Press Releases

Nature Publishing Group expands support for Creative Commons

Eric Steuer, January 11th, 2011

Nature Publishing Group (NPG) and Creative Commons are pleased to announce an ongoing agreement to support the work of Creative Commons (CC). NPG today pledges an annual donation to CC. This will be equivalent to $20 for every article processing charge (APC) paid for publication in any of the 20 journals owned by NPG with an open access option, up to a maximum of $100,000 a year.

“It’s imperative that those who contribute true value in the communication of the results of research have their rights protected while promoting access as far as possible,” says Philip Campbell, Editor-in-Chief of Nature and Nature Publishing Group. “Creative Commons is a key contributor to that ethos, and I am delighted that we at Nature Publishing Group will be adding our support in this way.”

This builds on the announcement last week that NPG will make a donation to CC of $20 per APC for articles published in Scientific Reports, its newest open access publication. NPG has kick-started its wider support with a donation of $15,560 to CC’s current funding drive. This is equivalent to $20 per APC for all 778 open access papers published by NPG, from when it started offering open access publishing options to its authors in 2005, to the end of 2010.

“NPG is taking this step as part of our ongoing commitment to open access,” says Jason Wilde, Business Development Director at NPG. “We feel that it is important to support the legal framework behind open access, particularly given that we and many other publishers rely on the work of CC to license open access content.”

As of January 2011, NPG publishes 45 journals that have an open access option, or are entirely open access. Twenty are wholly owned by the publisher, and it is these journals that the CC agreement will apply to. For each APC paid on these journals, NPG will donate $20 to CC. NPG is currently in discussion with its academic and society partners, and with their agreement expects to expand the program to society-owned journals in the coming months.

“NPG’s commitment to making knowledge available to share and build upon is commendable all on its own – I’m thrilled that the company is taking the innovative next step of financially supporting Creative Commons’ work. CC’s tools make sharing easy and legal, and NPG’s support for what we do demonstrates that it is deeply dedicated to realizing the potential of open access.” commented Cathy Casserly, CEO, Creative Commons.

Authors of the research paper concerned will be eligible for complimentary membership of the CC network. Joining CC gives authors access to a network of other individuals who share a belief in the power of open systems to enhance innovation. Creating profiles on the CC network allows authors to expose their work to an international community of open access supporters and leading thinkers. To claim their membership, authors simply need to contact CC with the DOI of their article. This membership offer is retrospective, and open to all authors of every open access article published in NPG journals from 2005 to the end of 2010.

NPG now offers an open access option on 51% of its portfolio of 88 journals. In addition, NPG encourages self-archiving, in line with its license to publish, and offers a free manuscript deposition service to PubMed Central and UK PubMed Central on 43 titles.

About Nature Publishing Group (NPG):
Nature Publishing Group (NPG) is a publisher of high impact scientific and medical information in print and online. NPG publishes journals, online databases and services across the life, physical, chemical and applied sciences and clinical medicine.

Focusing on the needs of scientists, Nature (founded in 1869) is the leading weekly, international scientific journal. In addition, for this audience, NPG publishes a range of Nature research journals and Nature Reviews journals, plus a range of prestigious academic journals including society-owned publications. Online, nature.com provides over 5 million visitors per month with access to NPG publications and online databases and services, including Nature News and NatureJobs plus access to Nature Network and Nature Education’s Scitable.com.

Scientific American is at the heart of NPG’s newly-formed consumer media division, meeting the needs of the general public. Founded in 1845, Scientific American is the oldest continuously published magazine in the US and the leading authoritative publication for science in the general media. Together with scientificamerican.com and 16 local language editions around the world it reaches over 3 million consumers and scientists. Other titles include Scientific American Mind and Spektrum der Wissenschaft in Germany.

Throughout all its businesses NPG is dedicated to serving the scientific and medical communities and the wider scientifically interested general public. Part of Macmillan Publishers Limited, NPG is a global company with principal offices in London, New York and Tokyo, and offices in cities worldwide including Boston, Buenos Aires, Cairo, Delhi, Mumbai, Hong Kong, Madrid, Barcelona, Munich, Heidelberg, Basingstoke, Melbourne, Paris, San Francisco, Seoul and Washington DC. For more information, please go to www.nature.com.

About Creative Commons (CC):
Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

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Creative Commons launches Public Domain Mark; Europeana and Cultural Heritage Institutions lead early adoption

Diane Peters, October 11th, 2010

San Francisco, California, USA; The Hague, Netherlands — 11 October 2010

Today, Creative Commons announces the release of the Public Domain Mark, a tool that enables works free of known copyright restrictions to be labeled in a way that clearly communicates that status to the public, and allows the works to be easily discovered over the Internet. The Public Domain Mark effectively increases the value of the public domain by making works that are already free of copyright readily accessible to the public. The Mark makes it clear to teachers and students, artists and scientists, that they are free to re-use material. Its release benefits everyone who wishes to build upon the rich and vast resources that are part of the shared public domain.

Europeana – Europe’s digital library, museum and archive – is the first major adopter of the Public Domain Mark. The tool will become the standard mark for works free of known copyright that are shared via the Europeana portal, playing an important infrastructural role in the EU’s efforts to ensure that all works shared online are marked with rights information. Europeana, whose partners include the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, the Bibliothèque nationale de France and Germany’s Bundesarchiv (Federal archives), estimates that the millions of out-of-copyright works made accessible via its searchable database will be labelled with the Public Domain Mark by mid-2011. Europeana will announce the adoption of the Public Domain Mark at the upcoming Europeana Open Culture 2010 Conference, to be held 14-15 October in Amsterdam.

“The Public Domain Mark is a further step on the path towards making the promise of a digital public domain a reality,” said Michael Carroll, a founding board member of Creative Commons and a law professor at American University. “Marking and tagging works with information about their copyright status is essential. Computers must be able to parse the public domain status of works to communicate its usefulness to the public. The metadata standard underpinning the Public Domain Mark and all of CC’s licensing and legal tools are what makes this possible.”

“An important part of our mandate is to ensure that digitized works made available through Europeana are properly labelled with rights information, including when a work is free of known copyright restrictions so that teachers, students and others can freely use it in their work, changing it and remixing it as they wish,” noted Jill Cousins, Executive Director of Europeana. “The legal and technical rigour applied by Creative Commons throughout the development process makes the Public Domain Mark the natural choice for Europeana’s infrastructure. We have also worked with Creative Commons and our content providers to develop a Usage Guide for public domain works to help users of cultural content use it responsibly – by crediting the provider, among other things.”

The Public Domain Mark in its current form is intended for use with works that are free of known copyright around the world, primarily old works that are beyond the reach of copyright in all jurisdictions. Creative Commons is mapping the next phases of its public domain work, which will look at ways to identify and mark works that are in the public domain in a limited number of countries.

Creative Commons worked closely with Europeana and several of its members throughout the development of the Public Domain Mark. That process also included a public consultation period and review by CC’s worldwide affiliate network comprised of legal experts from more than 70 jurisdictions. The Public Domain Mark, to be used for marking works already free of copyright, complements Creative Commons’ CC0 public domain dedication, which provides an easy and reliable way for adding new works to the public domain prior to the expiry of copyright.

More information about the Public Domain Mark can be found on the Creative Commons website.


About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons’ public domain tools enhance the public domain by allowing cultural and other works that are free of known copyright to be easily discoverable over the Internet, and works to be dedicated to the public domain by their owners. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Google, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Mozilla Foundation, Omidyar Network, Red Hat, and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about supporting Creative Commons contact development@creativecommons.org.

Contact
Diane Peters
General Counsel, Creative Commons
diane@creativecommons.org
+1 415 369 8480


About Europeana

Europeana is a partnership of European cultural heritage associations that have joined forces to bring together the digitised content of Europe’s galleries, libraries, museums, archives and audiovisual collections. Currently Europeana’s interface is in 26 European languages and gives integrated access to 12 million books, films, paintings, museum objects and archival documents from some 1500 content providers. Europeana is funded mainly by the European Commission, and the content is drawn from every European member state.

The great majority of material digitised by Europe’s cultural and scientific heritage institutions is out-of-copyright. To clarify the legal issues around digitisation and contractual arrangements, Europeana released the Public Domain Charter. The Charter also reminds content providers and users that the great majority of our shared cultural heritage is out-of-copyright and can be freely re-used. It is a shared resource that society uses to generate ideas, develop knowledge and inspire creativity.

Contact
Jonathan Purday
Senior Communications Advisor, Europeana
jonathan.purday@bl.uk
Phone +31 70 314 0684
Mobile +44 7885 516234


Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/about/press/

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CC Vietnam Launches at Open CourseWare Consortium Global Meeting in Hanoi

Michelle Thorne, May 7th, 2010

Hanoi, Vietnam – May 7, 2010

Today marks the celebration of the localized Creative Commons licenses in Vietnam, the fifty-third jurisdiction worldwide to adapt the Creative Commons licensing suite to national law. The Vietnam Education Foundation together with D&N International and Creative Commons have overseen the localization of the licenses in consultation with the Vietnamese public and key stakeholders in the jurisdiction.

The launch will take place at the Creative Commons workshop on May 7 at 1:00pm during the Open CourseWare Consortium’s (OCWC) fifth annual conference in Melia Hotel. The three-day OCWC event brings together educators, administrators, policy makers, and other interested participants to examine the capacity of Open CourseWare to effect large-scale educational improvement worldwide. Many Open CourseWare and Open Educational Resources (OER) use Creative Commons licenses to grant copyright permission to easily access, adapt, and discover the materials.

“At a time when Vietnam Is taking great efforts to improve education and strengthen its creative industries, I see the Creative Commons launch providing a firm foundation on which to build Vietnam’s education and creative sector in the digital age,” says Dr. Lynne McNamara, Executive Director of the Vietnam Education Foundation. “We greatly appreciate the support of the OCWC as well for making this event possible.”

“CC Vietnam led a masterful consultation with the Vietnamese public and incorporated that feedback into the licenses. The team continues to connect diverse expertise and passions for the betterment of the local community. Creative Commons looks forward to the many promising developments in this dynamic and dedicated region,” notes Diane Peters, General Counsel of Creative Commons.

The next phase of CC Vietnam will focus on building multi-stakeholder groups to promote legal sharing in a variety of fields, such as photography, education, and music. Institutions and individuals in Vietnam are welcome to contribute to developing a roadmap for the national project and to join the launch’s proceedings on May 7.

About the Vietnam Education Foundation

The Vietnam Education Foundation (VEF) is an independent federal agency created by the U.S. Congress in December 2000 and funded annually by the U.S. Government. Its mission is to strengthen the U.S.-Vietnam bilateral relationship through educational exchanges in science and technology. For more information: http://www.vef.gov/
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About D&N International

Established in 1992, D&N International is a leading private law firm in Vietnam providing a wide range of intellectual property services to local and foreign clients.  Through nearly two decades together with its client support, D&N International has matured from a partnership of only two patent and trademark attorneys to a premier law firm with nation-wide presence and a representative office in France. Its business philosophy is to maintain the highest professional standards whilst providing clients with practical advice that adds value to their business. For more information: http://dnlaw.com.vn/.


About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Google, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Mozilla Foundation, Omidyar Network, Red Hat, and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about supporting Creative Commons, please contact  development@creativecommons.org.


Contact

Diane Peters
General Counsel, Creative Commons
171 Second Street, Suite 300
San Francisco, CA, USA 94105-3811
diane at creativecommons dot org

Dr. Phuong  Nguyen
Country Director, Vietnam Education Foundation (VEF)
Hanoi Towers, Suite 502
49
Hai Ba Trung, Hanoi
phuongnguyen at vef dot gov


Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/about/press/

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iPhone application released for the INTO INFINITY project

Cameron Parkins, November 18th, 2009

Creative Commons Japan + Appliya Studio + DubLab + Creative Commons + corde Japan, US, and worldwide — November 12th, 2009

Today, Creative Commons Japan and iPhone developer Appliya Studio announced the release of a brand new iPhone application, “AudioVisual Mixer for Into Infinity”, specially developed for the launch of the Into Infinity project in Japan. Into Infinity is a collaboration between Creative Commons and non-profit web radio collective Dublab.

Into Infinity comprises a collection of ready-to-remix 12-inch circular artworks and 8-second music loops created by a vast array of artists from around the world. Contributors include world-renowned graffiti artist Kofie, 2008 Whitney Biennial alumni Lucky Dragons, Anticon collective member Odd Nosdam, and electronic musicians Flying Lotus and DNTEL (AKA Jimmy Tamborello of The Postal Service). For its expansion to Japan, the Into Infinity project has additionally collected 50 “EAR” sound loops and 50 “EYE” visual circles from Japanese sound and visual artists (list below).

Creative Commons Japan teamed with APPLIYA on “AudioVisual Mixer for Into Infinity” to celebrate the growth of this free audio visual culture and to promote a more intuitive, open, and unique remix experience around Into Infinity’s Japan launch. The application was developed by Kensuke Sembo from internationally acclaimed media art duo Exonemo and Ages5&Up, an art and design collective known for witty yet solid interaction design.

When opened, the application connects to a server where all the project’s resources are stored, automatically downloading sound loops (“EAR”) that are paired with visual circles (“EYE”). The Into Infinity logo serves as an anchor point to trigger sounds: circles are moved by dragging them with your finger and when brought into the logo’s orbit the sounds start mixing. Here, the act of remixing is enabled by a simple touch interaction with the iPhone screen, allowing literally anyone to enjoy mixing or simply listen to the soundscape.

Users can share their mix instantly by posting to Twitter or by emailing their friends. An URL pointing to the mix generated is attached to the message so others can reenact your experience. You can also set the mix as your iPhone’s ring tone after downloading the mix to your home computer.

All mixes generated by the application’s users are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial license, keeping in line with the project as a whole.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/

iTunes AppStore information:
Title: AudioVisual Mixer for INTO INFINITY
Released: 12th November, 2009
Seller: Appliya
Copyright: dublab, Creative Commons, Creative Commons Japan

URL:

http://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewSoftware?id=338225050&mt=8

About Creative Commons Japan

Creative Commons Japan (CCJP) is an independent Japanese node of the Creative Commons movement active since 2004 mainly in Tokyo area. Besides porting the CC licenses to the japanese legal framework, CCJP has since then collaboratively worked with corporate entities, educational organizations and other non-profit groups in order to propel the open contents movement in Japan by organizing symposia, workshops, and consulting. In 2008 Summer, CCJP co-hosted the iSummit 2008 in the city of Sapporo and deployed an audio-visual remix contest with online video sharing services respectively run by Sony, Yahoo!, NTT, Nifty and FlipClip. In September 2009, CCJP has released a web survey for creators to research how the introduction of fair-use in Japanese copyright law is received and reported to a related working group of the Japan Agency for Cultural Affairs that most Web-aware users are welcoming a more open culture on the Net.
http://creativecommons.jp

About APPLIYA

APPLIYA works hand-in-hand with Japanese iPhone developers to bring the best in Japanese culture, design and ingenuity to the world through the international iPhone community. APPLIYA was founded in October 2008 with financial support from Softbank Inc., the exclusive mobile provider of the iPhone in Japan.
APPLIYA’s main product, APPLIYA STUDIO is an all-new service that allows anyone to easily build applications for the global iPhone/iPod Touch market. We offer fast, inexpensive options that make it easy for you to enter one of the world’s fastest growing marketplaces: the iTunes App Store.
http://appliya-studio.com/en/

About Corde

Corde is a creative collective led by music critique and producer Masaaki Hara that has been active in various fields such as label management, event organizing, writing and editing.

As a music label, soup-disk, the precedent of Corde, produced critical works by RiowArai, Suzukiski, Cappablack, Ill Suono, Inner Science, Conflict and contributed to the advancement of Japanese break beats and electronic music. soup-disk became disques corde in 2005, and started to produce undiscovered talents worldwide along with the release of such artists as RATN (Riow Arai + Tujiko Noriko) and Karafuto (a.k.a. Fumiya Tanaka). Current collaborating labels include Alpha Pup, Plug Research and Ubiquity.
As for event organizing, Corde has realized free-form parties titled “moxa” by inviting international artists such as Pole, Jan Jelinek, Opiate, The Weather(Busdriver, Radioinactive, Daedellus), Lusine, DavidLast, Nobody, Triosk, with the collaboration of Tokyo-based record shop Onsa Records. In 2008 and 2009, Corde realized the Japan tour of LOW END THEORY, the party from Los Angeles. As a writer, Hara published “To be freed from Music – Sound Recycle of the 21st century” in November 2009.

About Dublab

dublab is a non-profit web radio collective devoted to the growth of positive music, arts and culture. We have been broadcasting independently since 1999. More than 300,000 international listeners connect to our streams & podcasts monthly. dublab’s mission is to share beautiful music via the world’s best djs. What you hear on dublab crosses genres and defies classification. Unlike traditional radio, the dublab djs have total freedom of selection. You will experience many different sounds but find they all have the same soulful root. We have extended our creative action to include art exhibits, film projects, event production and record releases. The dublab echo continues to expand across the Earth.
http://dublab.com

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, the Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public.

For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org

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Creative Commons Publishes Study of “Noncommercial Use”

Mike Linksvayer, September 14th, 2009

San Francisco, California, USA — September 14, 2009

Creative Commons announces the publication of Defining “Noncommercial”: A Study of How the Online Population Understands “Noncommercial Use.” The report details the results of a research study launched in September 2008 to explore differences between commercial and noncommercial uses of content found online, as those uses are understood by various communities and in connection with a wide variety of content. Generous support for the study was provided by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

The study investigated understandings of noncommercial use and the Creative Commons “NC” license term through online surveys of content creators and users in the U.S., open access polls of global “Creative Commons Friends and Family,” interviews with thought leaders, and focus groups with participants from around the world who create and use a wide variety of online content and media. The research behind Defining “Noncommercial” was conducted by Netpop Research, under advisement from academics and a working group consisting of several Creative Commons jurisdiction project members as well as Creative Commons staff and board members.

Creative Commons provides free copyright licenses to creators who want to grant the public certain permissions to use their works, in advance and without the need for one-to-one contact between the user and the creator. “Noncommercial” or “NC” is one of four license terms that creators may choose to apply to CC-licensed content.

Creative Commons noncommercial licenses preclude use of a work “in any manner that is primarily intended for or directed toward commercial advantage or private monetary compensation.” The majority of respondents (87% of creators, 85% of users) replied that the definition was “essentially the same as” (43% of creators, 42% of users) or “different from but still compatible with” (44% of creators, 43% of users) theirs. Only 7% of creators and 11% of users replied that the term was “different from and incompatible with” their definition.

Other highlights from the study include the rating by content creators and users of different uses of online content as either “commercial” or “noncommercial” on a scale of 1-100, where 1 is “definitely noncommercial” and 100 is “definitely commercial.” On this scale, creators and users (84.6 and 82.6, respectively) both rate uses in connection with online advertising generally as “commercial.” However, more specific use cases revealed that many interpretations are fact-specific. For example, creators and users gave the specific use case “not-for-profit organization uses work on its site, organization makes enough money from ads to cover hosting costs” ratings of 59.2 and 71.7, respectively.

On the same scale, creators and users (89.4 and 91.7, respectively) both rate uses in which money is made as being commercial, yet again those ratings are lower in use cases specifying cost recovery or use by not-for-profits. Finally, both groups rate “personal or private” use as noncommercial, though creators did so less strongly than users (24.3 and 16.0, respectively, on the same scale).

In open access polls, CC’s global network of “friends and family” rate some uses differently from the U.S. online population—although direct empirical comparisons may not be drawn from these data. For example, creators and users in these polls rate uses by not-for-profit organizations with advertisements as a means of cost recovery at 35.7 and 40.3, respectively—somewhat more noncommercial. They also rate “personal or private” use as strongly noncommercial—8.2 and 7.8, respectively—again on a scale of 1-100 where 1 is “definitely noncommercial” and 100 is “definitely commercial.”

“As more people have begun to make, share, and use content online, the question of what constitutes a ‘commercial use’ versus a ‘noncommercial use’ has become increasingly important to understand,” said Josh Crandall, President of Netpop Research. “With this study, we were particularly interested to see that—contrary to what many might believe—there is little variation between creators and users in the perceived ‘commerciality’ of particular uses of copyrighted content. Furthermore, where they do differ, users tend to have a more conservative outlook than creators. This study provides useful data and perspectives—from both members of the general public and people who work closely in the world of copyright—that can help people begin to think more clearly about the issue.”

The study report and its associated data are available at http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Defining_Noncommercial, where members of the public can contribute feedback about the report. Defining “Noncommercial” is published under a Creative Commons Attribution license, and the research data is available under a CC0 public domain waiver.

“We’re excited that the results of this important project will be available for all kinds of uses—including commercial use—by anyone,” said Joi Ito, CEO of Creative Commons. “We encourage researchers and our community to use what we’ve done and expand this investigation further, building upon the data we collected and incorporating more perspectives from Creative Commons adopters worldwide.”

In the next years, possibly as soon as 2010, Creative Commons expects to formally launch a multi-year, international process for producing the next version (4.0) of the six main Creative Commons licenses. This process will include examination of whether the noncommercial definition included in licenses with the NC term should be modified or if other means of clarifying noncommercial use under the CC licenses should be pursued. The results of Defining “Noncommercial” and subsequent research will be an important thread informing this process.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Google, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Mozilla Foundation, Omidyar Network, Red Hat, and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about supporting Creative Commons, please contact development@creativecommons.org.

About Netpop Research, LLC

Netpop Research, LLC is a San Francisco-based strategic market research firm that specializes in online media, digital entertainment and user-generated content trends. Netpop Research has fielded numerous studies for major profit and nonprofit entities, and is the creator of the Netpop tracking study of Internet usage among broadband consumers in the United States and China.

Contact

Mike Linksvayer
Vice President
Creative Commons
ml@creativecommons.org
+1 415 369 8480

Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/about/press/

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YouTube’s Glenn Otis Brown Returns to Creative Commons as Board Member

Eric Steuer, July 24th, 2009

San Francisco, CA, USA – July 24, 2009

Creative Commons, a global nonprofit focused on the growth and preservation of openly shareable and reusable culture, science, and education, officially announced today that Glenn Otis Brown has rejoined the organization as a member of its board of directors. Brown was CC’s executive director from 2002-2005 and is currently YouTube’s music business development manager.

As one of the core members of the Creative Commons team in the organization’s early days, Brown was instrumental in developing many of CC’s earliest successes, including the first two versions of its machine-readable copyright licenses, its international expansion, and the remix-friendly Wired CD and accompanying Wired Magazine cover story. Brown subsequently joined Google as a products counsel, where he worked on projects including Google Image Search, Blogger, Google Talk, the Google WiFi initiative, and Google Sitemaps. As the music business development manager for YouTube, Brown works with major and independent labels, publishers, and artists to build new business opportunities around both official music videos and fan-made tributes.

“We couldn’t be more thrilled to have Glenn join the board,” says Creative Commons CEO Joi Ito. “As Executive Director of the organization in its early days, Glenn established many of the critical ideas and relationships that CC is built upon today. That background, combined with his experience in developing creative projects and partnerships at YouTube, gives him particularly valuable insight into the opportunities for Creative Commons in the worlds of business, media, and culture at large.”

“It’s great to be involved with Creative Commons again,” Brown says. “It’s both humbling and exciting to see how much the organization has grown in influence and reach. Seven years ago, there was no easy way for creative people to declare ‘Some Rights Reserved,’ to invite open interaction with their work, while keeping their copyrights. Today, Creative Commons is the go-to solution for safe, legal sharing for folks as different as Ridley Scott, Wikipedia, MIT, or President Obama’s transition team.”

Brown joins a board of directors that includes technologist Joi Ito, Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales, cyberlaw and intellectual property experts Lawrence Lessig, Michael Carroll, Molly Shaffer Van Houweling, and Eric Saltzman, Flickr founder Caterina Fake, MIT computer science professor Hal Abelson, documentary filmmaker Davis Guggenheim, and Public Knowledge founder Laurie Racine.

Glenn Otis Brown biography

Glenn Otis Brown is currently the music business development manager at YouTube. Before that, he worked as a products counsel at Google, where he worked on Google Image Search, Blogger, Google Talk, the Google WiFi initiative, and Google Sitemaps, among many other projects. Glenn was Executive Director of Creative Commons from summer 2002 through spring 2005. In 2003-2004, Glenn was a lecturer at Stanford Law School, where he co-taught a class on copyright licensing with Lawrence Lessig. He clerked for the Honorable Stanley Marcus on the Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, in Miami, where he worked on the Wind Done Gone copyright appeal, among other cases. Glenn has also worked stints at The Economist’s Washington D.C. bureau, reporting on general U.S. news during the 2000 elections, and at “Digital Age,” a New York public TV show hosted by Andrew Shapiro, where he was assistant producer for a season. Glenn graduated from the University of Texas at Austin (B.A.) and Harvard Law School (JD). Glenn was a member of the Harvard Law Review and worked at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society, where he organized the first Signal or Noise conference and concert in cooperation with the Electronic Frontier Foundation. He lives in San Francisco and plays in a band called Magic Me.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Eric Steuer
Creative Director, Creative Commons
eric@creativecommons.org

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Creators Celebrate Local Creative Commons Licenses in the Czech Republic

Michelle Thorne, April 15th, 2009

Prague, Czech Republic and Berlin, Germany

Creators in the Czech Republic can now publish and share their creative works using free Creative Commons (CC) tools adapted to Czech language and law.

The Czech Republic will become the fifty-second jurisdiction worldwide to offer localized Creative Commons licenses. Following extensive consultation with local and international legal experts and in close collaboration with Creative Commons International, Creative Commons Czech ported the licenses and will celebrate their launch on April 16 at an event during the Multiplace festival in Prague.

Already the Czech project is finding support from diverse content creators and curators keen to use the local licenses.

“Throughout the year it took to port the licenses, we established a strong coalition of people and groups from a range of backgrounds,” explains CC Czech Project Lead Marek Tichy. “The joint efforts of lawyers, librarians, musicians, teachers, artists, geeks, journalists and other specialists delivered not only what we were aiming for – the localized CC deeds and legal codes – but also proof that the ideas behind CC echo in many areas both professional and amateur. From archiving original Czech web content, to educational materials, to works from independent music producers and performers, CC opens up a wide spectrum of possibilities. There is no doubt the today’s launch is only the beginning of the Czech Creative Commons story.”

The launch event will be held in Prague’s DigiLab AVU on April 16 from 10:00am-4:00pm. It will feature a workshop on CC license usage, followed by a press conference and launch ceremony. Prominent speakers include Vít Richter (Deputy Director of the National Library of the Czech Republic), Jan Pavelka (Association of Independent Artists), Paul Keller (Creative Commons Netherlands), and Petr Kadlec (Wikimedia ČR).

Creative Commons Czech, led by Marek Tichy (Iuridicum Remedium), Lukáš Gruber (National Library of the Czech Republic), and Petr Jansa, was initiated as a part of Iuridicum Remedium’s project “Reclaim Your Rights in the Digital Age”, supported by CEE Trust. Creative Commons Czech has also received endorsement from the Copyright Department of the Ministry of Culture and Faculty of Philosophy and Arts, Charles University of Prague.

About Iuridicum Remedium

Iuridicum remedium (IuRe) is a non-governmental non-profit organization promoting human rights. It focuses on broad infringements of individual rights as a result of legislative action and also deals with specific cases of human rights violations. IuRe’s activities include current threats to human rights in the fields of Social Exclusion; Human Rights and Technologies; and Human Rights and Public Administration. IuRe is active in the areas of legislation and legal assistance, and disseminates information to both the professional community and the general public. Iuridicum Remedium is a member of EDRi, European Digital Rights network. For more information, visit http://www.iure.org/.

About the National Library of the Czech Republic

The National Library of the Czech Republic works on Creative Commons within its Webarchive. The Webarchive is a project which aims to archive the entire content of the Czech internet. Webarchive is dedicated to porting the Creative Commons licenses in order to resolve legal issues in making the archived content available to public. For more information, visit http://www.nkp.cz/ & http://www.webarchiv.cz/.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Dr. Catharina Maracke
Director, Creative Commons International
catharina@creativecommons.org

Press Kit
http://creativecommons.org/presskit
http://creativecommons.org/international/cz

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Esther Wojcicki Becomes Creative Commons Board Chair

Mike Linksvayer, April 1st, 2009

San Francisco, CA, USA — 04/01/2009

Noted educator, education innovator, and journalist today became Chair of the Creative Commons (CC) Board of Directors, taking over from founding board member James Boyle. Wojcicki first joined the board of Creative Commons last July. Creative Commons is a world wide non-profit organization that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works.

“I am thrilled to take on this new role,” said Wojcicki. “I strongly believe that the Creative Commons approach to sharing, reuse, and innovation has the power to totally reshape the worlds of education, science, technology, and culture at large. My main goal as chair is to make average Internet users worldwide aware of Creative Commons and to continue building the organization’s governance and financial resources. I am also very eager to help CC’s education push at high school and college journalism programs worldwide.”

Wojcicki is a journalism and English teacher at Palo Alto High School, where she leads one of the largest high school journalism programs in the nation. She leads a variety of award-winning journalism projects, including a newspaper, a magazine, a website, a television program, and a sports publication. Over the past 20 years, these projects have won Gold and Silver Crowns from Columbia Scholastic Press Association, the PaceMaker Award and Hall of Fame Award from National Scholastic Press, and best in nation from Time Magazine in 2003. In February 2009, she was awarded the Columbia Scholastic Press Association Gold Key Award in a special ceremony at Columbia University for “outstanding devotion to the cause of the school press … and service above and beyond the call of delegated duty.” She is the president of the Friends of the Lurdes Mutola Foundation to support girls’ education in Mozambique and is a consultant for the Silicon Valley Education Foundation and Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

The outgoing chair, James Boyle, expressed delight that Wojcicki has accepted the position. “Esther is a wonderful choice for Chair of Creative Commons. She brings so much to the table. She is an award winning teacher, a journalist, and someone who has spent her professional life exploring the connections between education and technology. She will keep us focused on making Creative Commons licenses simple and clear and on solving actual problems people have. What’s more, she will make sure we do a good job explaining what Creative Commons and Science Commons can actually do for the world. I am incredibly happy that we persuaded her to take the position.”

Boyle was on the original board of Creative Commons, serving from 2002 to 2009, the past year as chair, and was co-founder of Science Commons and ccLearn. He has stepped down from the board upon vacating the Chair. Boyle is a founder of the modern movement to recognize, protect, and grow the intellectual commons, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Law at Duke University, and author of the recent book The Public Domain: The Enclosing of the Commons of the Mind.

“I have been a Creative Commons board member from the beginning. Apart from raising my kids, my work with Creative Commons and Science Commons is one of my proudest accomplishments,” continued Boyle. “Though I will be stepping down from the board to focus on other projects, I will continue to be an ardent supporter of CC, both financially and professionally. I am excited about the organization’s future and I can’t think of a better person to lead us forward than Esther.”

Creative Commons CEO Joi Ito added that the appointment of Wojcicki to board chair marks an important step in the maturation of Creative Commons. “Esther’s ascension to chair demonstrates that we have successfully completed the leadership transition from visionary founders to a team that is operationally scaling that vision to become the global infrastructure for sharing in culture, education, and science,” Ito said.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Mike Linksvayer
Vice President, Creative Commons
ml@creativecommons.org
1-415-369-8480

Press Materials

http://creativecommons.org/about/press/

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Barriers to Sharing Lowered by Creative Commons Licenses in Thailand

Michelle Thorne, March 31st, 2009

Bangkok, Thailand and Berlin, Germany

Creative Commons Thailand has adapted the Creative Commons licenses to Thai law. The localized licenses, launching April 2, enable Thai creators to easily share creative works by lowering legal barriers and prohibitive transaction costs.

The Thai team, led by Mr. Phichai Phuechmongkol of Dharmniti Law Office (DLO), conducted the porting and public discussion of the Thai licenses with local and international legal experts. These efforts draw upon partners working pro-bono on the project from DLO, Change Fusion Institute, Thammasat University, and Prince of Songkla University, with generous support from the Thai Health Promotion Foundation’s ICT Plan for Online Health and Partner Support.

The localized licenses, the fifty-first completed worldwide, are the result of  close collaboration with Creative Commons International, the coordinator of Creative Commons’ global projects.

In a statement on the launch’s importance, CC Thailand explains, “Adoption of the six core Thai licenses will lead to a cordial climate for sharing knowledge and creative works. This climate is especially desirable in a developing nation such as Thailand, whose citizens are dedicated to a culturally sustainable society that is also open to integration and cooperation. The Creative Commons licenses will help Thai society achieve these goals by enabling practical and reasonable copyright protection, while facilitating  the  sharing, distribution,  use, and adaption of creative works both existing and newly-created.”

The launch will be held at the Bangkok Art and Culture Centre on April 2 from 1:00-4:00pm. It will feature a seminar on Free Culture and Open Models of Digital Distribution and a CC showcase. Project Leads Phichai Phuechmongkol and Sunit Shrestha will conduct opening remarks, followed by speeches from key supporters: Wanchat Padungrat (Pantip.com), Supap Rimthepathip (Creative New Media Network), and award-winning author Prabda Yoon.

CC Thailand also announces its outreach campaign. “This launch does not mark the end of our efforts. Rather, it is the beginning of an ambitious campaign to promote the licenses for Thai creators. Our network will reach out to diverse content providers and present them with the concept of free and open culture. We hope to eventually persuade them to revisit their licensing policies and consider more flexible, reasonable solutions like Creative Commons.”

About Dharmniti Law Office

Founded in 1947 by Pradit Premyothin and with the guidance of Buth Khandhawit in 1978, the Dharmniti Law Office Co., Ltd. (DLO) has become one of the most well-respected law offices in Thailand, providing quality legal services for both local and international clients. DLO offers a full range of legal services with a staff of over 100 persons including over 50 talented lawyers.

For more information about Dharmniti Law Office, visit http://www.thailandlawoffice.com/ (English) & http://www.dlo.co.th/ (Thai).

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public.

For more information about Creative Commons, visit
http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Dr. Catharina Maracke
Director
Creative Commons International
+49 302 191 582 66

Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/presskit

http://creativecommons.org/international/th

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ลดอุปสรรคในการแบ่งปันงานสร้างสรรค์ในประเทศไทย ด้วยสัญญาอนุญาตครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์

2 เมษายน 2552 – กรุงเทพ, ประเทศไทย และกรุงเบอร์ลิน, ประเทศเยอรมัน

เครือข่ายครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์ประเทศไทย ได้ปรับแก้สัญญาอนุญาตฉบับทั่วไปของครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์ ให้สอดคล้องกับกฎหมายไทยเสร็จเรียบร้อยแล้ว สัญญาอนุญาตสำหรับประเทศไทย ซึ่งจะเปิดตัว ในวันที่ 2 เมษายน ศกนี้ ทำให้ผู้สร้างสรรค์ชาวไทย สามารถแบ่งปันงานสร้างสรรค์ ได้ง่ายขึ้น โดยการลดค่าใช้จ่ายและอุปสรรคทางกฎหมายในการเผยแพร่งานสร้างสรรค์

คณะทำงานชาวไทย นำโดยคุณพิชัย พืชมงคล จากสำนักกฎหมายธรรมนิติ (Dharmniti Law Office : DLO) ได้ปรึกษาหารือกับผู้เชี่ยวชาญกฎหมายชาวไทยและต่างประเทศ อย่างเปิดเผยผ่านเวทีสาธารณะ และดำเนินการปรับแก้สัญญาอนุญาต แบบไม่มีค่าตอบแทน โดยได้รับความร่วมมือจากบุคคลและหน่วยงานจำนวนมาก เช่น สำนักกฎหมายธรรมนิติ, สถาบัน Change Fusion, มหาวิทยาลัยธรรมศาสตร์, และมหาวิทยาลัยสงขลานครินทร์ และได้รับการสนับสนุนจากแผนงาน ICT เพื่อสุขภาวะออนไลน์และภาคีเครือข่าย สำนักงานกองทุนสนับสนุนการสร้างเสริมสุขภาพ (สสส.)

สัญญาอนุญาตสำหรับประเทศไทย ซึ่งได้ปรับแก้ให้สอดคล้องกับกฎหมายท้องถิ่น เป็นลำดับที่ 51 ของโลก เป็นผลงานที่เกิดจากความร่วมมืออย่างใกล้ชิดระหว่างสำนักกฎหมายธรรมนิติ กับ Creative Commons International ซึ่งเป็นองค์กรประสานงานทางสากลของครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์

เครือข่ายครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์ประเทศไทย อธิบายถึงความสำคัญของการเปิดตัวสัญญาอนุญาตสำหรับประเทศไทยว่า ” สัญญาอนุญาตหลักหกฉบับสำหรับประเทศไทยนี้ จะส่งเสริมบรรยากาศในการแบ่งปันความรู้และงานสร้างสรรค์ ให้เสรีและเปิดกว้างมากยิ่งขึ้นในสังคมไทย บรรยากาศเช่นนี้ เป็นผลดีอย่างยิ่ง โดยเฉพาะต่อประเทศกำลังพัฒนาเช่นประเทศไทย ที่ซึ่งชาวไทย มุ่งหมายในการรักษาวัฒนธรรมของสังคมไทยให้ยั่งยืน แต่ก็เปิดกว้างในการร่วมมือและแลกเปลี่ยนกับสังคมอื่น ๆ  สัญญาอนุญาตของครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์ จะช่วยให้สังคมไทยบรรลุถึงเป้าหมายทั้งสองด้าน  คือการปกป้องคุ้มครองลิขสิทธิ์ในงานสร้างสรรค์ที่เหมาะสมและมีเหตุผล ในขณะเดียวกัน ก็อำนวยความสะดวกในการแบ่งปัน  เผยแพร่ ใช้และพัฒนางานสร้างสรรค์ ทั้งที่มีอยู่เดิมและที่จะสร้างขึ้นใหม่ ”

งานเปิดตัว จัดขึ้นในวันที่  2 เมษายน เวลา 13:00 – 16:00 น. ที่หอศิลปวัฒนธรรมแห่งกรุงเทพมหานคร  ในงานมีการเสวนาเรื่อง “วัฒนธรรมเสรีกับการเผยแพร่เงานสร้างสรรค์ดิจิทัลแบบเปิดกว้าง ” และตัวอย่างการใช้สัญญาอนุญาตครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์ คุณพิชัย พืชมงคล ผู้นำโครงการฯ และคุณสุนิตย์ เชรษฐา เป็นผู้กล่าวเปิดงาน ตามด้วยการอภิปรายของผู้สนับสนุน รายหลัก ๆ ได้แก่ คุณวันฉัตร ผดุงรัตน์ จากเว็บพันทิพดอทคอม (Pantip.com), คุณสุภาพ หริมเทพาธิป จากเครือข่ายสื่อใหม่สร้างสรรค์ และคุณปราบดา หยุ่น นักเขียนผู้ชนะรางวัล

เครือข่ายครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์ประเทศไทย ประกาศโครงการรณรงค์ส่งเสริมการใช้สัญญาอนุญาตครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์โดยกล่าวว่า  “การเปิดตัวสัญญาอนุญาตครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์  ไม่ได้หมายความว่า งานของเราเสร็จแล้ว หากแต่เป็นการเริ่มต้นของโครงการรณรงค์ที่ใหญ่กว่าเดิม ในการสนับสนุนผู้สร้างสรรค์ชาวไทย ให้นำสัญญาอนุญาตครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์ไปใช้กับงานสร้างสรรค์ของตน เครือข่ายฯ จะเข้าไปปรึกษาหารือกับผู้สร้างสรรค์งานประเภทต่างๆ  เพื่อนำเสนอแนวคิดวัฒนธรรมเสรีและเปิดกว้าง เราหวังว่า ในที่สุด จะสามารถชักชวนผู้สร้างสรรค์งานเหล่านั้น ให้ทบทวนแนวทางการอนุญาต และพิจารณาแนวทางที่ยืดหยุ่นและมีเหตุผล ด้วยการใช้สัญญาอนุญาตของครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์ ”

เกี่ยวกับสำนักกฎหมายธรรมนิติ

สำนักกฎหมายธรรมนิติ ก่อตั้งในปี 2490 โดยคุณประดิษฐ์ เปรมโยธิน จนเมื่อปี 2521 คุณบุศย์ ขันธวิทย์ ได้นำสำนักกฎหมายธรรมนิติ สู่การเป็นสำนักกฎหมายที่ได้รับความเชื่อถือมากที่สุดแห่งหนึ่งในประเทศไทย สำนักกฎหมายธรรมนิติ ให้บริการทางกฎหมายที่มีคุณภาพแก่ลูกค้าทั้งในประเทศและต่างประเทศ แบบครบวงจร ด้วยทีมงานมากกว่า 100 คน รวมถึงนักกฎหมายที่มีความสามารถมากกว่า 50 คน

สำหรับข้อมูลเพิ่มเติมเกี่ยวกับสำนักกฎหมายธรรมนิติ เข้าชมได้ที่ http://www.dlo.co.th/ (ภาษาไทย) และ http://www.thailandlawoffice.com/ (ภาษาอังกฤษ)

เกี่ยวกับครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์

ครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์ (Creative Commons) เป็นองค์กรประเภทไม่แสวงหาผลกำไร ก่อตั้งเมื่อปี 2544 เพื่อส่งเสริมการนำงานด้านศิลปะและวิชาการ ทั้งที่มีลิขสิทธิ์และที่เป็นสาธารณสมบัติ มาใช้งานซ้ำอย่างสร้างสรรค์ ครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์  เสนอให้นักเขียน ศิลปิน นักวิทยาศาสตร์และนักการศึกษา เลือกใช้สัญญาอนุญาตแบบต่าง ๆ  ซึ่งมีลิขสิทธิ์และไม่มีค่าใช้จ่าย  โดยยืดหยุ่นตามระดับความคุ้มครองและเสรีภาพที่เหมาะสม บนพื้นฐานของแนวคิด  “สงวนสิทธิ์บางประการ”  แทนที่การใช้สัญญาอนุญาตตามกฎหมายลิขสิทธิ์แบบดั้งเดิม ที่อยู่บนพื้นฐานของแนวคิด  “สงวนลิขสิทธิ์ “  ครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์ ก่อตั้งและได้รับการสนับสนุนอย่างมากจากหน่วยงานต่าง ๆ ได้แก่ ศูนย์เพื่อสาธารณะสมบัติ (Center for the Public Domain), เครือข่ายโอมิดยา (Omidya Network), มูลนิธิรอคกี้เฟลเลอร์ (Rockefeller Foundation), มูลนิธิจอห์น ดี. และคาเธอรีน ที. แมคอาร์เธอร์ (The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation), และมูลนิธิวิลเลียม และฟลอร่า ฮิวเล็ทท์ (The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation) รวมทั้งได้รับการสนับสนุนจากสาธารณะชนทั่วไป

สำหรับข้อมูลเพิ่มเติมเกี่ยวกับครีเอทีฟคอมมอนส์ เช้าชมได้ที่ http://creativecommons.org.

ติดต่อ

Dr. Catharina Maracke
Director
Creative Commons International
+49 302 191 582 66

ข้อมูลสำหรับสื่อ

http://creativecommons.org/presskit
http://creativecommons.org/international/th

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UNCENSORED INTERVIEW AND CREATIVE COMMONS TEAM UP TO GIVE FREE ACCESS TO ARTIST INTERVIEWS

Eric Steuer, March 9th, 2009

Thousands of Videos Featuring Musician Interviews Now Available Under CC’s Permissive Attribution License

New York, NY, USA and San Francisco, CA, USA — 03/09/2009

Today, Uncensored Interview, a video producer and licensor of musician interviews, announced a collaboration with Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization focused on building a body of openly shareable and reusable creative work, by releasing thousands of videos from its interview footage archive under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC-BY) license. Previously, Uncensored Interview’s library consisted of premium content available for commercial licensing, but now includes videos available via download in Ogg Theora, a free and open video compression format. Under CC-BY, users of the content are only required to give attribution to Uncensored Interview as the content source.

“This is a visionary move on the part of Uncensored Interview,” said Eric Steuer, creative director of Creative Commons. “By offering this vast and amazing body of work to the public under our most permissive license, the people behind Uncensored Interview are making a clear statement that allowing the sharing and creative reuse of material – even for commercial purposes – can enhance the value of that material for its creators. In promoting a “some rights reserved” approach to distribution, Uncensored Interview is opening up a wide variety of possibilities, and we’re very excited to see the kinds of projects that result from this pioneering effort.”

By working with Creative Commons, Uncensored Interview opens a direct line for fans to download, share, remix and promote select interview videos of their favorite artists. Uncensored Interview’s videos will be clearly marked as available via the CC license, while simultaneously providing a mechanism via the CC+ protocol for partners to seek out licensing permissions beyond those already granted.

“Consumers are not just consumers any more. They are creators and collaborators in their own right. By licensing our premium content under Creative Commons in Ogg Theora, we immediately enable use of our content as source material for online users while simultaneously promoting the artists and their points of view,” said Sander van Zoest, Chief Technology Officer for Uncensored Interview.

Many of the artists interviewed by Uncensored Interview are supporters of Creative Commons.

Gregg Gillis of Girl Talk said, “I think many people are starting to see the artistic and financial benefits of allowing their art and music to be appropriated and recontextualized. Creative Commons are making that whole process much easier.”

“Creativity is so often restricted by bureaucracy and financial matters. I think, CC can be a healthy solution for creative collaborations. It can help bridge the gap between the artist and fan, which I think would be a positive change”, said UK singer-songwriter Findlay Brown.

Uncensored Interview will release select interview videos under the Creative Commons license (CC-BY) on an ongoing basis. To download Uncensored Interview content, go to http://www.uncensoredinterview.com/topics/cc.

About Uncensored Interview

Uncensored Interview (http://www.uncensoredinterview.com), a subsidiary of ZenCat Productions, LLC, is a video production and licensing company focusing on the community of music artists and their fans. UI’s primary business is to produce interviews in a free-format style with musicians of all genres and license high-definition quality footage to partner companies. UI beta launched in November 2007 and has created distribution relationships with all areas of the music and digital industry, including broadcast networks, digital retail hubs, the music blogosphere, leading major and indie music labels and prominent music festivals and tours. Uncensored Interview has been recognized for many awards including the SXSW Interactive Web Awards and the Webby Awards. UI has interviewed hundreds of acclaimed acts including Stereolab, Hercules and Love Affair, The Kooks, Vivian Girls, The New Pornographers, Dizzee Rascal, Lykke Li and many more.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Melinda Lee
Chief Content Officer, Uncensored Interview
Email

Eric Steuer
Creative Director, Creative Commons
Email

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