommons.org starting Wednesday, September 15.

About WIRED Magazine

WIRED is a monthly magazine that chronicles the people, companies, technologies, and ideas that are transforming the world around us. Each month, WIRED delivers a glimpse into the future of business, science, entertainment, education, culture, and politics.

Press Contacts: TJ Snyder Devon McMahon
PR21 for WIRED PR21 for WIRED
415-369-8118 415-369-8110
tj.snyder@pr21.com devon.mcmahon@pr21.com

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Creative Commons Applauds the Release of Political Film Footage on Peer-to-Peer

Matt Haughey, September 15th, 2004

Open copyright licensing of interviews from the controversial documentary Outfoxed prompts the nonprofit to invite political speakers of all stripes to share their expression during Campaign 2004

Los Angeles and San Francisco, USA – Robert Greenwald, director and producer of the documentary Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch’s War on Journalism, announced today the release of the film’s original footage under a Creative Commons “some rights reserved” copyright license.

The film, which has drawn attention for its pointed critique of Fox News, consists largely of interviews with former Fox employees and news guests. Under the Creative Commons Sampling Plus license, these interviews can now be shared legally on P2P networks or publicly performed for noncommercial purposes. Greenwald has even invited viewers to transform or re-edit his original footage or use it in their own films under the terms of the license. Footage from another Greenwald documentary, Uncovered: The War on Iraq, will also be available soon, Greenwald said.

“In making Outfoxed and Uncovered, I learned how cumbersome and expensive it can be to license footage from news organizations. Creative Commons licenses allow me as a filmmaker to know immediately how I can use a piece of content in my films,” said Greenwald. “I could think of no better way to walk the talk myself than by releasing the interviews from Outfoxed and Uncovered under a license that allows other filmmakers to use my material in new and creative ways. I look forward to seeing what others do with these interviews.”

Greenwald’s announcement prompted Creative Commons, a nonpartisan 501(c)(3) nonprofit dedicated to the legal sharing and re-use of creative works, to call upon authors and artists across the political spectrum to follow suit during this election season.

“We’d be delighted to see other films and footage ( liberal or conservative, favorable towards or critical of any media outlet or public policy ( free to share under Creative Commons licenses,” said Glenn Otis Brown, executive director of Creative Commons. “Political speech is meant to be heard far and wide. Whether in the form of campaign pamphlet, polemical movie, or protest song, core expression is perfectly suited to sharing online.”

The interviews from Outfoxed are now available for free download from the Internet Archive (http://archive.org) via Torrentocracy (http://torrentocracy.com), a cutting-edge tool combining BitTorrent, RSS, and traditional broadcast technologies.

Since its release in theaters and on DVD last month, Outfoxed has remained on Amazon.com’s top ten best-seller list.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation launched in late 2002, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works-whether owned or in the public domain-by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

About Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch’s War on Journalism

Outfoxed “examines how media empires, led by Rupert Murdoch’s Fox News, have been running a ‘race to the bottom’ in television news. This film provides
an in-depth look at Fox News and the dangers of ever-enlarging corporations
taking control of the public’s right to know.”

Outfoxed has sold over 100,000 DVDs since it’s release online in July and is currently in theaters nationwide.

For more information, visit http://outfoxed.org/.

About Uncovered: The War on Iraq

In his documentary feature, Uncovered: The War on Iraq, filmmaker Robert Greenwald “chronicles the Bush Administration’s determined quest to invade Iraq following the events of September 11, 2001. The film deconstructs the administration’s case for war through interviews with U.S intelligence and defense officials.”

For more information, visit http://www.truthuncovered.com.

About the Internet Archive

The Internet Archive is a 501(c)(3) public nonprofit that was founded to build an “Internet library,” with the purpose of offering permanent access for researchers, historians, and scholars to historical collections that exist in digital format. Founded in 1996 and located in the Presidio of San Francisco, the Archive has been receiving data donations from Alexa Internet and others. In late 1999, the organization started to grow to build more well rounded collections, like its Open Source Music and Open Source Movies catalogs.

For more information, visit http://archive.org.

About Torrentocracy

Torrentocracy (pronounced like the word “democracy”) “is a combination of RSS, BitTorrent, your television, and your remote control. In effect, it gives any properly motivated person or entity the ability to have their own TV station. By running Torrentocracy on a computer connected to your television, you not only become a viewer of any available content from the internet, but you also become a part of a vast grass roots media distribution network. This is not about the illegal distribution of media, but rather, about enabling an entirely new way to receive the video which you watch on your TV.”

For more information, visit http://torrentocracy.com.

Contact

Glenn Otis Brown
Executive Director
Creative Commons
glenn@creativecommons.org
1-415-946-3065

Jim Gilliam
Co-Producer
Outfoxed
jim@gilliam.com
1-310-562-2383

Stewart Cheifet
Director of Collections
Internet Archive
stewart@archive.org
1-415-561-6767

Gary Lerhaupt
Torrentocracy.com
gary@lerhaupt.com

Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/presskit/

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Developing Nations Copyright License Frees Creativity Across the Digital Divide

Matt Haughey, September 13th, 2004

The law-and-technology nonprofit Creative Commons offers a tool for authors and publishers to encourage innovation in developing nations while protecting their rights in the developed world.

Geneva, Switzerland, and San Francisco, USA – Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative and educational materials free to share and re-use, unveiled today its Developing Nations copyright license. Creative Commons chairman Lawrence Lessig and Developing Nations license architect Jamie Love announced the new license at the Trans Atlantic Consumer Dialogue’s workshop on “The Future of WIPO,” in Geneva.

Like all of Creative Commons’ legal tools, the Developing Nations license is free of charge and allows authors and artists to invite certain uses of their work, upon certain conditions — to declare “some rights reserved” as opposed to the “all rights reserved” of traditional copyright.

Specifically, the Developing Nations license allows copyright holders to invite a wide range of royalty-free uses of their work in developing nations while retaining their full copyright in the developed world.

“The Developing Nations license allows, for the first time, any copyright holder in the world to participate first-hand in reforming global information policy,” said Lessig. “The fact is that most of the world’s population is simply priced out of developed nations’ publishing output. To authors, that means an untapped readership. To economists, it means ‘deadweight loss.’ To human rights advocates and educators, it is a tragedy. The Developing Nations license is designed to address all three concerns.”

The license was designed by Jamie Love, an expert on intellectual property and development, in cooperation with attorneys at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich and Rosati, in Silicon Valley, and other experts on intellectual property and development.

“The new license makes it easier to expand access to knowledge and support development. It is a tool to make the resource-poor information-rich,” said Jamie Love.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works-whether owned or in the public domain-by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

To learn more about the Developing Nations license,
see http://creativecommons.org/license/devnations.

Contact

Glenn Otis Brown (San Francisco)
Executive Director
Creative Commons
glenn@creativecommons.org
1-415-336-1433

Jamie Love (Washington, D.C.)
The Consumer Project on Technology
james.love@cptech.org

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
International Commons Director
Creative Commons
christiane@creativecommons.org

Press Kit
http://creativecommons.org/presskit/

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