Armenia

Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia Discussing License Drafts

Michelle Thorne, December 18th, 2008

Legal experts in the South Caucasus are making major strides in the Creative Commons license porting process with the completion of license drafts from Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia. Regional stakeholders are publicly discussing the three drafts on the CC South Caucasus mailing list. As with all ported CC licenses, the license discussions are aided by English re-translations and explanations of the necessary legal changes.

With the support of the Eurasia Partnership Foundation, CC Project Leads in the South Caucasus have been  developing the CC licensing infrastructure in their countries since May 2008. Their efforts build upon base-line assessments of national copyright legislation and direct consultations with community members, the results of which were analyzed during a recent regional workshop in Tbilisi.

On behalf of CC Armenia, CC Azerbaijan, and CC Georgia, we warmly welcome you to join the public discussion. Congratulations to Project Leads Movses Hakobyan (AM), Elmari Mamishov and Ramil Iskandarov (AZ), Dr. Nino Kuntseva-Gabashvili, Merab Labadze, and Zviad Sulaberidze (GE), and to the Eurasia Partnership Foundation for their continued support!

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Bulgarian President Chooses CC BY ND

Michelle Thorne, December 4th, 2008

The official website of the Bulgarian President Georgi Parvanov is now available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 2.5 Bulgarian license. Bulgaria’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs has been releasing its material under the same license since 2006, but ordinarily, these websites would be under full copyright, explains CC Bulgaria Project Lead

Bulgaria has taken a step in the right direction to complete its image as a country where the politicians are aware of the most advanced technologies and use them for the good of the society,” Veni

Government leaders in other countries are also choosing similar paths. The Armenian President Serzh Sargsyan licenses his official website under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported license, and governments in Australia and Mexico (pdf) use and recommend CC. Another licensing decision already bearing fruit is Change.gov, the website of US president-elect Barack Obama’s transition team, which is published under the most permissive of Creative Commons copyright licenses – CC Attribution 3.0 Unported.

For a listing of more governmental uses of CC, please visit our wiki page: http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Government_use_of_CC_licenses.

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Bombardirovka

Cameron Parkins, November 19th, 2008

Last night I had the pleasure of attending Art Knows No Borders, an event that was both a fundraiser for Doctors Without Borders and a release party for Bombardirovka, a book written by Crystal Allen Cook in 2004 while she was in Armenia on a Fulbright Scholarship. The novel is a work of fiction that, in the words of Cook, functions “to observe, up close, how the past, not necessarily even our own personal past, lives on the actions and bodies of people living in the present.”

Bombardirovka is free to download and released under a CC BY-NC-SA license, meaning it can be re-used and adapted in any way as long as it is non-commercial in intent, shared under the same license as the original, and Crystal Cook is properly attributed. Check out the Share Novel page on Bombardirovka‘s website in the coming weeks to find more about interesting reuse opportunities ahead.

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Regional Workshop in Caucasus Leading CC Projects to First License Drafts

Michelle Thorne, October 31st, 2008

On October 23, CC Legal and Public Project Leads from Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia met in Tbilisi, Georgia for a workshop to discuss the CCi license porting process in their jurisdictions. The workshop was facilitated by representatives of the Eurasia Partnership Foundation (EPF) and Nena Antic, Legal Project Lead from CC Serbia.

At the workshop, the Project Leads from the South Caucasus presented base-line assessments of their jurisdiction’s copyright legislation, a follow-up to the detailed reports they conducted in summer 2008. The results were evaluated to determine the steps required to port the core CC licenses to the legal framework in each respective jurisdiction.

Nena Antic shared her experience with the CCi license porting process in Serbia by highlighting the main obstacles, lessons learned, and CC Serbia’s tangible results so far. Nena provided in-depth explanations for the changes she introduced to adapt the CC licensing suite to Serbian law and led the workshop’s discussion on legal terminology, the NC & ND license elements, and Collective Rights Management.

Vazgen Karapetyan, EPF’s Senior Cross-Border Programs Officer and co-organizer of the workshop, remarked, “As a whole, the workshop proved highly instrumental in familiarizing the participating Affiliate Institutions with the successful experience of their Serbian counterpart. Learning about the necessary changes to port the CC licenses will definitely help the Legal Project Leads in Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia develop their own first draft licenses.”

The first drafts from the three South Caucasus nations are expected to enter the public discussion on December 1, 2008.

The CC license porting commenced in the South Caucasus in May 2008 when the EPF announced a regional grant competition titled Support to the Adoption of Creative Commons Licensing Framework in the Countries of the South Caucasus. The Center for Information Law and Policy (Armenia) and the Young Lawyers Union (Azerbaijan) were identified as competition winners. On July 14, 2008, the two organizations were awarded individual grants to implement their 12-month projects in collaboration with Creative Commons International. In Georgia, a team of local legal experts representing Business Intelligence and Valuation GROUP – “BVG”, Ltd. was contracted by EPF/Georgia to oversee the CC Georgia project in partnership with the above Armenian and Azerbaijani organizations and CCi.

Image: “Tbilisi Old District” in the public domain.

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