Press Releases

Al Jazeera Announces Launch of Free Footage Under Creative Commons License

Eric Steuer, January 13th, 2009

Doha, Qatar – January 13, 2009

Al Jazeera Network today announced the world’s first repository of broadcast-quality video footage released under the Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution license. Select Al Jazeera video footage – at this time, footage of the War in Gaza – will be available for free to be downloaded, shared, remixed, subtitled and eventually rebroadcasted by users and TV stations across the world with acknowledgement to Al Jazeera.

Al Jazeera will release its exclusive Arabic and English coverage produced by the Network’s correspondents and crews in the Gaza Strip online at http://cc.aljazeera.net. The ongoing war and crisis in Gaza, together with the scarcity of news footage available, make the repository a key resource for anyone producing content about the current situation.

This is the first time that video footage produced by a news broadcaster is released under the Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution license, which allows for both commercial and non-commercial use.

Mohamed Nanabhay, who headed New Media at Al Jazeera and launched the project, stated: “As one of the only international broadcasters in Gaza, our coverage of the war has been unsurpassed. The launch of Al Jazeera’s Creative Commons Repository means that our Gaza footage will be made available under the most permissive Creative Commons license (CC-BY). With the flexibility of the license, we expect to introduce our outstanding coverage to an even wider audience across the world. This means that news outlets, filmmakers and bloggers will be able to easily share, remix, and reuse our footage.”

Lawrence Lessig – founder of the Creative Commons organization and Professor of Law at Stanford University – stated: “Al Jazeera is teaching an important lesson about how free speech gets built and supported. By providing a free resource for the world, the network is encouraging wider debate, and a richer understanding.”

Joichi Ito – CEO of Creative Commons and a world-renowned technology  entrepreneur – added: “Video news footage is an essential part of modern journalism. Providing material under a Creative Commons license to allow commercial and amateur use is an enormous contribution to the global dialogue around important events. Al Jazeera has set the example and the standard that we hope others will follow.”

As a pioneer in news and media, Al Jazeera is always looking for ways to make its unique content accessible to audiences across the world and the launch of Al Jazeera’s Creative Commons Repository is another concrete step in this direction.

For details on downloading and accessing content from Al Jazeera’s Creative Commons Repository please go to http://cc.aljazeera.net or contact creativecommons@aljazeera.net.

About Al Jazeera

Al Jazeera started out over twelve years ago as the first independent Arabic news channel in the world dedicated to providing comprehensive television news and live debate for the Arab world. In 2006, Al Jazeera was ranked by brandchannel.com as the most impactful television broadcast news brand globally.  As a result of its expansion and the creation of new channels and services, Al Jazeera was formally named the Al Jazeera Network in March 2006, transforming its operation into an international media corporation. The Al Jazeera Network now consists of the flagship Al Jazeera Arabic channel, Al Jazeera English, Al Jazeera Documentary, Al Jazeera Sport, Al Jazeera.net (the English and Arabic web sites), the Al Jazeera Media Training and Development Center, the Al Jazeera Center for Studies, Al Jazeera Mubasher (Live), and Al Jazeera Mobile.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, the Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. The Creative Commons licensing suite has been ported to 50 jurisdictions around the world. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Lauren McCollough
Media Relations, Al Jazeera Network
press.int@aljazeera.net
+974 489 6046

Eric Steuer
Creative Director, Creative Commons
eric@creativecommons.org

Donatella Della Ratta
Arab World Media and Development Manager, Creative Commons
donatella@creativecommons.org
++39 339 2248940
++963 949095651

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Creative Commons International and Wikimedia Germany in closer collaboration, shared office space

Michelle Thorne, December 9th, 2008

Berlin, Germany

Building on existing collaborations with local Wikimedia projects, Creative Commons International (CCi) will be moving its current office in Berlin-Mitte to Berlin-Schöneberg to share workspace with Wikimedia Germany. The move reflects the organizations’ growing efforts and long-standing mutual support.

Wikimedia Germany, the first independent national Wikimedia chapter, is known the world over for its high quality articles and exemplary member participation, leading the first international Wikimedia conference “Wikimania” in 2005 in Frankfurt am Main and establishing Wikipedia Academies in 2006.

“The free culture and free content communities in Germany are incredibly strong, and this collaboration will help build bridges across projects, people, and resources. It is my hope that these ties will extend to community members worldwide.” CCi Director Dr. Catharina Maracke remarks.

CCi works closely with other local Wikimedia chapters, including Wikimedia Serbia, one of the institutional hosts of the CC Serbia project, and Wikimedia Indonesia, which will shortly begin porting the CC licenses to Indonesian law. Nordic CC and Wikimedia communities are also strengthening ties, as demonstrated by the recent “free society” conference FSCONS, organized by CC Sweden, Wikimedia Sweden, and the Free Software Foundation Europe.

Beginning December 10, 2008, the CCi office will be based in Eisenacher Straße 2, 10777 Berlin, Germany.


About Wikimedia Germany

The organization Wikimedia Germany (Wikimedia Deutschland – Gesellschaft zur Förderung Freien Wissens e.V.) was founded in June 2004 by active contributors to the free encyclopedia, Wikipedia. Its mission is to foster Free Knowledge through information and education in general and through the support of diverse projects led by volunteers who are making knowledge freely available to everyone. Wikimedia Germany focuses its efforts on Wikipedia and related projects driven by the Wikimedia Foundation. For more information, please visit http://wikimedia.de/.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, the Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Dr. Catharina Maracke
Director
Creative Commons International

Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/presskit
http://creativecommons.org/international

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DotAsia and Creative Commons Join Forces to Foster Creativity and Sharing in Asia

Melissa Reeder, October 24th, 2008

The creativity of Asia’s people will be supported and shared thanks to a new long-term strategic collaboration between the DotAsia Organisation and Creative Commons (CC).

DotAsia, the not-for-profit registry operator for the “.Asia” Internet top-level domain, plans to commit US$100,000 to Creative Commons in support of its cause, outreach and community efforts in Asia. In addition, DotAsia will contribute time and effort into assisting in the coordination of events, activities of CC’s regional chapters and various other socio-technical initiatives, such as a next generation copyright registry project.

The collaboration will be announced by the CEO of Creative Commons, Mr. Joi Ito, and Mr. Edmon Chung, the CEO of DotAsia, during the launch ceremony next Saturday afternoon (Oct 25) for Creative Commons Hong Kong (CCHK) at the HKICC Lee Shau Kee School of Creativity, Kowloon, Hong Kong. For more details about the launch event visit CCHK’s
website.

“We are thrilled to work with Joi and the brilliant team at Creative Commons”, said Edmon Chung, “this strategic alliance matches the core mission of DotAsia to promote Internet development and adoption in Asia. It also helps strengthen our connection to the worldwide IPR community. Stay tuned here for CC activities in Asia.”

“The contribution from DotAsia is very meaningful to the development of Creative Commons in Asia. Through collaboration with DotAsia,” Joi Ito added. “CC can look forward to building stronger rapport with the creative and cultural communities in Greater China and Asia.”

About DotAsia

DotAsia Organisation is a not-for-profit corporation with a mission to promote Internet development and adoption in Asia. The organization oversees the ‘.Asia’ top-level Internet domain name, and is formed as an open consortium of 20 official top-level-domain authorities around the region, including .CN (China), .JP (Japan), .KR (Korea), .IN (India), .NZ (New Zealand), .PH (Philippines), etc., and 5 regional Internet organizations including APNIC, APNG, APCERT, PAN and APTLD. In the past two decades Asia has developed into a global force in the commercial, political and cultural network. The .Asia domain aspires to embrace this dynamism in the Asia Century to become a nucleus, intersection and breeding ground for Internet activity and development in the region.

About Creative Commons Hong Kong

Creative Commons Hong Kong (CCHK) is hosted by the Journalism and Media Studies Centre at the University of Hong Kong. CCHK works with Creative Commons to localize and promote the use of Creative Commons licenses in Hong Kong.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public.

Contact – Melissa Reeder, Development Manager, melissa@creativecommons.org

Press Kit

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Hong Kong Promotes Education, Creativity with Creative Commons’ 50th Launch Event

Michelle Thorne, October 23rd, 2008

[Text in English and Chinese]

Hong Kong and Berlin, Germany

The localized Hong Kong licenses, launching October 25, will enable Hong Kong creators to clearly and legally indicate the freedoms they wish their creative works to carry. The launch marks the fiftieth Creative Commons jurisdiction to celebrate the license porting.

When Creative Commons was founded in 2001, the core Creative Commons licenses were drafted according to United States Copyright Law. Following this initiative, global interest in the “some rights reserved” approach to copyright led to the development of national versions of the Creative Commons licenses. To achieve this aim, Creative Commons International (CCi) works in collaboration with a network of legal experts and professionals to build a free, multilingual licensing system that is legally enforceable in jurisdictions around the world. Through a standard license porting process, CCi and CC Project Leads have since ported the licensing suite to fifty jurisdictions. As of July 2008, there are an estimated 130 million CC-licensed works worldwide, and global license usage continues to grow.

On October 25, the Hong Kong launch will be held during an event co-sponsored by the University of Hong Kong’s Journalism and Media Studies Centre and the Lee Shau Kee School of Creativity. Creative Commons founder Prof. Lawrence Lessig and CC CEO Joichi Ito will open the ceremony. Their keynotes will be followed by an open courseware presentation and a panel discussion about how Hong Kong can improve education and promote creativity through Creative Commons. The launch ceremony will be preceded by a performance by the Hong Kong band Snoblind, who have issued a number of their works under a Creative Commons license. After the launch, parallel sessions will showcase workshops and performances from different creative sectors, including the reading of a play, a bloggers’ workshop, a music workshop and two documentary workshops. For more information about the launch please visit http://hk.creativecommons.org.

Legal Leads of CCHK, Dr. Yahong Li and Ms. Alice Lee of the University of Hong Kong’s Faculty of Law, conducted the porting process and public discussion of the licenses with local and international legal experts and in collaboration with CCi. The CCHK project is hosted by the Journalism and Media Studies Centre at the University of Hong Kong, with Rebecca MacKinnon serving as Public Lead. The work of CCHK is also supported by a Preparatory Executive Committee chaired by Internet entrepreneur Mr. Pindar Wong and comprised of members from different sectors in Hong Kong such as the IT sector, education, media, the arts, and politics. The CCHK launch would not be possible without the work of many enthusiastic community volunteers.

“At a time when Hong Kong is working to improve education and strengthen our creative industries, I see CCHK helping to provide a firm foundation on which to build Hong Kong’s creative capital,” says Pindar Wong, Chairman of CCHK’s Preparatory Executive Committee. “For example, in education, where e-books can be developed and shared over the net using our licenses.”


About the Journalism and Media Studies Centre

Founded in 1999, the Journalism and Media Studies Centre (JMSC) is a teaching and research unit at The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong’s oldest university. The JMSC offers an undergraduate and graduate degree, and professional programs for working journalists and executives. The JMSC is committed to the pursuit of excellence in journalism and supporting Asian voices in the international media. JMSC’s activities, such as the Media Law Project and the China Media Project, strive to promote civil society and an informed citizenry through a vibrant and professional news media. The JMSC works in partnership with Hong Kong University faculties and departments and a vast network of professional groups in Hong Kong, China and beyond.

The JMSC assumed the role of host organization for Creative Commons Hong Kong in August 2007. The project’s Public Lead is Rebecca MacKinnon, Assistant Professor at the JMSC, while the role of Legal Lead is shared by Dr. Yahong Li and Alice Lee of The University of Hong Kong Faculty of Law. Further updates about CC Hong Kong’s activities can be found at Creative Commons Hong Kong website: http://hk.creativecommons.org. For more information about JMSC, visit http://jmsc.hku.hk/.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, the Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Dr. Catharina Maracke
Director, Creative Commons International
catharina [at] creativecommons [dot] org

Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/presskit

http://creativecommons.org/international/hk
http://hk.creativecommons.org

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香港採用〈共享創意〉推動教育與創意
全球第五十個〈共享創意〉本地化組織誕生


2008年10月23日:中國香港和德國柏林

〈香港共享創意〉是〈共享創意〉組織第五十名成員,剛完成把「保留部份版權」條款因應本地法律的修訂,方便香港創作人在發佈作品時,以合法方式清晰標示如何保留部份版權。

〈共享創意〉在2001年成立時,核心條款是依據美國版權法草擬。此後,全球各地對「保留部份版權」制度積極回應,發展出各地本地化之〈共享創意〉條款。〈國際共享創意〉組織與法律界人士攜手建立一套靈活採用、多語言版本的條款系統,適用於各個國家地區。〈國際共享創意〉和各國各地的領導小組,依據劃一程序,因應當地法律修訂核心條款。迄今已有五十個司法管轄區完成修訂程序。至2008年7月,估計已有1億3千萬項作品在全球各地以〈共享創意〉條款發表。該數目仍在持續增加。

〈香港共享創意〉在10月25日舉行成立典禮,邀請〈共享創意〉創辦人Lawrence Lessig教授和總幹事伊藤穰一蒞臨主禮。當日的活動有開放式課程的簡報和嘉賓座談會,討論香港可如何利用〈共享創意〉改善教育資源和推動創意。其他文娛表演活動還有已經以〈共享創意〉條款發表唱片集的Snoblind二人組現場演奏、朗讀使用〈共享創意〉條款的新劇本、博客工作坊、作曲家講座、以及兩場錄像記錄片工作坊。是日成立典禮由香港大學新聞及傳媒研究中心和香港兆基創意書院聯合贊助。〈香港共享創意〉網址http://hk.creativecommons.org.

香港大學法律系李亞虹副教授及李雪菁副教授連同本地和國際法律專家,與〈國際共享創意〉合作,主持〈香港共享創意〉的法律修訂和公眾咨詢工作。〈香港共享創意〉是香港大學新聞及傳媒研究中心主持的項目,由麥康瑞助理教授出任項目主持人。〈香港共享創意〉籌備委員會由黃平達先生出任主席,得到來自資訊科技、教育、媒體、藝術和政界多個界別的人士以及眾多義工的全力支持。

籌備委員會主席黃平達先生說:「〈香港共享創意〉為香港的創意資本建立穩固的基礎。例如教育界可以創作電子書本,利用〈香港共享創意〉條款在互聯網發表」

香港大學新聞及傳媒研究中心
香港大學在1999年成立新聞及傳媒研究中心,兼備教學和研究專長。除了學士和研究生課程外,中心亦為現職記者和媒體人士提供專業課程。該中心致力提升新聞及傳媒的專業水平及支持亞洲傳媒在國際媒體中發揮更大影響。中心的其他活動,例如媒體法律項目、中國傳媒項目等,旨在通過有活力的專業傳媒推廣公民社會和公民的知情權。中心一直與香港大學各院系、以及香港、中國內地和其他地區的專業團體網絡緊密合作。

新聞及傳媒研究中心在2007年8月啟動〈香港共享創意〉項目,由麥康瑞助理教授主持;法律系李亞虹副教授及李雪菁副教授共同主持法律修訂工作。
〈新聞及傳媒研究中心〉網址http://jmsc.hku.hk/

〈共享創意〉
〈共享創意〉在2001年成立,是一個非營利組織,旨在推廣在公共領域或受版權保護的知識和藝術作品得以創意再用。〈共享創意〉以傳統的「保留全部版權」制度為基礎,倡議一套靈活的「保留部份版權」條款,讓作家、藝術家、科學家和教育家可以自選的方式和條件發表作品。〈共享創意〉組織得到多個美國公共領域團體和基金會以及公眾人士慷慨支持。
〈共享創意〉網址http://creativecommons.org

聯絡人:〈國際共享創意〉總裁Catharina Maracke博士
catharina [at] creativecommons [dot] org

新聞資料
http://creativecommons.org/presskit
http://creativecommons.org/international/hk
http://hk.creativecommons.org

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CC Guatemala: “Free to Choose, To Create, To Innovate, To Learn, To Imagine”

Michelle Thorne, October 22nd, 2008

[Text in English and Spanish]

Guatemala City, Guatemala and Berlin, Germany

On October 23 in Guatemala City, the University Francisco Marroquin will host an event to celebrate the localized Creative Commons licenses in Guatemala. Jimmy Wales, Creative Commons Board member, will hold the keynote address “Free to choose, to create, to innovate, to learn, to imagine” at a ceremony in the Auditorium Juan Bautista Gutierrez.

The Creative Commons Guatemala team is lead by Renata Avila, who coordinated the porting process and public consultation with local and international legal experts. At the launch, CC Guatemala’s institutional host, the University Francisco Marroquin and its New Media Center, will release a vast amount of material and education resources under the Guatemalan licenses. The Lienzo de Quauhquechollan: A Chronicle of Conquest will be available under a localized CC license as well. Plaza de la Libertad will host an exhibition Xelajú Lights at the launch venue.

Furthermore, the region’s first orphan works rescue program will be initiated by the Ludwig von Mises Library of the University Francisco Marroquín. The program will scan twentieth-century Central American works in cooperation with the Internet Archive.

The porting of the Guatemalan licenses is an important stride towards strengthening and building the global commons. The launch precedes the Latam Commons 2008 conference in Santiago, Chile, on November 19-21. The conference, focusing on the public domain and “open licensing, open technologies, and the future of education in Latin America” will be hosted by ccLearn and Derechos Digitales, and attended by CC Project Leads, ccLearn staff, and interested stakeholders from Latin America.

About University Francisco Marroquin and the New Media Centre

The University Francisco Marroquín`s mission is to teach and disseminate ethical, legal, and economic principles of a society for free and responsible persons. With the CC licenses, it will help creators and users liberate their creativity and share their knowledge and imagination without the burden of unnecessary legal obstacles.

Its New Media department, founded in 2001, was created to assist faculty members, researchers, and students in the use, creation, and management of digital resources that complement their academic work. It actively assist departments and professors who wish to incorporate digital media into their courses by teaching various short courses in video and multimedia production. These developments permit greater faculty and student participation in the creation and use of teaching resources and mean that digital video is becoming an important tool in the provision of course material at UFM. For more information, please visit http://newmedia.ufm.edu/.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, the Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Dr. Catharina Maracke
Director
Creative Commons International, Creative Commons
catharina -at- creativecommons -dot- org

Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/presskit
http://creativecommons.org/international/gt

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CREATIVE COMMONS EN GUATEMALA: “LIBERTAD DE ELEGIR, CREAR, INNOVAR, APRENDER, IMAGINAR”

Guatemala, Guatemala y Berlín, Alemania

EL 23 de Octubre en la ciudad de Guatemala, la Universidad Francisco Marroquín será el anfitrión del lanzamiento de las licencias de Creative Commons en Guatemala. Jimmy Wales, miembro de la mesa directiva de Creative Commons, dará el discurso de apertura del la conferencia bajo el tema “Libertad de Elegir, Crear, Innovar, Aprender, Imaginar” en el Auditorio Juan Bautista Gutiérrez.

El equipo de Creative Commons Guatemala es dirigido por Renata Ávila, quien coordinó el proceso de adaptación y discusión pública con las entidades locales y expertos en derecho internacional. En el evento del lanzamiento de las licencias, la institución anfitriona de CC Guatemala, la Universidad Francisco Marroquín y el departamento New Media, dará a conocer una gran cantidad de material y recursos educativos bajo las licencias de Guatemala. El Lienzo de Quauhquechollan: Crónica de la conquista estará disponible también bajo una licencia de CC. La Plaza de la Libertad será la sede de la exposición de Luces de Xelajú en el evento del lanzamiento.

Además, el primer programa de rescate de obras huérfanas de la región será iniciado por la Biblioteca de la Universidad Francisco Marroquín, Ludwig von Mises. El programa digitalizará trabajos del siglo XX de América Latina en cooperación con el archivo de Internet .

El proceso de adaptación de las licencias Guatemaltecas es un importante paso hacia el fortalecimiento y fomento de “Global Commons.” Del 19 al 21 de Noviembre, después del evento del lanzamiento, se llevará a cabo la conferencia de Latam Commons 2008 en Santiago de Chile. La conferencia enfocada en el dominio público y “open licensing, open technologies, y el futuro de la educación en América Latina” será organizada por CCLearn y Derechos Digitales, a la que asistirán líderes del proyecto de CC en Latino América, miembros de CCLearn y otros representantes de América Latina.

Acerca de la Universidad Francisco Marroquín y el departamento New Media

A misión de la Universidad Francisco Marroquín es la enseñanza y difusión de los principios éticos, jurídicos y económicos de una sociedad de personas libres y responsables.

El departamento New Media, fundado en el 2001, fue creado con el objeto de apoyar a los miembros de las facultades, investigadores y estudiantes en el uso, creación y manejo de los recursos digitales que complementan y sirven para documentar su trabajo académico. Asiste activamente a los departamentos y profesores que deseen incorporar medios digitales en sus cursos mediante la enseñanza de diversos cursos de corta duración en vídeo y producción de multimedia. Estos recursos permiten una mayor participación a los catedráticos y estudiantes en la creación y uso de otros recursos relacionados con la enseñanza, y el video digital se está convirtiendo en una herramienta importante en la provisión de material docente en la UFM. http://newmedia.ufm.edu/

Sobre Creative Commons

Creative Commons es una organización sin ánimo de lucro. Fundada en 2001, promueve la reutilización creativa de obras intelectuales y artísticas, ya sean propias o de dominio público. A través de sus licencias exentas de costo, Creative Commons ofrece a autores, artistas, científicos, y educadores una flexible variedad de protecciones y libertades bajo el concepto tradicional de “Todos los derechos reservados” para permitir voluntariamente “Algunos derechos reservados”. Creative Commons nace y recibe un generoso apoyo de organizaciones, entre ellas el Centro para el Dominio Público, el Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, y The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, además del público general. Para obtener más información sobre Creative Commons, puede visitar http://creativecommons.org.

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Jesse Dylan’s “A Shared Culture” Video Released to Celebrate Creative Commons 2008 Fundraising Campaign

Eric Steuer, October 15th, 2008

Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization focused on building a body of openly shareable and reusable creative work, today announced the launch of its 2008 fundraising campaign. Information about how to support Creative Commons is available at http://support.creativecommons.org/.

To celebrate the campaign, Creative Commons today released “A Shared Culture,” a short video by renowned filmmaker Jesse Dylan. Known for helming a variety of films, music videos, and the Emmy Award-winning “Yes We Can” Barack Obama campaign video collaboration with rapper will.i.am, Dylan created “A Shared Culture” to help spread the word about the Creative Commons mission. The video is available online to watch and download at http://creativecommons.org/asharedculture.

In the video, some of the leading thinkers behind Creative Commons describe how the organization is helping “save the world from failed sharing” through free tools that enable creators to easily make their work available to the public for legal sharing and remix. Dylan puts the Creative Commons system into action by punctuating the interview footage with dozens of photos that have been offered to the public for use under CC licenses. Similarly, he used two CC-licensed instrumental pieces by Nine Inch Nails as the video’s soundtrack music. These tracks, “17 Ghosts II” and “21 Ghosts III,” come from the Nine Inch Nails album Ghosts I-IV, which was released earlier this year under a Creative Commons BY-NC-SA license.

“I wanted to give people a clear understanding of how Creative Commons works and why it’s an important system,” says Dylan. “I think the best way to do that is by actually putting to use some of the great stuff that’s been made available to the world under CC licenses. The images and music in the video were made by people all around the world who chose to publish their work in a way that says ‘Hey, see this thing I made? You can take it and use it to make something else. I’m giving you the legal right to use it, because I don’t think that copyright should be something that stands in the way of creativity.’ Without the amazing work of Nine Inch Nails and all of the photographers whose images I used, this kind of video simply wouldn’t have been possible to make.”

“A Shared Culture” is released under a Creative Commons BY-NC-SA license, meaning that anyone in the world can legally share, use, and remix it, as long as they abide by the license’s conditions. (The terms of the BY-NC-SA license are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). On its website and via LegalTorrents, Creative Commons has offered the video in several formats (ranging from Quicktime to Ogg Theora) and has provided photographer attribution through ImageStamper.

As part of the fundraising campaign, Creative Commons is calling on members of the public to use “A Shared Culture” as the basis for other videos that describe how CC licenses have enabled legal access, collaboration, and participation around the world.

“We hope that Jesse Dylan’s amazing video is just the first in a vast collection of videos and projects that address the idea of ‘A Shared Culture,’” says Joi Ito, Creative Commons’ CEO. “Take what Jesse has done and use it to make your own video. There are millions of CC-licensed songs, images, and video clips out there that you can use. Shoot some of your own interview footage that features your friends and people in your local communities talking about these issues. Take everything that you have at hand and use it to create, customize, remix, and share. Show the world that copyright should be a tool for fostering innovation, and not a barrier to creative progress.”

“We’re thrilled that Jesse made this amazing video to show the strength and importance of Creative Commons,” says Melissa Reeder, Creative Commons’ development manager. “We hope it inspires the public to create their own work, to use CC-licenses, and support Creative Commons financially during our fundraising drive and beyond.”

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Eric Steuer
Creative Director, Creative Commons
eric at creativecommons dot org

Melissa Reeder
Development Manager, Creative Commons
melissa at creativecommons dot org

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Creative Commons Launches “CC Network” with Annual Campaign

Melissa Reeder, October 15th, 2008

Today Creative Commons launched the Creative Commons Network, as part of their annual fundraising campaign.

The CC Network offers users a profile and web badge, providing a means to express support of Creative Commons. The site also acts as a testbed for digital copyright registry technology. CC Network users may list their Creative Commons licensed works on their CC Network profile. The profile and web badge include metadata corresponding to the license used, allowing applications to consume information about the provenance of licensed works and licensors. Creative Commons’ own website is one such application and now displays provenance information on license web pages if available.

Creative Commons CTO Nathan Yergler said “The CC Network is where the semantic rubber meets the web road”, referring to the high expectations and underwhelming adoption of Semantic Web technologies. Yergler continued “With the CC Network we’re leveraging everything we’ve learned over the past five years about metadata on the web, including the new RDFa standard, along with the work of many other groups, including FOAF, POWDER, and SIOC.”

CC Network accounts also come with an OpenID login, allowing users to login to sites that support OpenID via a trusted provider. The CC Network aims to raise the bar for OpenID providers by taking all steps necessary to protect users’ privacy. “An OpenID provider knows every site a user logs into via OpenID, so it is important for a user to be able to trust their OpenID provider. We hope users think Creative Commons is trustworthy, but we’re also taking steps to bake user protections into the CC Network’s OpenID provider implementation, from the technology to terms of service to explanation of the risks and benefits to users” said security expert Ben Adida, a technology advisor to Creative Commons.

All of the standards the CC Network builds on are open, and the code that runs the site is free software. “The CC Network launch is a step toward a system of interoperable digital copyright registries as open as the web itself. Open registries allow users to discover more information about who’s licensing content, and as such are a necessary complement to our open copyright licenses” explained Creative Commons CEO Joi Ito.

CC Network accounts are offered as a benefit for annual CC supporters at a level of $50 or above ($25 for students). Creative Commons’ annual fundraising campaign, themed “Build the Commons”, has a goal of raising $500,000 as well as encouraging CC supporters to lead by example, educate others about the value of the CC approach to openness and access, and to help launch the CC Network.

Please visit the Build the Commons campaign webpage, for more information.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, please visit the Creative Commons’ website.

Contact

Melissa Reeder, Development Manager, Creative Commons,
melissa@creativecommons.org

Press Kit

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Creative Commons Launches Study of “Noncommercial Use”

Eric Steuer, September 18th, 2008

San Francisco, California, USA — September 18, 2008

The nonprofit organization Creative Commons has launched a research study that will explore differences between commercial and noncommercial uses of content, as those uses are understood among various communities and in connection with a wide variety of content. Generous support for the study has been provided by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Creative Commons provides free copyright licenses to creators who want to give the public certain permissions to use their works, in advance and without the need for one-to-one contact between the user and the creator. “Noncommercial” or “NC” is one of four different license terms that creators may choose to apply to their Creative Commons-licensed content. Works distributed under a Creative Commons license including the NC term may be used by anyone for any purpose that is not “primarily intended for or directed toward commercial advantage or private monetary compensation,” provided the use also complies with the other terms of the license. Works distributed under a Creative Commons license without the NC term may additionally be used for commercial purposes, an option that promotes creative reuse in a broader range of contexts.

“The study has direct relevance to Creative Commons’ mission of providing free, flexible copyright licenses that are easy to understand and simple to use,” said Creative Commons CEO Joi Ito. “The NC term is a popular option for creators choosing a Creative Commons license, and that tells us the term meets a need. However, as exponentially increasing numbers of works are made available under CC licenses, we want to provide additional information for creators about the contexts in which the NC term may further or impede their intentions with respect to the works they choose to share, and we want to make sure that users clearly understand those intentions. We expect the study findings will help us do a better job of explaining the licenses and to improve them, where possible. We also hope the findings, which will be made publicly available, will contribute to better understanding of some of the complexities of digital distribution of content.”

“Developments in technology, social practices, and business models are pressing the question of what should count as a commercial use,” explained Creative Commons Special Counsel Virginia Rutledge, who is leading the study. “The answer to that question should come from creators, who should be able to specify what uses they want to permit, subject to the limitations and exceptions to copyright or other applicable law. Creative Commons is fortunate to have a stellar group of legal, public policy, and information technology experts advising on this project, as well as the help of its extensive international network of affiliates.”

Research is expected to be completed early in 2009. The study will investigate understanding of noncommercial use and the Creative Commons NC license term through a random sample survey of online content creators in the U.S., a poll of the global Creative Commons community, and qualitative data gathered from interviews with thought leaders and focus groups with participants from around the world who create and use a wide variety of content and media.

Advisors on the project include distinguished academicians Christine L. Borgman, Ph.D., Professor and Presidential Chair in Information Studies, Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles; William H. Dutton, Ph.D., Director of the Oxford Internet Institute, Professor of Internet Studies, University of Oxford, Fellow of Balliol College; Deborah R. Hensler, Ph.D., Judge John W. Ford Professor of Dispute Resolution and Associate Dean, Graduate Studies, Stanford Law School; and Daniel E. Ho, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Law and Robert E. Paradise Faculty Fellow for Excellence in Teaching and Research, Stanford Law School.

Research will be conducted by market research firm Netpop Research, LLC. “The potential impact of this study is profound, given the number of creators turning to the Web to distribute and share their works,” said Josh Crandall, managing director of Netpop Research. “We are excited to be a part of it.”

Since Creative Commons licenses were introduced in 2002, they have been translated into 47 legal jurisdictions and adopted by content creators around the globe, from remix musicians to educator consortia, bloggers to book publishers. At present over 130 million works are available on the Internet under Creative Commons licenses, each work tagged with metadata expressing the rights and permissions associated with it. This wealth of pre-cleared material is locatable through functionality built into major search engines Google and Yahoo!, as well as through the Creative Commons website and many online content providers and services.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

About Netpop Research, LLC

Netpop Research, LLC is a San Francisco-based strategic market research firm that specializes in online media, digital entertainment and user-generated content trends. Netpop Research has fielded numerous studies for major profit and nonprofit entities, and is the creator of the Netpop tracking study of Internet usage among broadband consumers in the United States and China.

Contact

Virginia Rutledge
Special Counsel, Creative Commons
virginia at creativecommons dot org

Press Kit

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CC Romania Promotes Creativity with Localized Licenses

Michelle Thorne, September 1st, 2008

Text in English and Romanian

Bucharest, Romania and Berlin, Germany — September 2, 2008

Creators in Romania now have the option to license their creative works under one of the six Creative Commons licenses tailored to Romanian law. Available as of today, the ported Romanian licensing suite (BY through to BY-NC-ND of Version 3.0) is provided free of charge to rights holders wishing to signal that for a particular work, they have chosen a “some rights reserved” approach to copyright.

The Creative Commons team in Romania, led by Bogdan Manolea and Stefan Gavrilescu and supported by the Association for Technology and Internet, carried out the porting process and public discussion with local and international legal experts and in consultation with Creative Commons International.

The licenses will be launched in Bucharest on September 2 at 1600 during an event hosted by the Center for Independent Journalism. The event will be opened by Bogdan Manolea with a presentation about the philosophy of Creative Commons and an introduction to the Romanian licenses. A panel thereafter will outline practical uses of the CC licenses in Romania, with contributions from Razvan Rusu from Travka, the first Romanian band to license their entire album under a CC license; Ioana Avadani from the Center for Independent Journalism; and Florin Grozea from the popular Romanian band Hi-Q. Other Creative Commons users in Romania are invited to join the launch and participate in the conversation.

At the event, Hi-Q will launch a new contest offering a preview of their next single. The vocal tracks of the band’s three singers will be released under the Romanian CC BY-SA 3.0 license, and fans will be invited to create remixes of the tracks and upload them to http://eok.ro or other music-sharing websites.

Remarking on the completion of the porting process, CC Romania Project Lead Bogdan Manolea says, “With the launch of the localized Creative Commons licenses, more Romanian artists and users will learn about open licenses and its benefits. We hope to have more projects that will involve innovation in intellectual property and will promote open content concepts in Romania. We would like to thank everyone that has been involved in this process, including our partners for the launch of the Creative Commons licenses in Romania – Hi-Q band and the Center for Independent Journalism.”

The Romanian licenses are the 26th ported Creative Commons suite in Europe and the 47th worldwide. The licenses are available through the Creative Commons License Chooser at http://creativecommons.org/license/?lang=ro.

About the Association for Technology and Internet

APTI is an independent Romanian NGO that has the objective of promoting the fair use of information society services in balance with current legal norms. The organization aims to further human rights in the digital environment and support the digital civil rights in the Romanian society. For more information about APTI, visit http://www.apti.ro/.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, the Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Dr. Catharina Maracke
Director
Creative Commons International, Creative Commons

Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/presskit
http://creativecommons.org/international/ro

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CC ROMÂNIA PROMOVEAZĂ CREATIVITATEA PRIN LICENŢELE LOCALIZATE

Bucureşti, Romania şi Berlin, Germania — 2 Septembrie 2008

Creatorii români au acum posibilitatea de a-şi licenţia operele printr-una din cele şase licenţe Creative Commons adaptate la legea română. De astăzi, întreaga serie de licenţe adaptate (versiunea 3.0 de la Atribuire (BY) până la Atribuire-Necomercial-Fără Modificări (BY-NC-ND)) este disponibilă în mod gratuit pentru titularii de drepturi de autor care doresc să licenţieze opera lor doar cu “unele drepturi rezervate”.

Echipa Creative Commons din România, condusă de Bogdan Manolea şi Ştefan Gavrilescu şi susţinută de Asociaţia pentru Tehnologie si Internet – APTI, a parcurs procesul de adaptare al licenţelor şi discuţie publică cu experţi juridici naţionali şi internaţionali şi în consultare cu Creative Commons International.

Licenţele vor fi lansate pe data de 2 Septembrie 2008 în Bucureşti, la un eveniment găzduit de Centrul pentru Jurnalism Independent. Bogdan Manolea va deschide evenimentul cu o prezentare despre filozofia Creative Commons şi va introduce licenţele româneşti. Alţi participanţi vor contribui la discuţia privind utilizările practice ale licenţelor Creative Commons în România, printre care Răzvan Rusu (ex-Travka, prima formaţie românească care a licenţiat un întreg album sub o licenţă Creative Commons), Ioana Avădani (Centrul pentru Jurnalism Independent) sau Florin Grozea (HI-Q). Alţi utilizatori români de Creative Commons din România au fost invitaţi să participe la lansare şi la discuţia publică.

Cu ocazia acestui eveniment formaţia HI-Q va lansa un nou concurs oferind un preview al următorului lor single. Vocile celor 3 membri ai formaţiei vor fi oferite sub licenţa Creative Commons Atribuire–Distribuire în Condiţii Identice (BY-SA) 3.0 România şi astfel toata lumea va fi invitată să creeze remixuri pe aceste voci şi să pună rezultatele pe site-ul http://eok.ro sau alte site-uri de video-sharing de pe Internet.

Bogdan Manolea, Project Lead pentru Creative Commons Romania, a declarat pentru acest eveniment: “O dată cu lansare licenţelor Creative Commons în limba română, mai mulţi artişti si simpli utilizatori din România au posibilitatea să înveţe despre licenţele deschise şi avantajele lor. Sperăm să avem din ce în ce mai multe proiecte care vor susţine inovaţia în proprietatea intelectuală şi vor promova conceptele de conţinut deschis în România. Nu putem să nu mulţumim partenerilor lansării – Trupei HI-Q şi Centrului pentru Jurnalism Independent, ca şi tuturor celor care ne-au ajutat pe parcursul procesului de adaptare a licenţelor”

Licenţele în limba română sunt al 26-lea proiect Creative Commons adaptat în Europa şi al 47-lea în întreaga lume. Licenţele sunt disponibile prin aplicaţia disponibilă pe site-ul Creative Commons la http://creativecommons.org/license/?lang=ro.

Jurnaliştii interesaţi să participe la lansare sunt invitaţi pe data de 2 Septembrie 2008,  la ora 16 00 la sediul Centrului pentru Jurnalism Independent – B-dul Regina Elisabeta nr. 32, et. 1 (Cladirea Federatiei Sindicatelor Libere din Invatamant aflata intre Piata Kogalniceanu si Bd Schitu Magureanu), Sector 5, Bucuresti. Agenda evenimentului este ataşată la acest comunicat.

Licenţele Creative Commons permit autorilor schimbarea termenilor de licenţiere de la clasicul “Toate drepturile rezervate” la “Unele drepturi rezervate”. Licenţele Creative Commons nu sunt o alternativă la dreptul de autor, ci se aplică pe baza legislaţiei privind dreptul de autor, astfel încât să poţi modifica termenii de licenţiere pentru a permite o  licenţiere deschisă a operelor tale.

Asociaţia pentru Tehnologie şi Internet (APTI) este o organizaţie româneasca non-guvernamentală şi independentă care are drept obiectiv promovarea utilizării leale a serviciilor societăţii informaţionale în concordanţă cu normele legale în vigoare. Organizaţia susţine drepturile omului in mediul digital şi promovează drepturile civile digitale. Pentru mai multe informatii vizitati despre APTI vizitaţi http://www.apti.ro/

Creative Commons este o organizaţie non-profit, înfiinţată în 2001, care promovează re-utilizarea creativă a operelor intelectuale şi artistice, indiferent daca sunt proprietare sau în domeniul public. Prin sistemul său de licenţe gratuite privind dreptul de autor Creative Commons oferă autorilor, artistilor, oamenilor de ştiinţă şi profesorilor posibilitatea alegerii unui spectru flexibil de libertăţi şi drepturi care permit schimbarea sistemului tradiţional de “Toate drepturile rezervate” într-un sistem voluntar de “Unele drepturi rezervate”. Creative Commons a fost lansat şi este susţinut prin efortul generos al mai multpr organizaţii, incluzând Centrul pentru Domeniul Public, Omidyar Network, Fundaţia Rockefeller, Fundaţia John D. şi  Catherine T. MacArthur , şi Fundaţia William şi Flora Hewlett, ca şi alte persoane publice. Pentru ai multe informaţii despre Creative Commons, vizitează http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Dr. Catharina Maracke
Director
Creative Commons International, Creative Commons

Bogdan Manolea
Director Executiv APTI
Creative Commons Romania Legal Lead

Press Kit
http://creativecommons.org/presskit
http://creativecommons.org/international/ro

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dublab & Creative Commons Launch “Into Infinity”

Eric Steuer, August 26th, 2008

Ready-to-Remix Art and Music Exhibit Online Now; Physical Installations to Follow

San Francisco, CA, USA and Los Angeles, CA, USA — August 26, 2008

Today, dublab and Creative Commons announced the launch of Into Infinity, an art and music exhibit jointly produced by the two nonprofit organizations. The online version of the exhibit is online now at http://intoinfinity.org; physical installations are being planned for Winter 2008 and throughout 2009.

Into Infinity comprises a collection of ready-to-remix 12-inch circular artworks and 8-second music loops created by a vast array of artists from around the world. Contributors include world-renowned graffiti artist Kofie, 2008 Whitney Biennial alumni Lucky Dragons, Anticon collective member Odd Nosdam, and electronic musicians Flying Lotus and DNTEL (AKA Jimmy Tamborello of The Postal Service). New submissions will be added to the exhibit regularly.

All of Into Infinity’s works are available for download under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial copyright license. This license gives the public the legal right to share, remix, and reuse all of the pieces of Into Infinity for noncommercial purposes. For the full terms of this Creative Commons license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/.

Into Infinity’s producers invite people to download the exhibit’s works and use them as source material for their own creations.

“Into Infinity is all about embracing the infinite possibilities of art and music,” says Mark McNeill, dublab’s founder. “These works are available to everyone in the world to reshape, remix, and redesign as many times over as possible. We can’t wait to see all of the creative ways people use them.”

“Sampling, remixing, and repurposing other people’s work has resulted in some of the greatest art of our times,” says Eric Steuer, Creative Commons’ creative director. “With this project, we want to make the statement that this sort of creativity should not only be legal, but also explicitly encouraged.”

Into Infinity’s producers add that new works made from assets offered online will be eligible for submission to the exhibit.

“As the show regenerates and expands, we’ll incorporate the best remixes into the show for display online and in our real-world exhibitions,” says McNeill.

About dublab

dublab is a nonprofit creative collective devoted to the growth of positive music, arts, and culture. At the core of the organization’s operations is a web radio station that broadcasts several streams of dublab’s signature “future roots” music. dublab has been broadcasting online since 1999 and now reaches more than 300,000 international listeners monthly. dublab’s creative actions include art exhibits, film projects, event production, and record releases.  Into Infinity follows along the vibrant conceptual curve of dublab’s previous art projects: Up Our Sleeve, The Dream Scene, and Patchwork. Information about all of these projects is available at http://dublab.com/artaction.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Eric Steuer
Creative Director, Creative Commons
eric at creativecommons dot org

Mark McNeill
Founder, dublab
frosty at dublab dot com

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