Press Releases

Free Online Music Booms as SoundClick Offers Creative Commons Licenses

Matt Haughey, August 11th, 2004

Online music community sees over 30,000 songs licensed under “some rights reserved” copyright in just one month.

San Francisco, CA and New York, NY, USA – Soundclick (http://www.soundclick.com), one of the Internet’s largest music community sites, now offers Creative Commons licenses as an option for all songs uploaded to its website. Soundclick, which sees about 70,000 song uploads per month, soft-launched the Creative Commons license option one month ago. In that time, bands and artists on Soundclick have licensed over 30,000 songs, demonstrating a huge demand from musicians to declare “some rights reserved.”

A list of licensed tracks can be found at http://www.soundclick.com/genres/cc_license.cfm.

The copyright licenses, provided free by the nonprofit Creative Commons, permit fans not only to download music files, but also to copy and share them. In return, musicians who license their songs require attribution (credit as author) and can specify several conditions, including whether to allow remixes, mash-ups, or commercial uses.

The licenses allow artists to harness the power of the Net for maximum promotion while retaining certain rights to their work — while signaling clearly to fans what they can and can’t do.

“Soundclick’s move to offer Creative Commons Licenses is a huge step for the world of independent music,” said Neeru Paharia, Assistant Director of Creative Commons. “The rapid uptake of the licenses proves that there is a huge demand from artists to clarify how they want their work shared or re-used on the Net. Soundclick has made an enormous impact on the amount of music that’s available for people to share and re-use.”

“Opening the licensing process offers new dimensions for musicians,” said Turhan Canli, Chief Executive Officer of Soundclick. “The system developed by Creative Commons is easy to use and understand, even for people who have never considered licensing their music. Musicians on SoundClick are enthusiastic that they can share their songs this way. Being able to legally remix or re-use songs is an exciting and innovative option that clearly helps the whole music community. The fact that within one month more than 30,000 licenses were issued on SoundClick speaks volumes. It’s what musicians have been waiting for.”

Thanks to the rapid rate of adoption at Soundclick and other similar sites, Creative Commons has created the largest pool of openly-licensed music on the Internet. Most of the music can be legally traded on file-sharing networks, and much can be used as source material for remixes, mash-ups, or even synched to video, as long as the conditions of the license are followed. Given the recent proliferation of inexpensive media authoring applications, such as Apple’s GarageBand and Adobe’s Audition, much of this licensed music becomes valuable free source material from which to build new works.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works-whether owned or in the public domain-by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

About Soundclick

Launched in 1997, SoundClick Inc. is a privately funded company. Incorporated in 1999 in California, SoundClick has become one of the largest music communities on the Internet. More than 70,000 new songs and 7,000 new bands are added each month, making it the fastest growing music community. SoundClick features artist pages, unlimited song uploads, CD sales, message boards, charts, and several premium services. All standard services for artists and listeners are free-of-charge.

More information can be found at http://www.soundclick.com.

Contact

Neeru Paharia
Assistant Director, Creative Commons
neeru@creativecommons.org
+1.415.946.3068

Turhan Canli
CEO, SoundClick Inc
Press@soundclick.com

Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/presskit/

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Creative Commons German Licenses Now Available

Matt Haughey, June 11th, 2004

Creative Commons, a non-profit organization seeking to promote the
sharing of high-quality content, today introduced its highly innovative
licensing system for copyrighted material to Germany.

Palo Alto, USA, and Berlin, GERMANY. Creative Commons, a non-profit
organization seeking to promote the sharing of high-quality content,
today introduced its highly innovative licensing system for copyrighted
digital material to Germany. The Creative Commons licenses, which are
already widely used in the United States, Brazil, Japan, and Finland by
authors, composers and other artists to share their work with others,
were transposed into German law by a team of professional lawyers and
legal academics. Creative Commons staff of the organization’s two offices
in Palo Alto and Berlin collaborated with the ifrOSS institute and
Professor Dreier from the University of Karlsruhe (TH) on the project.

“The launch of the German licenses is a momentous step towards creating a
new and truly global layer of reasonable copyright law,” points out
Lawrence Lessig, chairman of Creative Commons and professor at Stanford
University Law School, who is currently delivering a series of lectures
on intellectual property rights at the WOS 3 Conference in Berlin, the
Wissenschaftskolleg, Grunewald, and the European Commission in Brussels.

After launches in Japan and Brazil earlier this year, Germany and Finland
are the first jurisdictions in the European Union (EU) in which the
Creative Commons licensing-system (proclaiming “some rights reserved”
instead of “all rights reserved”) is available in local language
versions.

By adding Germany and Finland to the available range of jurisdictions
Creative Commons’s international expansion progresses at an accelerated
pace. “We look forward to being able to offer local language licenses to
all European users in the near future,” says Christiane Asschenfeldt, the
iCommons Coordinator, based in Berlin. “Our project leads around the
world — almost all volunteers — display a great sense of enthusiasm and
devotion to our dream of recreating a healthy public domain.”

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative reuse of
intellectual works — whether owned or in the public domain. It is
sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain,
the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett
Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it
shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for
Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org/.

For our press kit, visit http://creativecommons.org/presskit/.

To learn more about Creative Commons’ international efforts, visit
http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons
christiane at creativecommons.org

Glenn Otis Brown (Palo Alto)
Executive Director, Creative Commons
glenn at creativecommons.org

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DMusic Offers Creative Commons Licenses to its User Base Of 300,000

Matt Haughey, May 4th, 2004

Oldest independent digital music community and Silicon Valley nonprofit announce new copyright option for musicians

Palo Alto, CA and Jenkintown, PA, USA – DMusic, the first and oldest independent digital music community, announced today that it will offer Creative Commons licenses as an option to all DMusic contributing musicians.

The licenses, provided by the nonprofit Creative Commons, allow artists to invite fans to copy or build upon their work, on certain conditions – to declare “some rights reserved” in contrast to the “all rights reserved” of full-fledged copyright.

Dmusic will also tag Creative Commons-licensed MP3s with metadata – a machine-readable expression of the copyright license terms. The music can thus travel with its own terms of use across the Internet, enabling file-sharing networks and search engines to find and identify it as free to share with its author’s consent.

To see this search feature in action, go to AltaVista’s multimedia search engine, http://www.altavista.com/audio/ and type, in quotes, “remix me” or “creative commons.”

“The Creative Commons license provides all creators of art, music, literature, and science an opportunity to protect their creations but at the same time allow others to utilize the creation in various ways,” said Larry Feldman, DMusic owner. “DMusic recognizes the need for copyright reform around the world and has decided to take a stand for future creativity unfettered by arcane nineteenth- and twentieth-century copyright ideas. Mash culture, digital copying, cloning and sampling, pastiche and other recently introduced techniques, added to the ease of digital transformation of pre-existing materials into new art and art forms, are making the old copyright laws a drag on creativity. Artists shouldn’t have to worry about such complicated stuff. The copyright law makes the tax code look like E = MC2.”

“The best music in America is independent,” said Thomas Barger, DMusic user. Saying ‘yes’ to Creative Commons licensing is saying ‘yes’ to a commitment to reaching the widest audience possible.”

“DMusic’s move to offer Creative Commons licenses is an important step for the mainstream music community,” said Lawrence Lessig, chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at Stanford. “The Net has long facilitated music sharing and distribution – technically. Creative Commons copyright licenses, seamlessly integrated by DMusic for its willing contributors, further facilitate sharing – legally.”

About Tagging MP3s as “Some Rights Reserved”

Creative Commons copyright licenses come in three expressions: (1) an intuitive, plain-language summary (human-readable); (2) a thorough copyright license complete with all the legal nitty-gritty (lawyer-readable); and (2) a summary of the legal terms in mark-up language (machine-readable). DMusic now tags licensed MP3s with the machine-readable layer, so that search engines and fans can find and identify legally shared music.

To learn more about Creative Commons’ MP3 technology, visit http://creativecommons.org/technology/embedding.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative reuse of intellectual works – whether owned or in the public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

For our press kit, visit http://creativecommons.org/presskit/.

To learn more about Creative Commons’ international efforts, visit http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

About DMusic

DMusic is the first and oldest independent digital music community. It was founded in 1997, features approximately 100,000 independently owned music tracks uploaded from desktop computers all over the planet, and is home to over 300,000 registered users. DMusic offers free and enhanced subscriber services for musicians and fans of music, including free digital Internet radio, a CD store, options to stream or download, and lots more. DMusic LLC is a privately owned concern and a division of Lawtomation, Inc. of Jenkintown, Pennsylvania.

For more information, visit http://dmusic.com.

Contact

Neeru Paharia
Assistant Director, Creative Commons
1.650.724.3717 (tel)
neeru@creativecommons.org

Lawrence Feldman
Owner, DMusic
1.215.885.3302
leflaw@dmusic.com

Press Kit: http://creativecommons.org/presskit/

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Creative Commons Expands to Germany with the Institute for Information Law at the University of Karlsruhe (TH)

Matt Haughey, April 6th, 2004

The Institute for Information Law at the University of Karlsruhe (TH) will lead the license translation and work to expand global access to Germany’s culture.

Palo Alto, USA, and Berlin, GERMANY – April 5 – Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative works free for copying and re-use, announced today that it would expand its International Commons (iCommons) project to Germany.

The Institute for Information Law at the University of Karlsruhe (TH), Germany, will lead the effort.

First announced in March 2003, iCommons is Creative Commons’ project to disseminate its machine-readable copyright licenses worldwide and make them useful in a variety of legal systems.

As the lead institution, the Institute for Information Law at the University of Karlsruhe (TH) will coordinate a public effort to translate the Creative Commons licenses literally and legally for use in Germany.

“We are very pleased to be able to work with the excellent Institute at Karlsruhe,” said Lawrence Lessig, Chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at Stanford University, where the organization is headquartered. “Germany will play an important role in bringing the International Commons to fruition in Europe.”

“We are tremendously excited to be involved in bringing the Creative Commons movement to Germany,” explained Professor Dr. Thomas Dreier, the iCommons Germany project lead and an acclaimed authority on German copyright law.

“There is already strong demand within the German community for a legal means for facilitating the distribution of Open Content as an innovative alternative to traditional forms of distribution based on payment of royalties. Creative Commons will be a great platform on which to build these protocols and agreements. Thanks are due to Dr. Till Jaeger, who provided the first draft of the license.”

The Institute for Information Law at the University of Karlsruhe (TH) will field comments on an archived email discussion at the Creative Commons website, http://www.creativecommons.org/discuss#germany.

Germany joins Australia, Brazil, China, Croatia, Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Spain, Taiwan, and the United Kingdom in the iCommons effort.

More about Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or in the public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

For more information about iCommons, see http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

More about the Insitute for Information Law at the University of Karlsruhe (TH), Germany

The Insitute for Information Law at the University of Karlsruhe (TH) within the Center for Applied Legal Studies (Zentrum fuer Angewandte Rechtswissenschaft, ZAR) was founded in 1999. Its task is to provide teaching and research focusing on legal issues at the intersection of law, technology, and economics. Together with the departments of computer science and economics, the Institute for Information Law supports a unique diploma course in the field. Furthermore, the Institute participates in a research project on ‘Information Management and Market Engineering’, funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgesellschaft (DFG). The Institute also houses the secretariat of the German Computer Law Association (Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Recht und Informatik, DGRI). Publications of the Members of the Institute concentrate on issues in intellectual property law, internet law and corporate law.

Website: http://www.z-a-r.de

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons
christiane@creativecommons.org

Prof. Dr. Thomas Dreier (Karlsruhe)
Director, Institute for Information Law
dreier@ira.uka.de

Oliver Meyer (Karlsruhe)
Research Assistant, Institute for Information Law
oliver.meyer@ira.uni-karlsrue.de

Ellen Euler (Karlsruhe)
Research Assistant, Institute for Information Law
ellen.euler@ira.uni-karlsruhe.de

Glenn Otis Brown (Palo Alto)
Executive Director, Creative Commons
glenn@creativecommons.org

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Creative Commons Launches Legal Music Sharing and Search

Matt Haughey, March 31st, 2004

The Silicon Valley nonprofit announces new file-sharing-friendly music
license alongside its new Get Content search engine.

Austin, Texas, USA – March 18, 2004 – Creative Commons, a nonprofit
dedicated to expanding the range of creative works free to share and
build upon, announced its new Music Sharing License and Get Content
search engine at the South by Southwest Music Festival here today.

The license, which is available free of charge from the Creative Commons
website, allows musicians to clearly mark their songs as free to download
and share while protecting their commercial and other rights. The license
also helps musicians tag their works digitally, which allows Creative
Commons’ Get Content search engine to index them from the web site.

This is the music-sharing notice bands can use to invite their fans to
download and share their music noncommercially.

“Finally, musicians who want to share and fans who want legal downloads
can find each other easily and quickly,” said Neeru Paharia, Assistant
Director of Creative Commons. “The Net already makes widespread
distribution very easy – technically. The Music Sharing license, in
combination with the new Get Content search engine, lets musicians
harness the Net’s distributive power while protecting themselves –
legally.”

Matthew King Kaufman, founder of Beserkley Records and MP34U.com, said:
“If there’s going to be legal p2p, then a Creative Commons Music Sharing
license is a mandatory prerequisite.”

Like all Creative Commons tools, the Music-Sharing License uses a
three-layer interface to put fans on notice of the music’s legal status.
First is the Commons Deed, a plain-language summary of the legal
language’s key terms. Next is the Legal Code, the full copyright license
in all its nitty-gritty detail (identical to the legal code for the
Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivativeWorks license). Third is Creative
Commons’ metadata, a machine-readable expression of the license, so that
users can search for and sort sharing-friendly music with the Get Content
search engine, which indexes web pages carrying Creative Commons’ license
tags and metadata. The search engine is the first that allows users to
find content based on the permissions and restrictions associated with
it.

Links:
Creative Commons: http://creativecommons.org
Music-Sharing License: http://creativecommons.org/license/music
GET CONTENT! Search Engine: http://creativecommons.org/getcontent/

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of
intellectual works – whether owned or public domain. It is sustained by
the
generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and
Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative
Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space,
and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org/.

Contact

Neeru Paharia
Assistant Director, Creative Commons
1.650.724.3717 (tel)
neeru@creativecommons.org

Glenn Otis Brown
Executive Director, Creative Commons
1.650.723.7572 (tel)

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Creative Commons Expands To The Middle East With AGIP

Matt Haughey, March 26th, 2004

Abu-Ghazaleh Intellectual Property (AGIP) is the first to bring the International Commons (iCommons) project to the Middle East.

Palo Alto, USA, and Amman, JORDAN – March 25, 2004 – Creative Commons, a non-profit corporation dedicated to building a body of creative works free for copying and re-use, announced today that it would expand its International Commons (iCommons) project in Jordan and the Middle East. AGIP, the leading provider of intellectual property services in the Arab region, will lead this effort.

Professor Lawrence Lessig, Chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at Stanford University, in the U.S., said: “We’re very excited to have AGIP lead iCommons project in Jordan. AGIP’s participation is crucial to our growing effort in promoting the international cultural commons.”

Mr. Charles Shaban, executive director of AGIP’s Regional Office said, “We are very pleased to be the first Arab country to bring the International Commons to this region and we hope that this project will be a step forward towards building the digital commons in cyberspace.”

Meanwhile, Mr. Rami Olwan, an e-commerce legal consultant and project lead for iCommons in Jordan stated, “The international Creative Commons project is unique in the sense that it offers new concepts to the current copyright legal system.”

Announced in March 2003, iCommons is Creative Commons’ project to make its machine-readable copyright licenses useful worldwide. As the lead institution for Jordan, AGIP will coordinate a public effort to translate the Creative Commons licenses literally and legally for use there. Jordan joins Australia, Brazil, Catalonia, China, Croatia, Finland, France, Ireland, Japan, Spain, Taiwan, and the United Kingdom in this effort.

AGIP will field comments relating to their specific initiatives in archived email discussions on the Creative Commons website at:

http://creativecommons.org/discuss#/jordan

More about Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or in the public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School (U.S.), where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

For more information about iCommons, see http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

More about AGIP

Abu-Ghazaleh Intellectual Property (AGIP) is a pioneering firm in intellectual property protection in the Arab world and today remains the region’s leader in this field. When AGIP was established in 1972 under the name TMP Agents, intellectual property protection was in its infancy in the Arab region. Legislation was weak and few foreign companies attempted to protect their intellectual property in the region.

The situation has changed dramatically over the last 3 decades and AGIP today is the largest IP firm in the Arab world, managing the protection of nearly half of the global Fortune 500 firms among many others. As Arab nations have developed, they have rapidly increased the legal protections applicable to intellectual property and have continued to work on increasing the effectiveness of enforcement of IP laws. AGIP has consistently been at the forefront of efforts to improve the infrastructure of Arab intellectual property protection.

It has always been the most generous Arab contributor to regional and global intellectual property associations and has worked in close coordination with Arab governments and multilateral governmental organizations such as WIPO to improve the climate for intellectual property protection.

Operating from its headquarters in Amman, Jordan, AGIP has offices in every major Arab city with liaison offices in Europe, UK, Canada and the USA.

For more information about AGIP, please visit:

http://www.agip.com

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin, Germany)
iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons
christiane@creativecommons.org

Rami Olwan (Ammam, Jordan)
Project Lead, iCommons Jordan
rolwan@tagi.com

Glenn Otis Brown (Palo Alto, USA)
Executive Director, Creative Commons
glenn@creativecommons.org

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Creative Commons expands to Australia with Queensland University of Technology (QUT)

Matt Haughey, March 25th, 2004

Queensland University of Technology (QUT) will lead the license translation and work to expand global access to Australia’s culture

Palo Alto, USA, and Brisbane, AUSTRALIA – March 25, 2004 – Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative works free for copying and re-use, announced today that it would expand its International Commons (iCommons) project to Australia.

Queensland University of Technology (QUT), in Brisbane, will lead the effort.

First announced in March 2003, iCommons is Creative Commons’ project to make its machine-readable copyright licenses useful worldwide.

As the lead institution, QUT will coordinate a public effort to translate the Creative Commons licenses literally and legally for use in Australia.

“We are thrilled to be working with Queensland University of Technology,” said Lawrence Lessig, Chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at Stanford University, in the U.S. “Australia will be a vital participant in bringing the international cultural Commons to fruition.”

“We are also excited to be involved in developing Creative Commons in Australia,” explained Project Co-Leader Brian Fitzgerald, Professor and Head of the School of Law at QUT. “There is already strong demand within the Australian community for a legal means of facilitating the distribution of Open Content, and Creative Commons will be a tremendous platform on which to build these protocols and agreements.”

Tom Cochrane, Project Co-Leader and Deputy Vice Chancellor at QUT, said that with copyright law and regulation getting more attention by the day, QUT was pleased to be associated with this international effort to find collaborative solutions more appropriate to rapidly changing digital environments.

“Even within the University, there are already numerous direct applications of the model in our day to day academic work,” Mr Cochrane said.

QUT will field comments on an archived email discussion at the Creative Commons website, http://www.creativecommons.org/discuss#australia.

Australia joins Brazil, China, Croatia, Finland, France, Ireland, Japan, Spain, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, and Jordan in the iCommons effort.

More about Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or in the public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

For more information about iCommons, see http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

More about Queensland University of Technology

QUT is a major Australian university with a strong interest in and commitment to information law and policy. As well as its large Law Faculty, QUT is also home to the Faculty of Creative Industries, which is keen to utilize the Creative Commons model to further develop innovation in the creative industries; the Faculty of Information Technology, which is a leader in information security; and the Faculty of Business, which has recognized expertise in technology policy and innovation.

QUT’s partner in this exercise has been Ian Oi and his team at Blake Dawson Waldron Lawyers. Ian Oi is a recognized expert in Technology and Intellectual Property Issues and plays an active role in the development of law and policy in this area.

For more information about QUT, visit http://www.qut.edu.au.
For more information about Blake Dawson Waldron Lawyers, visit http://www.bdw.com.au.

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons
christiane@creativecommons.org

Professor Brian Fitzgerald (Brisbane)
Project Lead, iCommons Australia
Head of School of Law, Queensland University of Technology
email: bf.fitzgerald@qut.edu.au

Glenn Otis Brown
Executive Director (Palo Alto)
glenn@creativecommons.org

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Japanese Creative Commons Licenses Available Now

Matt Haughey, March 3rd, 2004

Creative Commons and GLOCOM release official Japanese copyright licenses for iCommons Japan, the first country-specific adaptation of the open content system.

Palo Alto, USA, and Tokyo, Japan – Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative works free for copying and re-use, and GLOCOM, its Japanese affiliate, today announced the official roll out of their iCommons Japan licenses.

“The launch of the Japanese iCommons licenses is a major milestone for both Creative Commons and the global free culture movement, generally,” said Lawrence Lessig, Creative Commons’ chairman and professor of law at Stanford University. “We would like to give special recognition to GLOCOM, and to Yuko Noguchi and Emi Wakatsuki, the lawyers whose dedication helped make this possible.” Lessig also acknowledged the contributions and comments of Machina, http://homepage3.nifty.com/machina/, a technology commentator and Japan-based blogger.

“We are pleased to be among the first international Commons (iCommons) participants,” said Motohiro Tsuchiya, project lead iCommons Japan and assistant professor and senior research fellow at GLOCOM, International University of Japan. “This launch is a joint effort of many ‘commoners’ here in Japan. It has always been part of our age-old culture to share creative works such as drawings, poetry, music and more. iCommons Japan is a natural extension of this practice.”

The licenses, translated into the Japanese language and adapted to Japanese law, allow copyright holders easily to inform others that their works are free for copying and other uses, under specific conditions – to declare “some rights reserved.” These self-help tools, which are free of charge, offer new ways to distribute creative works on generous terms along the rich spectrum between full copyright and public domain. Authors and artists in Japan can now express a preference for sharing their work on their own terms.

Japanese-speaking visitors to the Creative Commons Web site now automatically view a full Japanese translation of the license choice process as the site detects the users’ web browser settings.

See http://creativecommons.org/license/?lang=ja for the license selection page in Japanese, and http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/jp/ for an example of a Japan-specific license.

Japan is the first country to launch iCommons licenses.

More about Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or in the public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

For more information about iCommons, see http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

More about Glocom

GLOCOM was established in 1991 as a social science research institute specializing in the study of information society as well as Japanese society. From the outset it was thought that the collection and dissemination of information through the utilization of computer networks was important, and this goal was realized in 1993 when the center established an Internet connection. Ever since, by utilizing the most up-to-date information and communication technologies, GLOCOM has been able to engage in various research activities, including generation of policy proposals and involvement in education-related projects. GLOCOM has set out to be a modern information “intelprise,” an institution promoting the distribution and sharing of “wisdom.”

For more information about GLOCOM, visit http://www.glocom.ac.jp/.

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
International Commons Coordinator, Creative Commons
christiane@creativecommons.org

Motohiro Tsuchiya, (Tokyo)
Project Lead, iCommons Japan
Assistant Professor, Senior Research Fellow, GLOCOM
taiyo@glocom.ac.jp

Glenn Otis Brown (Palo Alto)
Executive Director, Creative Commons
glenn@creativecommons.org

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Creative Commons to Offer Spanish and Catalan Copyright Licenses with University of Barcelona

Matt Haughey, February 26th, 2004

University of Barcelona is spearheading the effort to translate Creative Commons licenses into Spanish and Catalan.

Palo Alto, USA and Barcelona, Spain – Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative works free for copying and re-use, announced today that formal work has begun for expanding its International Commons (iCommons) project to the Iberian peninsula, with both Spanish and Catalan translations in the works.

The University of Barcelona will lead the effort.

“We are thrilled to be working with the University of Barcelona,” said Lawrence Lessig, Chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at Stanford. “With its rich heritage and linguistic reach, Spain can serve as a model for many countries in expanding the global cultural commons. And we’re excited to begin work on Catalan versions of the licenses in parallel.”

“We think that Creative Commons’ project is very interesting and therefore we have decided to promote it from a public institution as the University of Barcelona,” said Ignasi Labastida i Juan, project lead of the iCommons efforts in Spain and Catalonia. Ignasi Labastida i Juan added, “Since the project of the licenses appeared, we thought that we needed adaptations for our own laws and in our languages. The idea to create iCommons Catalonia was very important to us since we are not well known but we speak the seventh language in the EU in terms of number of speakers – more than ten million.”

First announced in March 2003, iCommons is Creative Commons’ project to make its machine-readable copyright licenses useful worldwide. As the lead institution, University of Barcelona will coordinate a public effort literally and legally to translate the Creative Commons licenses. University of Barcelona will field comments on an archived email discussion at the Creative Commons website:

http://www.creativecommons.org/discuss#spain
http://www.creativecommons.org/discuss#catalonia.

Spain and Catalonia join Brazil, Croatia, Italy, Ireland, Finland, Japan, China, Taiwan, France, and the UK in the iCommons effort. Several other iCommons jurisdictions and languages will soon follow.

More about Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or in the public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org/.

For more information about iCommons, see http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

More about University of Barcelona

The University of Barcelona, founded in 1450, is the oldest and largest of the six universities in Barcelona, and of the ten in Catalonia. It has 76,000 students – more than half of the total student population of Catalonia – and is the second largest in terms of students number in Spain. The University of Barcelona has four campuses, in different parts of the city. The University is the main Spanish university research centre, and one of the leaders in Europe, in terms of projects and the quality achieved in this field. One of the aims of the University is to create, transmit and expand the cultural, scientific, and technical knowledge and to contribute to society’s development.

The university is particularly interested in fostering international relations, and for many years has been the leader among European universities in numbers of student exchanges organized as part of the Erasmus program. Since 1995, the UB has implemented a quality program aiming fundamentally to design mid and long term strategies in order to evaluate and improve teaching and research in public higher education.

For more information about University of Barcelona, visit http://www.ub.edu/.

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons
christiane@creativecommons.org

Ignasi Labastida i Juan (Barcelona)
Project Lead, iCommons Spain
University of Barcelona
ilabastida@ub.edu

Glenn Otis Brown
Executive Director (Palo Alto)
1.650.723.7572 (tel)
1.415.336.1433 (cell)
glenn@creativecommons.org

http://creativecommons.org

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Creative Commons expands to Croatia with Multimedia Institute (mi2)

Matt Haughey, February 26th, 2004

Multimedia Institute (mi2) will lead the license translation and work to expand global access to Croatia’s culture

Palo Alto, USA, and Zagreb, CROATIA – Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative works free for copying and re-use, announced today that it would expand its International Commons (iCommons) project to Croatia. Multimedia Institute (mi2), in Zagreb, will lead the effort.

“Croatia has already demonstrated an extraordinary range of creative
use of new technology,” said Lawrence Lessig, Chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at Stanford. “We’re eager to work with iCommons
Croatia to support that work.”

“It’s liberating for Croatia to participate in this global effort to create a common space for creativity, especially at a time when legislative regimes often overlook this public good,” said Diana Kovacevic, project lead.

First announced in March 2003, iCommons is Creative Commons’ project to make its machine-readable copyright licenses useful worldwide. As the lead institution, (mi2) will coordinate a public effort literally and legally to translate the Creative Commons licenses for use in Croatia. (mi2) will field comments on an archived email discussion at the Creative Commons website, http://www.creativecommons.org/discuss#croatia.

Croatia joins Brazil, China, Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Taiwan and the United Kingdom in the iCommons effort.

More About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or in the public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org/.

For more information about iCommons, see http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

More About Multimedia Institute (mi2)

(mi2) sprang up in 1999 as a spin-off of the Internet program of Open Society Institute Croatia. Entering locally uncharted territory between social and cultural action and new technological developments, (mi2) brought together an emerging generation of civil activists, media practitioners, urban culture actors and social and media theorists who set out to pursue two principle tasks:

1) To promote and educate in media and technological practices relevant for the functioning and development of a social and cultural sector, and

2) To promote and develop socially inflected approaches to new technologies, especially as investments in the local emerging market gradually increased the penetration of new media and introduced the domination of commercial standards.

Over the past two years, (mi2) has become increasingly involved in cooperative activities at the local, regional and international levels to strengthen the cultural scene and advocate on behalf of the public domain. It is working towards initiating structural changes in a wide range of areas, including: non-institutional culture, informal education, technology, intellectual property rights, and access to public resources.

For more information about (mi2), visit http://www.mi2.hr/.

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons
christiane@creativecommons.org

Diana Kovacevic, (Zagreb)
Co-Project Lead, iCommons Croatia
diana@mi2.hr

Tomislav Medak, (Zagreb)
Co-Project Lead iCommons Croatia
to-me@mi2.hr

Glenn Otis Brown
Executive Director (Palo Alto)
glenn@creativecommons.org

http://creativecommons.org

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