Press Releases

Japanese Creative Commons Licenses Available Now

Matt Haughey, March 3rd, 2004

Creative Commons and GLOCOM release official Japanese copyright licenses for iCommons Japan, the first country-specific adaptation of the open content system.

Palo Alto, USA, and Tokyo, Japan – Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative works free for copying and re-use, and GLOCOM, its Japanese affiliate, today announced the official roll out of their iCommons Japan licenses.

“The launch of the Japanese iCommons licenses is a major milestone for both Creative Commons and the global free culture movement, generally,” said Lawrence Lessig, Creative Commons’ chairman and professor of law at Stanford University. “We would like to give special recognition to GLOCOM, and to Yuko Noguchi and Emi Wakatsuki, the lawyers whose dedication helped make this possible.” Lessig also acknowledged the contributions and comments of Machina, http://homepage3.nifty.com/machina/, a technology commentator and Japan-based blogger.

“We are pleased to be among the first international Commons (iCommons) participants,” said Motohiro Tsuchiya, project lead iCommons Japan and assistant professor and senior research fellow at GLOCOM, International University of Japan. “This launch is a joint effort of many ‘commoners’ here in Japan. It has always been part of our age-old culture to share creative works such as drawings, poetry, music and more. iCommons Japan is a natural extension of this practice.”

The licenses, translated into the Japanese language and adapted to Japanese law, allow copyright holders easily to inform others that their works are free for copying and other uses, under specific conditions – to declare “some rights reserved.” These self-help tools, which are free of charge, offer new ways to distribute creative works on generous terms along the rich spectrum between full copyright and public domain. Authors and artists in Japan can now express a preference for sharing their work on their own terms.

Japanese-speaking visitors to the Creative Commons Web site now automatically view a full Japanese translation of the license choice process as the site detects the users’ web browser settings.

See http://creativecommons.org/license/?lang=ja for the license selection page in Japanese, and http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/jp/ for an example of a Japan-specific license.

Japan is the first country to launch iCommons licenses.

More about Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or in the public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

For more information about iCommons, see http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

More about Glocom

GLOCOM was established in 1991 as a social science research institute specializing in the study of information society as well as Japanese society. From the outset it was thought that the collection and dissemination of information through the utilization of computer networks was important, and this goal was realized in 1993 when the center established an Internet connection. Ever since, by utilizing the most up-to-date information and communication technologies, GLOCOM has been able to engage in various research activities, including generation of policy proposals and involvement in education-related projects. GLOCOM has set out to be a modern information “intelprise,” an institution promoting the distribution and sharing of “wisdom.”

For more information about GLOCOM, visit http://www.glocom.ac.jp/.

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
International Commons Coordinator, Creative Commons
[email protected]

Motohiro Tsuchiya, (Tokyo)
Project Lead, iCommons Japan
Assistant Professor, Senior Research Fellow, GLOCOM
[email protected]

Glenn Otis Brown (Palo Alto)
Executive Director, Creative Commons
[email protected]

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Creative Commons to Offer Spanish and Catalan Copyright Licenses with University of Barcelona

Matt Haughey, February 26th, 2004

University of Barcelona is spearheading the effort to translate Creative Commons licenses into Spanish and Catalan.

Palo Alto, USA and Barcelona, Spain – Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative works free for copying and re-use, announced today that formal work has begun for expanding its International Commons (iCommons) project to the Iberian peninsula, with both Spanish and Catalan translations in the works.

The University of Barcelona will lead the effort.

“We are thrilled to be working with the University of Barcelona,” said Lawrence Lessig, Chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at Stanford. “With its rich heritage and linguistic reach, Spain can serve as a model for many countries in expanding the global cultural commons. And we’re excited to begin work on Catalan versions of the licenses in parallel.”

“We think that Creative Commons’ project is very interesting and therefore we have decided to promote it from a public institution as the University of Barcelona,” said Ignasi Labastida i Juan, project lead of the iCommons efforts in Spain and Catalonia. Ignasi Labastida i Juan added, “Since the project of the licenses appeared, we thought that we needed adaptations for our own laws and in our languages. The idea to create iCommons Catalonia was very important to us since we are not well known but we speak the seventh language in the EU in terms of number of speakers – more than ten million.”

First announced in March 2003, iCommons is Creative Commons’ project to make its machine-readable copyright licenses useful worldwide. As the lead institution, University of Barcelona will coordinate a public effort literally and legally to translate the Creative Commons licenses. University of Barcelona will field comments on an archived email discussion at the Creative Commons website:

http://www.creativecommons.org/discuss#spain
http://www.creativecommons.org/discuss#catalonia.

Spain and Catalonia join Brazil, Croatia, Italy, Ireland, Finland, Japan, China, Taiwan, France, and the UK in the iCommons effort. Several other iCommons jurisdictions and languages will soon follow.

More about Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or in the public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org/.

For more information about iCommons, see http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

More about University of Barcelona

The University of Barcelona, founded in 1450, is the oldest and largest of the six universities in Barcelona, and of the ten in Catalonia. It has 76,000 students – more than half of the total student population of Catalonia – and is the second largest in terms of students number in Spain. The University of Barcelona has four campuses, in different parts of the city. The University is the main Spanish university research centre, and one of the leaders in Europe, in terms of projects and the quality achieved in this field. One of the aims of the University is to create, transmit and expand the cultural, scientific, and technical knowledge and to contribute to society’s development.

The university is particularly interested in fostering international relations, and for many years has been the leader among European universities in numbers of student exchanges organized as part of the Erasmus program. Since 1995, the UB has implemented a quality program aiming fundamentally to design mid and long term strategies in order to evaluate and improve teaching and research in public higher education.

For more information about University of Barcelona, visit http://www.ub.edu/.

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons
[email protected]

Ignasi Labastida i Juan (Barcelona)
Project Lead, iCommons Spain
University of Barcelona
[email protected]

Glenn Otis Brown
Executive Director (Palo Alto)
1.650.723.7572 (tel)
1.415.336.1433 (cell)
[email protected]

http://creativecommons.org

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Creative Commons expands to Croatia with Multimedia Institute (mi2)

Matt Haughey, February 26th, 2004

Multimedia Institute (mi2) will lead the license translation and work to expand global access to Croatia’s culture

Palo Alto, USA, and Zagreb, CROATIA – Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative works free for copying and re-use, announced today that it would expand its International Commons (iCommons) project to Croatia. Multimedia Institute (mi2), in Zagreb, will lead the effort.

“Croatia has already demonstrated an extraordinary range of creative
use of new technology,” said Lawrence Lessig, Chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at Stanford. “We’re eager to work with iCommons
Croatia to support that work.”

“It’s liberating for Croatia to participate in this global effort to create a common space for creativity, especially at a time when legislative regimes often overlook this public good,” said Diana Kovacevic, project lead.

First announced in March 2003, iCommons is Creative Commons’ project to make its machine-readable copyright licenses useful worldwide. As the lead institution, (mi2) will coordinate a public effort literally and legally to translate the Creative Commons licenses for use in Croatia. (mi2) will field comments on an archived email discussion at the Creative Commons website, http://www.creativecommons.org/discuss#croatia.

Croatia joins Brazil, China, Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Taiwan and the United Kingdom in the iCommons effort.

More About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or in the public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org/.

For more information about iCommons, see http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

More About Multimedia Institute (mi2)

(mi2) sprang up in 1999 as a spin-off of the Internet program of Open Society Institute Croatia. Entering locally uncharted territory between social and cultural action and new technological developments, (mi2) brought together an emerging generation of civil activists, media practitioners, urban culture actors and social and media theorists who set out to pursue two principle tasks:

1) To promote and educate in media and technological practices relevant for the functioning and development of a social and cultural sector, and

2) To promote and develop socially inflected approaches to new technologies, especially as investments in the local emerging market gradually increased the penetration of new media and introduced the domination of commercial standards.

Over the past two years, (mi2) has become increasingly involved in cooperative activities at the local, regional and international levels to strengthen the cultural scene and advocate on behalf of the public domain. It is working towards initiating structural changes in a wide range of areas, including: non-institutional culture, informal education, technology, intellectual property rights, and access to public resources.

For more information about (mi2), visit http://www.mi2.hr/.

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons
[email protected]

Diana Kovacevic, (Zagreb)
Co-Project Lead, iCommons Croatia
[email protected]

Tomislav Medak, (Zagreb)
Co-Project Lead iCommons Croatia
[email protected]

Glenn Otis Brown
Executive Director (Palo Alto)
[email protected]

http://creativecommons.org

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Creative Commons Expands to France with CERSA

Matt Haughey, December 5th, 2003

CERSA (Research Center in Administrative Science) will lead the license translation and work to expand global access to French culture.

Palo Alto, USA; Paris, FRANCE; Tokyo, JAPAN — Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative works free for copying and re-use, announced today the expansion of its International Commons (iCommons) project to France. CERSA, a French research center dedicated to administrative sciences, will lead the effort.

“We’re very excited to have CERSA lead iCommons in France,” said Lawrence Lessig, Chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at Stanford, from Tokyo, where he is promoting Creative Commons’ international projects this week. “France is the latest country to join our most exciting project — to build an international cultural commons.”

“We are glad to host iCommons and to propose user-friendly, alternative licensing terms to authors. Our research group shares Creative Commons’ vision to associate digital code and legal code,” said Melanie Dulong de Rosnay, project lead of iCommons in France. Jean-Baptiste Soufron, co-project lead of iCommons in France, added: “We are very pleased to introduce the French version of the Creative Commons licenses. It was interesting not only to translate them, but also to adapt the licenses for full compatibility with our legal system.”

Announced in March 2003, iCommons is Creative Commons’ project to make its machine-readable copyright licenses useful worldwide. As the lead institution, CERSA will co-ordinate a public effort to adapt the Creative Commons licenses for use in France. CERSA will field comments on an archived email discussion at the Creative Commons website. See http://www.creativecommons.org/discuss#france.

France joins Brazil, Italy, Ireland, Finland, Japan, China, and Taiwan in the iCommons effort.

More about Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org/.

For more information about iCommons, see
http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

More about CERSA

Founded in 1967, the Research Center in Administrative Science (CERSA) is a joint research institute of the University of Paris 2 and the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS). Dedicated to the study of administrative phenomena at all levels, CERSA is host to researchers in public law, political science, and sociology. The research group in Information Technologies, Law and Linguistics (IDL) works on Information Technologies regulation, governance, normative process and legal modelling. It also develops cognitive interfaces and applications within local and European projects and networks.

For more information about CERSA, please visit http://www.cersa.org/.

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons
[email protected]

Melanie Dulong de Rosnay (Paris)
Project Lead iCommons, CERSA
[email protected]

Jean-Baptiste Soufron, (Paris)
Co-Project Lead iCommons, CERSA
[email protected]

Glenn Otis Brown (Palo Alto)
Executive Director, Creative Commons
[email protected]

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New Strides for iCommons Japan

Matt Haughey, December 2nd, 2003

Date is set for release of official Japanese licenses; Creative Commons’ website now offers Japanese translation of license selection process

Tokyo, JAPAN — The Creative Commons Japan licenses will roll out on January 15, 2004, announced GLOCOM, the Japanese research institute leading the Silicon Valley nonprofit’s efforts here. Creative Commons also unveiled a Japanese translation of its licensing process, available now on its website for use with the general Creative Commons licenses.

“Building an international commons is our most important mission,” said Lawrence Lessig, Creative Commons’ chairman and professor of law at Stanford University, in Tokyo this week to promote Creative Commons’ various international projects. “GLOCOM has been the key to our launching the iCommons in Japan, and Japan is critical to our strategy internationally.”

“We are very happy to be among the first iCommons participants,” said Motohiro Tsuchiya, member of Creative Commons Japan and associate professor at GLOCOM, International University of Japan. “This is a collective work of many ‘commoners’ here in Japan, who have a unique culture of sharing creative works such as comics, animations, haikus, and more. It makes it easier for us to understand the spirit of Creative Commons.”

The Creative Commons Japan team today made its latest drafts of the Japanese licenses available for public review from the Creative Commons website, (see http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/jp/), and Creative Commons released its first content-negotiated translation of its licensing process.

Japanese-speaking visitors to the Creative Commons site now automatically view a full translation of the license choice process as the site detects the users’ web browser settings. More translations will follow shortly, said Creative Commons. (For the translated text, see: http://creativecommons.org/license/?lang=ja.)

About GLOCOM

GLOCOM was established in 1991 as a social science research institute specializing in the study of information society as well as Japanese society. From the outset it was thought that the collection and dissemination of information through the utilization of computer networks was important, and this goal was realized in 1993 when the center established an Internet connection. Ever since, by utilizing the most up-to-date information and communication technologies, GLOCOM has been able to engage in various research activities, including generation of policy proposals and involvement in education-related projects. GLOCOM has set out to be a modern information “intelprise,” an institution promoting the distribution and sharing of “wisdom.”

More at http://www.glocom.ac.jp/.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of
intellectual works — whether owned or public domain. It is sustained by the
generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and
Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org/.

Contact

Motohiro Tsuchiya
iCommons Japan Project Lead, GLOCOM
[email protected]

Christiane Asschenfeldt
iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons
[email protected]

Glenn Otis Brown
Executive Director, Creative Commons
1.650.725.2565 (tel)
[email protected]

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Brazilian Government First to Adopt New “CC-GPL”

Matt Haughey, December 2nd, 2003

The Brazilian Committee for the Implementation of Free Software will release code under the Free Software Foundation’s General Public License, with Creative Commons providing new human- and machine-readable packaging

Rio de Janeiro, BRAZIL, and Tokyo, JAPAN — The government of Brazil today announced its adoption of the CC-GPL, an innovation on the Free Software Foundation’s (FSF) General Public License, for the release of publicly funded software. Brazil is the first adopter of the new CC-GPL, which combines the proven utility and popularity of the GPL with Creative Commons’ innovative user interface.

“Brazil’s adoption of the CC-GPL is extremely significant,” said Lawrence Lessig, Creative Commons’ chairman and professor of law at Stanford University, from Tokyo, where Creative Commons is presenting its projects in Japan this week. “Brazil has recognized that code produced and funded by the people should be made available to the people, and it has pioneered a tool that provides the best of both the Free Software Foundation and Creative Commons.”

“Brazilian government adoption of the GPL is an enormous step forward in the cause of software freedom,” said Professor Eben Moglen of Columbia Law School and General Counsel of the Free Software Foundation. “We welcome the chance to work together with Creative Commons to make the GNU GPL even more attractive to governments, which are recognizing that the principle of ‘share and share alike’ is the most efficient, most equitable, and most pro-development licensing strategy for software the public pays to create or to acquire.”

The first piece of software Brazil will release under the CC-GPL is TerraCrime 1.0, which analyzes and creates statistical reports on criminal activity in a particular geographic area, cross-referencing the data with other variables such as population, time of the incident, etc. The software was developed by the Laboratorio de Estatistica Espacial (LESTE — Spacial Statistics Laboratory) of the the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG) and by the Divisao de Processamento de Imagens (DPI — Image Processing Division) of the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE — National Institute of Space Research).

With the CC-GPL, Creative Commons has applied its three-layer user interface to the FSF’s classic software license. First is the Commons Deed, a plain-language summary of the GPL’s key terms. Next is the Legal Code, the full license in all its detail — in this case, the General Public License, provided in both English and a Portuguese translation by the Brazilian government. Third is Creative Commons’ metadata, a machine-readable expression of the license, so that users can search for and sort CC-GPL-licensed code by terms of use.

Lessig said Creative Commons and the FSF will begin offering the CC-GPL to the general public shortly.

About the Brazilian Committee for the Implementation of Free Source Software

The Information Technology Institute (ITI – Instituto de Tecnologia da Informacao) is an administrative entity connected directly with the Presidency of the Republic in Brazil. It has appointed a Committee for the Implementation of Free Software, and it is responsible for steering the free software policy in Brazil.

About the Free Software Foundation (FSF)

FSF is the principal organizational sponsor of the GNU Project, an effort launched in 1984 to develop a complete Unix-like operating system which is free software: the GNU system. (GNU is a recursive acronym for “GNU’s Not Unix”; it is pronounced “guh-noo.”) Variants of the GNU operating system which use the kernel Linux are now widely deployed; though these systems are often referred to as “Linux,” they are more accurately called GNU/Linux systems. The Foundation also develops, publishes, and secures compliance with the GNU General Public License (GNU GPL) and GNU Lesser General Public License (GNU LGPL), which are the world’s most widely used free software licenses.

For more, see http://gnu.org/.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of
intellectual works — whether owned or public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org/.

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Italy Builds Out the Creative Commons

Matt Haughey, November 18th, 2003

The Department of Law at the University of Turin will lead the license translation, while the CNR Institute of Electronics and Information and Telecommunications Engineering (IEIIT-CNR) will take the tech lead.

Palo Alto, USA and Turin, Italy — Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative works free for copying and re-use, announced today that it would expand its International Commons (iCommons) project to Italy.

“We’re very excited to have Turin’s Department of Law working with us to bring iCommons to Italy,” said Lawrence Lessig, Chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at Stanford, at the CSI-Piemonte convention on ‘Knowledge as Public Common Property.’ “Our cultural commons, needless to say, would not be complete without their participation.”

“In a world where the space for creativity is shrinking dangerously, Creative Commons is acting to keep this area open. There was a dire need for this initiative, and we are proud to participate in the project,” explained Professor Marco Ricolfi, project lead and professor of intellectual property law at the University of Turin.

Professor Marco Ajmone Marsan, Director of IEIIT-CNR said: “We are glad to offer the technical skills of our Institute in the field of Information and Communication Technologies to support the activities of Creative Commons in Italy.”

First announced in March this year, iCommons is Creative Commons’ project to make its machine-readable copyright licenses useful worldwide. As the affiliate institution for iCommons in Italy, Turin’s Department of Law will coordinate public efforts to translate the Creative Commons licenses literally and legally — so that they are accessible in the Italian language and suit the Italian legal system.

In taking up iCommons, Italy joins Brazil, Japan, Finland, Ireland, China, and Taiwan in the international effort.

The Department of Law at the University of Turin will field comments in archived email discussions on the Creative Commons website:

http://www.creativecommons.org/discuss#italy

More about Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org/.

For more information about iCommons, see http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

More About the Department of Law at the University of Turin

The Department of Law at the University of Turin, headed by Professor Gianmaria Ajani, coordinates legal research activity at the University of Turin. The Department also deals with fundraising for research purposes, the management of all PhD programs and continuing education in the area of law. It is part of the University of Turin, which, founded in 1404, is one of the oldest universities in the world. Today the University boasts 65,000 students, 1,300 professors, and nearly 800 researchers and assistants.

The Department of Law coordinates the research work of more than 130 law professors in different areas of law.

At present, the main research programs are in the fields of:

  • EC Private Law and Harmonization of Contract Law;
  • International Human Rights;
  • Criminal Jurisdiction;
  • Harmonization of Civil Procedure; and
  • Intellectual Property Law.

For more information about the Department of Law at the University of Turin, please visit:

http://www.dsg.unito.it/.

More about IEIIT-CNR

The Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (National Research Council of Italy), founded in 1923, is a multidisciplinary public research institution. The IEIIT is a CNR institute founded in 2002 by merging the forces of several preexisting CNR institutes and centers.

The IEIIT-CNR headquarters are located in Torino, with territorial sections in Genoa, Milan, Bologna and Pisa; the Institute is directed by professor Marco Ajmone Marsan. The IEIIT-CNR pursues advanced, multidisciplinary research in the field of information and communications technology (ICT).

For more information about IEIIT-CNR, please visit:

http://www.ieiit.cnr.it/.

Contacts

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
Creative Commons, iCommons Coordinator
[email protected]

Prof. Marco Ricolfi (Torino)
iCommons Italy Project Lead, Legal aspects
Department of Law, University of Turin
[email protected]

Marco Ciurcina (Torino)
iCommons Italy, Legal aspects
Lawyer, University of Turin
[email protected]

Antonio Amelia (Milano)
iCommons Italy, Legal aspects
Trainee Lawyer
[email protected]

Juan Carlos De Martin (Torino)
iCommons Italy, Technical aspects
Principal Research Scientist, IEIIT-CNR
[email protected]

Lorenzo De Tomasi (Sesto Calende, Varese)
iCommons Italy, Communication and creative initiatives
Communication Designer
[email protected]

Glenn Otis Brown (Palo Alto)
Creative Commons, Executive Director
[email protected]

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Creative Commons Expands to Ireland with University College Cork

Matt Haughey, November 17th, 2003

University College Cork will lead the license translation and work to expand global access to Irish culture.

Palo Alto, USA, and Cork, Ireland — Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative works free for copying and re-use, announced today the expansion of its International Commons (iCommons) project to Ireland. University College Cork (UCC) will lead the effort.

“We’re very excited to have University College Cork lead iCommons in Ireland,” said Lawrence Lessig, Chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at Stanford. “Their participation is crucial to our growing effort to promote an international cultural commons.”

“We look forward to cooperating with the Creative Commons project,” said Dr. Darius Whelan, project lead of iCommons in Ireland and Lecturer in Law at University College Cork Law Faculty. “This way we will enable creators of original works to disseminate that work widely through the Internet for the benefit of everyone,” said Louise Crowly co-project lead of iCommons in Ireland and Lecturer in Law at University College Cork Law Faculty.

Announced in March 2003, iCommons is Creative Commons’ project to make its machine-readable copyright licenses useful worldwide. As the lead institution, UCC will coordinate a public effort to adapt the Creative Commons licenses for use in Ireland. UCC will field comments on an archived email discussion at the Creative Commons website http://www.creativecommons.org/discuss#ireland.

Ireland joins Brazil, Japan, Finland, China, and Taiwan in the iCommons effort.

More about Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

For more information about iCommons, see http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

More about University College Cork

University College Cork (UCC) was founded in 1845 and is one of the constituent universities of the National University of Ireland. It was recently named Irish University of the Year 2003 by The Sunday Times.

UCC Law Faculty has an active research record in all areas of law and offers two specialized LL.M. programs — one in e-Law and Commercial Law and one in Criminal Justice. UCC Law Faculty is also actively involved in making laws available online, hosting the Irish office of the British and Irish Legal Information Institute (www.bailii.org), and operating the Irish Legal Information Initiative site (www.irlii.org) and Irish Law Site (www.irishlaw.org).

For more information about UCC Law Faculty, please visit http://www.ucc.ie/law/.

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Second Life Residents To Own Digital Creations

Matt Haughey, November 14th, 2003

Linden Lab Preserves Real World Intellectual Property Rights of Users of its Second Life Online Service

NEW YORK CITY: Linden Lab, creator of online world Second Life, today announced a significant breakthrough in digital property rights for its customers and for users of online worlds. Changes to Second Life’s Terms of Service now recognize the ownership of in-world content by the subscribers who make it. The revised TOS allows subscribers to retain full intellectual property protection for the digital content they create, including characters, clothing, scripts, textures, objects and designs.

In addition, Second Life has committed to exploring technologies to make it easy for creators to license their content under Creative Commons licenses.

Speaking to an audience of digital rights specialists and virtual world enthusiasts at the NYLS “State of Play” conference, Founder and CEO Philip Rosedale described the new policy as a major breakthrough for users of online worlds.

“Until now, any content created by users for persistent state worlds, such as EverQuest or Star Wars Galaxies, has essentially become the property of the company developing and hosting the world,” said Rosedale. “We believe our new policy recognizes the fact that persistent world users are making significant contributions to building these worlds and should be able to both own the content they create and share in the value that is created. The preservation of users’ property rights is a necessary step toward the emergence of genuinely real online worlds.”

Unlike traditional online game environments where anything created in-world is owned by the service provider, Second Life has responded to its residents’ desire to own their work just as they would any other original creations. Under these terms they can create, and sell derivative works based on content they’ve made, or license the work to others.

Second Life residents began creating their world in October, 2002 as beta testers, and continued through commercial launch of the service in June 2003. In just over a year, more than 10,000 users have created a richly diverse world, filled with more than 200,000 objects, complex characters, a range of living situations from whimsical hobbit-style homes to urban apartments, to sprawling mansions, and special recreational areas including a 40-ride amusement park and an island retreat. Everything in the world, from the antique carousel to the hot race cars to the resident-abducting alien spaceship was designed and built by the residents.

The economy supporting this activity includes over 12,000 objects for sale. Each month, nearly 100,000 user-to-user transactions for goods and services take place, with more than Linden$19million in in-world currency changing hands.

“Linden Lab has taken an important step toward recognizing the rights of content generators in Second Life,” said Lawrence Lessig, Stanford University Professor of Law, and Founder of the Stanford Center for Internet and Society. “As history has continually proven, when people share in the value they create, greater value is derived for all. Linden Lab is poised for significant growth as a result of this decision.”

About Linden Lab

Based in San Francisco, Linden Lab was founded in 1999 by Philip Rosedale to create a revolutionary new form of shared 3D entertainment. The former CTO of RealNetworks, Rosedale pioneered the development of many of today’s streaming media technologies, including RealVideo. In April 2003, noted software pioneer Mitch Kapor, founder of Lotus Development Corporation, was named Chairman.

Second Life launched in June 2003 after being named a Time Magazine “Coolest Invention of 2002″ during its beta test. Currently available to all PC users via a download at www.SecondLife.com, the world of Second Life, which grows with the size of the community, is now close to 1000 virtual acres and by the end of 2004 should be as large as Manhattan. A Macintosh version is expected early in 2004.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the Hewlett Foundation, and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society. For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

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Berklee College Of Music Launches “Berklee Shares” – A Ground-breaking

Matt Haughey, November 12th, 2003

The world-renowned music college encourages people to share music lessons
via file-sharing networks

Boston, Massachusetts USA – Berklee College of Music,
the world’s largest independent music college and the premier institution
for the study of contemporary music, announces the launch of Berklee
Shares. The groundbreaking new program provides free music lessons under
Creative Commons licenses and encourages musicians to share and
distribute the lessons online. The Berklee Shares lessons consist of a
growing catalog of MP3s, QuickTime movies, and PDF files derived from
curriculum developed at the college by its world-renowned faculty. The
lessons are available for download today at
http://www.berkleeshares.com/, affiliate partner sites, and
peer-to-peer networks, including Limewire.

“Berklee Shares was born out of Berklee College of Music’s commitment to
furthering music education through innovative means,” said Dave Kusek,
Associate Vice President. “Offering free education on the Internet and
through file sharing networks underscores the college’s core beliefs that
these channels are an effective way to openly distribute meaningful
educational content to a global audience, as well as serve as a powerful
promotional platform for artists to market, distribute, and sell their
music.”

The Berklee Shares program launches with over 80 music lessons spanning
instrument performance, music production and technology, songwriting and
arranging, music business and careers, music education and improvisation.
The number of lessons offered will expand over time.

“Berklee College of Music will prove to many the innovation and education
that can be supported through a more balanced system of rights,” said
Lawrence Lessig, chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at
Stanford University. “We are honored to help Berklee College spread
educational content broadly.”

About Berklee College of Music

Berklee College of Music was founded on the revolutionary principle that
the best way to prepare students for careers in music is through the
study and practice of contemporary music. For over half a century, the
college has evolved constantly to reflect the state of the art of music
and the music business. With over a dozen performance and nonperformance
majors, a diverse and talented student body representing 70 plus
countries, and a music industry “who’s who” of alumni, Berklee is the
world’s premier learning lab for the music of today and tomorrow.

http://www.berklee.edu/

About Berkleemusic

Berkleemusic.com is Berklee’s online music school, delivering online
access to world-renowned music faculty, educational concepts, and
time-tested curriculum previously available only to on-campus students.
Berkleemusic.com expands music-education opportunities beyond the campus
experience using the newest methods, media, and technology.
Berkleemusic.com is the first online music school seamlessly combining
education and career development to give musicians, educators and music
industry professionals a one-stop destination for all their learning,
career, and networking needs.

http://www.berkleemusic.com/

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of
intellectual works – whether owned or public domain. It is sustained by
the
generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and
Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative
Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space,
and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Karen DeMarco
MPRm Public Relations/Berklee
323-933-3393 (tel)
[email protected]

Glenn Otis Brown
Executive Director, Creative Commons
1.650.723.7572 (tel)
[email protected]

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