Press Releases

Flickr Cofounder Caterina Fake Joins Creative Commons Board

Eric Steuer, August 25th, 2008

San Francisco, CA, USA – August 25, 2008

Creative Commons announced today that Flickr cofounder Caterina Fake has joined its board of directors.

Fake cofounded the massively popular photo sharing site and community in early 2004. Flickr was one of the first media-sharing sites to embrace Creative Commons licensing as a way to encourage users to make their work available to the public for free and legal use. Since the site’s inception, Flickr’s community of photographers have licensed over 75 million photos to the public under Creative Commons copyright licenses, making it one of the biggest sources of permissively-licensed material on the Internet. CC-licensed Flickr photos are now used in a variety of projects and publications, ranging from Wikipedia to The New York Times.

After Flickr was acquired by Yahoo in 2005, Fake helped develop Yahoo’s social search products, ran its Technology Development Group, and founded Brickhouse, a rapid development environment for new products. She left Yahoo in June 2008 and subsequently took on the role of Chief Product Officer for startup Hunch. Fake is also a writer and artist, and was Salon.com’s art director prior to founding Flickr.

“Creativity flourishes when ideas are freed from legal impediments, when people are able to create and give,” Fake said. “In both my personal and professional work, I’ve seen Creative Commons remove obstacles, allowing the best of culture and ideas to be freely shared. I hope to be able to contribute to Creative Commons’ already significant success.”

“We’re thrilled that Caterina is joining the CC board,” said Joi Ito, Creative Commons’ CEO. “Her vast experience in business and social media make her a perfect addition to our team. We’re all honored and excited to be able to take advantage of her expertise and abilities to advance Creative Commons’ mission of increasing access and reducing barriers to collaboration.”

Fake has won many awards, including BusinessWeek‘s Best Leaders of 2005, Forbes‘ 2005 E-Gang, Fast Company‘s Fast 50, and Red Herring‘s 20 Entrepreneurs Under 35. She was named to the Time 100, Time‘s list of the world’s 100 most influential people. She sits on the boards of Etsy and Hunch, and advises a variety of startup companies.

Fake joins a board of directors that includes cyberlaw and intellectual property experts James Boyle, Michael Carroll, Lawrence Lessig, Eric Saltzman, and Molly Shaffer Van Houweling, as well as Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales, education innovator Esther Wojcicki, filmmaker Davis Guggenheim, Public Knowledge founder Laurie Racine, and MIT computer science professor Hal Abelson.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit creativecommons.org.

Contact

Eric Steuer
Creative Director, Creative Commons
eric at creativecommons.org

Press Kit

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THE “IP” Court Supports Enforceability of CC Licenses

Brian Rowe, August 13th, 2008

San Francisco, CA, USA — August 13, 2008

The United States Court of Appeals held, in Jacobsen v. Katzer, that “Open Source” or public license licensors are entitled to copyright infringement relief.

The Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC), the leading intellectual property court in the United States, has upheld a free copyright license, while explicitly pointing to the work of Creative Commons and others. The Court held that free licenses such as the CC licenses set conditions (rather than covenants) on the use of copyrighted work.  As a result, licensors using public licenses are able to seek injunctive relief for alleged copyright infringement, rather than being limited to traditional contract remedies.

Creative Commons founder Lawrence Lessig explained the theory of all free software, open source, and Creative Commons licenses upheld by the court: “When you violate the condition, the license disappears, meaning you’re simply a copyright infringer. This is the theory of the GPL and all CC licenses. Put precisely, whether or not they are also contracts, they are copyright licenses which expire if you fail to abide by the terms of the license.” Lessig said the ruling provided “important clarity and certainty by a critically important US Court.”

In August of 2007 the Northern District of California ruled that breach of certain terms of the open source license at issue, the Artistic License, is a mere contract violation and is not a form of infringement. Today’s ruling vacated the district court’s decision and affirmed the availability of remedies based on copyright law for violations of open licenses.  The federal court noted that ignoring attribution requirements contained in the license caused reputation and economic harm to the original licensor. This opinion demonstrates a strong understanding of a basic economic principles of the internet; attribution is a valuable economic right in the information economy.  We strongly recommend reading the opinion.

Creative Commons filed an Amici (friends of the court) brief with the CAFC in this case. This brief was cosponsored by the Linux Foundation, The Open Source Initiative, Software Freedom Law Center, the Perl Foundation and Wikimedia Foundation.  Significant pro bono work on this brief was provided by Anthony T. Falzone and Christopher K. Ridder of Stanford’s Center for Internet & Society.

Links

PDF of the Decision
http://www.cafc.uscourts.gov/opinions/08-1001.pdf

PDF of Amici Brief
http://jmri.sourceforge.net/k/docket/cafc-pi-1/ccc_brf.pdf

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Diane Peters

General Counsel
Creative Commons
diane@creativecommons.org

Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/presskit

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Singapore Announces Ported Creative Commons Licenses

Patricia Escalera, July 25th, 2008

San Francisco, CA, USA and Singapore City, Singapore — July 27, 2008

Today Creative Commons Singapore announces the completion of the locally ported Creative Commons licensing suite. In close collaboration with Centre for Asia Pacific Technology Law & Policy (CAPTEL), the Creative Commons team in Singapore, led by Associate Professor Samtani Anil and Assistant Professor Giorgos Cheliotis, adapted the licenses both linguistically and legally to Singaporean national law. The Creative Commons licenses, now ported to 47 jurisdictions, enable authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms in efforts to promote a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach to copyright.

The Singaporean Creative Commons licenses, available soon online, will be celebrated today in Singapore City at the International Symposium on Electronic Art. The event will also feature a panel, organized by CAPTEL and Creative Commons Singapore, to introduce the audience to key copyright issues in the digital age and also share tips for creators and users to avoid common pitfalls in the field of copyright law.

The panel will, in addition, explain the aims and philosophy of the Creative Commons initiative and the specific nature and uses of the Creative Commons licensing suite in Singapore. Stanford law professor and Creative Commons founder Lawrence Lessig will address the audience to commemorate the completion of the licenses.

Following the event, the CC Singapore team hopes to initiate a series of educational talks to explain the philosophy of Creative Commons and the practical ways in which users can implement the licenses.

Project Lead Samtani Anil adds, “We also believe the launch of the Singapore CC licenses will lead to a better appreciation of the ambit, contours, and limits of the existing copyright regime in Singapore in relation to the sharing and dissemination of culture and the advancement of innovation. This, we believe, will sensitize various stakeholders to the avenues that are open to them to share their works in accordance with their wishes and needs.”

The CC Singapore team is supported by team members Assistant Professor Warren Chik, Vinod Sabnani, Tham Kok Leong, Lam Chung Nian, Harish Pillay and Ankit Guglani.

About Centre for Asia Pacific Technology Law & Policy

Please visit http://captel.ntu.edu.sg for more information.

The Centre for Asia Pacific Technology Law & Policy (CAPTEL) is a research center founded to investigate and research issues on how businesses and economies are being affected by the challenges of new technologies on law, regulation and policy. CAPTEL is located at the Nanyang Business School, Nanyang Technological University.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Omidyar Network, the Hewlett Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation, as well as members of the public.

Please visit http://creativecommons.org for more information about Creative Commons.

Contact

Dr. Catharina Maracke
Director
Creative Commons International
catharina@creativecommons.org
+49.30.280.93.909

Press Kit
http://creativecommons.org/presskit
http://creativecommons.org/international/sg/

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Creative Commons Launches Web and Desktop License Integration Approach with LicenseChooser.js and liblicense Projects

Greg Grossmeier, July 23rd, 2008

SAN FRANCISCO, USA JULY 24, 2008

Creative Commons announced today the release of liblicense and LicenseChooser.js, content licensing tools which make integration of Creative Commons license functionality easy for developers building modern desktop and web applications. These tools enable reading and writing Creative Commons licensing information to a variety of media formats. Many projects already support the ability to read and write content license information through add-ons, including OpenOffice.org, Adobe Creative Suite and Microsoft Office. Other programs, such as the open source vector graphics drawing tool Inkscape, include a default capability to read and write CC license information.

For the desktop, Creative Commons has updated the C language-based software library called liblicense. This Free Software (licensed under GNU LGPL) library provides functionality to read and write license information into many supported media files. Along with access to license information, the library offers a standard set of icons for graphical representation of selected or discovered licenses. As Creative Commons’ international team refreshes the licenses or adds a new jurisdiction, software developers can simply update liblicense to receive these changes. Currently, liblicense is distributed with development versions of the Debian, Ubuntu, and Fedora Linux operating systems. The LGPL license permits adding it to both open source and proprietary software.

“LicenseChooser.js and liblicense will make open content licensing more valuable for developers, publishers, and users, by making such content more discoverable and manageable” said Mike Linksvayer, Vice President of Creative Commons.

One prominent project incorporating the use of liblicense in an upcoming release is One Laptop Per Child (OLPC). While the OLPC project wiki already uses Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licenses for contributions, Creative Commons has introduced licensing functionality for the XO laptops through the development of liblicense and a series of patches to be integrated. Once it is installed, it allows software interfacing with media on the device to be content license aware. Also, to explain Creative Commons licensing and the basics of copyright law, Creative Commons has created an educational licensing activity that anyone may install onto an OLPC XO laptop. This activity uses the previously released “Sharing Creative Works” comics.

For web applications, Creative Commons has developed LicenseChooser.js, which allows developers to add similar functionality into any web-based project. Creative Commons already provided an XML-based web services API. LicenseChooser.js provides an additional, lightweight method for integrating license selection into web applications. The widget is used by SixApart’s TypePad as well as the WordPress plugin WpLicense.

Today, liblicense will be demonstrated at this year’s Open Source Conference (OSCON) in Portland, OR. Integration with two Open Source applications will be showcased: the file viewer Eye of GNOME and media player Rhythmbox. The presentation will be given by Nathan Yergler, CTO of Creative Commons, and Asheesh Laroia, Software Engineer, on Thursday July 24th in room F150.

Links

Desktop Integration Software: liblicense

http://creativecommons.org/projects/liblicense

OSCON “Rights on the Desktop with liblicense” Presentation

http://en.oreilly.com/oscon2008/public/schedule/detail/2857

Web Integration Software: LicenseChooser.js

http://creativecommons.org/projects/LicenseChooser.js

OLPC Creative Commons Page

http://wiki.laptop.org/go/Creative_Commons

Creative Commons Sharing Creative Works Public Domain Released Comics

http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Sharing_Creative_Works

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Jon Phillips
Community and Business
Development Manager
Creative Commons
jon@creativecommons.org
+1.510.499.0894

Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/presskit

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Education Innovator Esther Wojcicki Joins Creative Commons Board

Tim Hwang, July 10th, 2008

San Francisco, CA – July 10, 2008

Creative Commons (CC), a global non-profit focused on the preservation and growth of a openly shareable and remixable media landscape, officially announced today that education innovator Esther Wojcicki has joined its Board of Directors.

Wojcicki has been a prominent figure in American education. As the leading mind behind the creation of the country’s largest high school journalism program, she has won numerous awards, including the prestigious title of Teacher of the Year from the California State Teacher Credentialing Commission. Most recently, she received special recognition for her work from the National Scholastic Press Association.

“We’re truly excited to have Esther on board. Her presence marks an important step in the developing role Creative Commons seeks to play in supporting open educational content” commented Joi Ito, CEO of CC, “Her experience and advice will be an invaluable part of shaping our future in that arena.

Esther Wojcicki said, “I am thrilled to be joining the talented team of directors, advisors, and staff at Creative Commons, whose collaborative efforts are supporting the expansion of the public domain. I look forward to applying my experience in education and technology, and am eager to work closely with the Board as this pioneering organization continues to grow.”

Wojcicki has also been a key pioneer in exploring the emerging interface between education and technology. She helped lay the groundwork for the design of the Google Teacher Outreach Program and Google Teacher Academy, a professional development event which trains teachers to leverage innovative technologies to enhance their classrooms.

Wojcicki joins a board of directors that includes technologist Joi Ito, cyberlaw and intellectual property experts James Boyle, Michael Carroll, Molly Shaffer Van Houweling, Eric Saltzman, and Lawrence Lessig, MIT computer science professor Hal Abelson, Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales, documentary filmmaker Davis Guggenheim, and Public Knowledge founder Laurie Racine.

More About Esther Wojcicki

Esther Wojcicki has been teaching Journalism and English at Palo Alto High School, Palo Alto, California for the past 25 years, where she has been the driving force behind the development of its award-winning journalism program. It is now the largest high school journalism program in the U.S involving 400 students. All the publications can be found at http://voice.paly.net which is the school publication website. In the spring of 2008, she was recognized for inspiration and excellence in scholastic journalism advising by the National Scholastic Press Association. She has won multiple awards throughout the years. A couple of others included the 1990 Northern California Journalism teacher of the year in 1990 and California State Teacher Credentialing Commission Teacher of the Year in 2002. She served on the University of California Office of the President Curriculum Committee where she helped revise the beginning and advanced journalism curriculum for the state of California. In 2005–6 she worked as the Google educational consultant and helped design the Google Teacher Outreach program, which includes the website www.google.com/educators and the Google Teacher Academy. She holds a B.A. degree from UC Berkeley in English and Political Science, a general secondary teaching credential from UC Berkeley, a graduate degree from the Graduate School of Journalism at Berkeley, an advanced degree in French and French History from the Sorbonne, Paris, a Secondary School Administrative Credential from San Jose State University, and a M.A. in Educational Technology from San Jose State University. She has also worked as a professional journalist for multiple publications and now blogs regularly for HuffingtonPost and HotChalk.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

CONTACT

Ahrash Bissell

Executive Director, ccLearn

Creative Commons

ahrash@creativecommons.org

PRESS KIT

http://creativecommons.org/presskit

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Creative Commons Launches Metrics Research Project

Tim Hwang, July 9th, 2008

San Francisco, CA – July 9, 2008

Today Creative Commons (CC) announced the official launch of the Metrics project, a broad-based open web-based initiative to encourage and collect research efforts on the adoption of CC licenses worldwide. With the launch of the Creative Commons Case Studies project last month, CC expanded the qualitative information available about license usage. The release of the Metrics project today extends the quantitative data available for further exploration and understanding of how Creative Commons licenses are spreading globally. The project wiki also extends an open invitation for users to join the research community to participate in analyzing data about Creative Commons licenses.

Nathan Yergler, CC’s CTO commented, “We’re extremely excited about the possibilities of opening up research on this topic to the public. Semantic Mediawiki, an extension that adds database-like capabilities to wikis, is a huge help in building a community around these issues.” Anyone is able to review the research aggregated at the Metrics portal, contribute information on existing works, or add their own original research. While it is impossible to do an authoritative search and calculation of the number of licensed works on the entire Internet, this project’s intent is to lower the barrier for participation in discovering more accurate statistics on CC licensing collaboratively.

Creative Commons license use is growing. As of June 2008, Creative Commons estimates that a minimum of 130 million creative works are licensed by creators opting to provide clear expression of how their works may be used. The Metrics project aims to facilitate understanding of how this mass adoption is shaping business and culture at-large. As Mike Linksvayer, Vice-President of CC, stated, “If we’re doing our job well, Creative Commons is enabling more creativity, innovation, and participation in culture. Metrics are vital to understanding how CC is transforming the creative ecosystem.”

Linksvayer added, “The Metrics project complements existing collaboration between CC and research groups internationally.” This includes the work by Giorgos Cheliotis and Warren Chik at the Participatory Media Lab, a research center based in Singapore, that is working with CC to tackle some of the analytical questions surrounding its progress worldwide. Cheliotis recently launched the Commons-Research website and mailing list which supports interdisciplinary collaboration among researchers studying commons-based peer production.

The release of the Metrics project is set to coincide with the First Interdisciplinary Research Workshop on Free Culture being held in Sapporo, Japan from July 30th to August 1st. This workshop, spearheaded by Cheliotis with Tyng-Ruey Chuang and Jonathan Zittrain, will bring together researchers and scholars from around the world to discuss commons-based peer production research and present their latest works in progress publicly. More information on how to participate in the Metrics project and relevant upcoming events are available on the Creative Commons Metrics project website.

LINKS

CC Metrics Project

Commons-Research Website and Conference

Commons-Research Mailing List

CC Case Studies Project

ABOUT CREATIVE COMMONS

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

CONTACTS

Jon Phillips
Community and Business Development Manager
Creative Commons
jon@creativecommons.org
+1.510.499.0894

PRESS KIT

http://creativecommons.org/presskit

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Creative Commons Launches Global Case Studies Project

Jon Phillips, June 23rd, 2008

Brisbane, Australia & San Francisco, USA — 2008 June 24

Today Creative Commons (CC), in association with Creative Commons Australia, officially announced the release of the Case Studies Project, which is a large-scale community effort to encourage all to explore and add noteworthy global CC stories. Creative Commons provides free tools to allow copyright-holders to clearly show rights associated with creative works, and now this project shows how notable adopters like author Cory Doctorow, web video-sharing company Blip.tv, and open film project “A Swarm of Angels” have successfully used CC licenses. And, to underline the collaborative global nature of this project, this launch coincides with Creative Commons Australia’s Conference “Building an Australasian Commons” today in Brisbane, where this project is also being announced along with the publication of a publicly available booklet with some of the best global case studies.

This wiki project aims to examine the motivations and outcomes of CC license adoption in a variety of different situations and highlights the work being done by the creators and content aggregators in the CC community. Anyone can explore the global CC landscape by browsing with a variety of filters including the license-types used, the media created, and whether the project curates or creates material. Some examples include the Google Summer of Code program, the Big Buck Bunny 2nd Open Source 3D animation led by the Blender Foundation, and Sony’s EyeVio video sharing social network service.

Beyond easily viewing the compilation, the Case Studies Project encourages users to edit the wiki and add innovative and noteworthy CC projects happening in jurisdictions worldwide. To lower the barriers for participation, the Case Studies Project provides contributors with an easy form to enter data into the wiki and examples of other featured initiatives. Instructions are available on the Case Studies site at: http://creativecommons.org/projects/casestudies.

The “Some Rights Reserved” model of Creative Commons licensing has had a significant impact world-wide, with millions of creators opting to share their content with their peers. Since its inception in 2002, the Creative Commons initiative has shown rapid growth, with more than 90 million works licensed as of December 2007. Numerous communities have also emerged, inspired by and founded on the CC licensing scheme, and the recognition, collaboration, and commercialization opportunities it provides. “It is important for both long-standing members of the community and new adopters alike to gain a sense of the motivations and experiences of others using Creative Commons licenses,” stated Creative Commons CEO, Joi Ito. “The Case Studies project provides all with a platform to explore how important adopters like Google, Nine Inch Nails, and Sony successfully use Creative Commons while also allowing anyone to add their own Creative Commons success story. Case studies are important to show that the idea of businesses using CC isn’t just a cute idea, but a fact in their success story.”

Since this is a community-based open project, the roadmap for participation is available on the project website, and communication is encouraged on the cc-community mailing list. The next milestones for contributing to this project are the Communia/CC Europe meetings June 30-July 1 in Belgium, FSCONS on October 25-26 in Gothenburg, Sweden, and iSummit on July 29-August 1 in Sapporo, Japan. Each of these events will have presentations about the progress of this project along with community contributions presented publicly.

The initiative will also find its way into the print medium regularly. Working with the user-generated Case Studies material, CC Australia is releasing “Building an Australasian Commons Booklet,” the first of a number of planned printed publications based on the project. The book is a first attempt to chronicle the tales of the Australasian commons. Featuring over 60 case studies, it maps the current state of play surrounding free culture in the region. From private individuals to large corporations, the studies clearly show the mechanisms and motivations to share and experiment without the restrictions of the pre-digital era. Across the domains of democratic change, filmmaking, music, visual arts, libraries, museums, government, education and research, the book will explore how Australasian creators working with CC licensing are making their mark. This follows past projects in the same vein, such as their report “Asia and the Commons Case Studies,” a review of CC-based initiatives in the region.

Links

CC Case Studies Project
http://creativecommons.org/projects/casestudies

Building an Australasian Commons Conference in Brisbane, Australia
http://creativecommons.org.au/australasiancommons

Case Studies Roadmap
http://creativecommons.org/projects/casestudies_roadmap

Creative Commons Community Mailing List (cc-community)
http://creativecommons.org/contact

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

About Creative Commons Australia

Creative Commons Australia (CCau) is the Australian derivative project of the Creative Commons project in the United States of America. Currently, they are engaged in porting the Creative Commons licenses into Australian domestic law and fostering a creative community premised on remixable creativity. Hosted at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, CCau is devoted to the promotion of Creative Commons in Australia. Australia is one of 43 countries world wide who have taken up the Creative Commons project. For more information about Creative Commons Australia, visit: http://creativecommons.org.au

Contact

Jon Phillips
Community + Business Development Manager
Creative Commons
jon@creativecommons.org

Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/presskit

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Experts in Norway adapt CC licenses to national law / Eksperter i Norge tilpasser CC-lisenser til nasjonal lovgivning

Michelle Thorne, June 5th, 2008

[Text in English and Norwegian]

Oslo, Norway and Berlin, Germany — June 6, 2008

The Creative Commons Norway team has successfully ported the Creative Commons licensing suite to Norwegian law. The localized licenses will be unveiled today at a press conference at Oslo University College.

The team responsible for coordinating the porting process and public discussion with local and international legal experts consists of Haakon Flage Bratsberg, Thomas Gramstad, Gisle Hannemyr (Public Project Lead), Tore Hoel, Peter Lenda (Legal Project Lead), and Vebjørn Søndersrød.

“We have taken the initiative to launch the Creative Commons licenses in Norway to promote new forms of production, sharing and distribution of creative works,” explains the team’s Public Project Lead, Gisle Hannemyr. “To achieve this, we have been going through a process of adapting the international license to Norwegian copyright legislation. During this process, we have worked together with community stakeholders and copyright experts to reach a result that both reflects the spirit of Creative Commons and the letter of Norwegian copyright law.”

The launch event will be held as a press conference at Oslo University College on June 6th at 10:00 am. The Creative Commons Norway team will be present and give a brief presentation about Creative Commons and the licenses translated into Norwegian. The team will also be available to answer questions.

Norway is the forty-sixth jurisdiction worldwide to port the Creative Commons licensing suite.

About Oslo University College

Oslo University College is a young, dynamic institution based on strong traditions. It was established in 1994 when the Norwegian college system was restructured and 18 smaller colleges in the Oslo area merged. Oslo University College offers the broadest portfolio of professional studies available in Norway. OUC is a dynamic institution based on strong traditions in professional education and research. With 11,000 students, OUC are the fourth largest educational institution in Norway. For more information about Oslo University College, please visit: http://www.hio.no/content/view/full/4563.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, the Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Dr. Catharina Maracke
Director
Creative Commons International, Creative Commons
catharina [at] creativecommons [dot] org

Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/presskit
http://creativecommons.org/international/no/

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Eksperter i Norge tilpasser CC-lisenser til nasjonal lovgivning

Oslo, Norge og Berlin, Tyskland – 6. juni 2008

Arbeidsgruppen i Creative Commons Norge har fullført arbeidet med å oversette og tilpasse Creative Commons-lisensene til norsk. De ferdige lisensene vil bli offentliggjort i dag på en pressekonferanse på Høgskolen i Oslo.

Arbeidsgruppen som har koordinert arbeidet med å tilpasse lisensene, og gjennomført en offentlig diskusjon om innholdet i dem med lokale og internasjonale opphavsrettseksperter, har bestått av Haakon Flage Bratsberg, Thomas Gramstad, Gisle Hannemyr (offentlig prosjektleder), Tore Hoel, Peter Lenda (juridisk prosjektleder), og Vebjørn Søndersrød.

“Vi har ønsker å gjøre Creative Commons-lisensene tilgjengelig i Norge for å fremme nye former for produksjon, deling og distribusjon av kreative verk,” forklarer arbeidsgruppens offentlig prosjektleder, Gisle Hannemyr. “For å oppnå dette, har vi tilpasset de internasjonale lisensene til norsk opphavsrettlovgivning. I løpet av denne prosessen har vi jobbet sammen med interessenter og opphavsrettseksperter for å komme fram til et resultat som reflekterer både Creative Commons’ ånd og åndsverklovens bestemmelser.”

I samband med lanseringen vil det bli holdt en pressekonferanse på Høgskolen i Oslo på 6 juni på 10:00. Arbeidsgruppen i Creative Commons Norge vil være tilstede og gi en kort presentasjon om Creative Commons og de norske lisensene. Arbeidsgruppen vil også være tilgjengelig for å svare på spørsmål.

Norge er den førti-sjette jurisdiksjon i verden som har tilpasset Creative Commons-lisensene til nasjonal lovgiving.

Om Høgskolen i Oslo

Høgskolen i Oslo er en ung, dynamisk institusjon basert på sterke tradisjoner. Den ble etablert i 1994 når norsk det norske høyskole-systemet ble omstrukturert og 18 mindre høyskoler i Oslo-området ble slått sammen. Høgskolen i Oslo har det bredeste tilbud av faglige studier i Norge. HiO er en dynamisk institusjon basert på sterke tradisjoner i faglig utdanning og forskning. Med 11000 studenter, HiO er den fjerde største utdanningsinstitusjon i Norge. For mer informasjon om Høgskolen i Oslo, se: http://www.hio.no/content/view/full/4563.

Om Creative Commons

Creative Commons er en ideell organisasjon, grunnlagt i 2001, med det mål å fremme fremmer kreativ gjen bruk av litterære og kunstneriske arbeider, enten disse er opphavsrettslig beskyttet eller er i det fri. Gjennom sine opphavsretts-lisenser tilbyr Creative Commons forfattere, kunstnere, forskere, og lærere muligheten til å velge mellom beskyttelser og friheter som muliggjør deling gjennom en tilnærming som best kan beskrives med ordene: “noen rettigheter reservert”. Creative Commons mottar støtte fra blant annet: Center for the Public Domain, the Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, og The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, samt private donasjoner. For mer informasjon om Creative Commons, se: http://creativecommons.org.

Dr. Catharina Maracke
Director
Creative Commons International, Creative Commons
catharina [at] creativecommons [dot] org

Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/presskit
http://creativecommons.org/international/no/

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Creative Commons announces major funding support from Omidyar Network

Eric Steuer, May 28th, 2008

San Francisco — 2008 May 28

Creative Commons announces that it has received $500,000 as the first installment of a gift of $2.5 million over five years from Omidyar Network. This gift is made to Creative Commons as part of the “5×5 Challenge” grant program, from which Creative Commons expects to receive $2.5 million annually in general operating support for each of the next five years. The 5×5 program was initiated at the invitation of The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. In addition to the Hewlett Foundation and Omidyar Network, other major funders participating in the 5×5 Challenge include the International Electronic Trade and Services Initiative (“IETSI”), a nonprofit trust founded to support the development of ecommerce, globally, as well as Google, Mozilla, and Red Hat.

Creative Commons is the San Francisco-based not-for-profit organization that provides free copyright licenses that allow creators to mark their works with a range of permissions granted to others. To date, Creative Commons licenses are attached to millions of artistic, scientific, and educational works distributed by their creators over the Internet.

This gift comes at a historic moment for Creative Commons, which recently launched an initiative to explore its possible roles in connection with a digital copyright registry system.

“Omidyar Network has been a leader in encouraging nonprofit organizations to become both more finely tuned to their users’ needs and more self-sustaining,” said Creative Commons CEO Joi Ito. “Omidyar Network’s grant will support Creative Commons’ basic promise: to provide free, simple tools that allow the creators of the world to share their works on generous terms. In addition, the grant will allow us to explore providing fee-based, value-added services, which can benefit our community and help support the organization financially. The registry is our first big project in which we plan to explore these possibilities.”

“Creative Commons has transformed the way people think about intellectual property,” said Matt Bannick, managing partner of Omidyar Network. “Creative Commons licenses have dramatically lowered the transaction costs for use of many digital works, and an open, interoperable digital copyright registry system would continue to decrease those costs, as well as increase the visibility of many more creative works. We are delighted to help enable the exploration of this system and to see Creative Commons, an organization that we have long supported, take an important step in its growth toward sustainability.”

For more information on the Creative Commons registry project, see http://creativecommons.org/projects/registry.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Mike Linksvayer
Vice President, Creative Commons
ml at creativecommons dot org

Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/presskit

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Creative Commons explores a digital copyright registry system

Eric Steuer, May 22nd, 2008

San Francisco, CA USA — May 22, 2008

Creative Commons today announced that it is exploring possible roles in connection with a digital copyright registry system.

Creative Commons is the San Francisco-based not-for-profit organization which provides free copyright licenses that allow creators to mark their works in advance with a range of permissions granted to others. This licensing model eliminates many of the high transaction costs entailed by the current default of copyright systems worldwide, which automatically grant full copyright to all creators. Creative Commons licenses have been attached to millions of artistic, scientific and educational works distributed by their creators over the Internet.

“Key to the success of the Creative Commons licenses is the fact that the metadata that expresses the rights associated with a digital copy of the work, also allows the work to be searchable,” says Creative Commons CEO Joi Ito. “For example, anyone who is looking for a great song to back a video, a photograph to illustrate an article, or curricular materials on ecology or astronomy for K-12 students, can go to the Creative Commons website or use Google or Yahoo to find works available under CC licenses. But we have come to believe that both creators and users would benefit from the greatly enhanced search and locate functionality that a comprehensive digital registry of copyrighted works would permit.”

While current US law does not require copyright owners to register their works with the Copyright Office, doing so provides some benefits under the law, particularly if the owner files a lawsuit for copyright infringement. The Copyright Office maintains a registry where copyright owners may now voluntarily register their works, for a fee. However, there has been interest in many sectors, including the commercial sector, in developing alternatives or supplements to the government registry. In particular, recent debate on the issue of “orphan works” — works whose authors are not known and cannot easily be found — has prompted much discussion of the ability of the existing government system to handle registration of certain kinds of works, particularly visual works.

“On the Internet, if something can’t be found, for practical purposes it doesn’t exist,” Ito continues. “Creative Commons is undertaking a logical extension of its mission by exploring what a truly open and interoperable registry would look like. CC may not create and operate a registry itself, although our doing that, perhaps as part of a distributed network, could prove to be a great solution for both creators and users of works. We are fundamentally interested in helping to establish standards and protocols that in principle would enable all digital works to be registered across various systems that might be managed by a number of different organizations.”

“We see that a registry could provide a service that is already viewed as important to the growth of the digital economy, and we believe that Creative Commons is well positioned to play an important role here, given the expertise we have gained through over five years of providing open licensing tools, and our ability to draw on the legal and technical expertise of an international group of partners. So we are excited to be undertaking this exploration of our possible role in building this piece of digital infrastructure, with the community,” Ito explains. “We also will be exploring possible additional fee based, value added services that CC might be able to provide, as a means of helping the organization to become self sustaining while we continue to serve the public interest. It is in everyone’s interest that Creative Commons develop sustainable methods of supporting our work: the global infrastructure of sharing has to be reliable and permanent. At the same time, we remain committed to maintaining CC’s role in providing free tools to everyone who wants to share their work with the world. That will never change.”

The first public meeting in connection with the Creative Commons registry initiative will be held in Silicon Valley on June 18. For more information, please visit http://creativecommons.org/projects/registry.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain. Through its free copyright licenses, Creative Commons offers authors, artists, scientists, and educators the choice of a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to enable a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons was built with and is sustained by the generous support of organizations including the Center for the Public Domain, Omidyar Network, The Rockefeller Foundation, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Mike Linksvayer
Vice President, Creative Commons
ml at creativecommons dot org

Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/presskit

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