brooklyn museum

CC Talks With: Brooklyn Museum

Cameron Parkins, February 5th, 2010

Regarding openness and sharing, the Brooklyn Museum is an exemplary institution. They are major contributors to The Commons on Flickr, license their online image collection under a CC Attribution-NonCommerical license license, provide API access to this collection, and recently ran a CC-licensed remix contest with Blondie‘s Chris Stein. Needless to say, we were eager to catch up with Shelley Bernstein, Brooklyn Museum’s Chief of Technology, and learn more about how they are using our licenses to open up their catalog of amazing work, shaping the role museums play in a digital age in the process.

Can you give our readers some background on your role at the Brooklyn Museum? BM’s Twitter page describes you as the “Museum’s Chief Geek” – what does that entail?

Officially, I’m the Brooklyn Museum’s Chief of Technology, which means I work with a team of folks here to manage the Brooklyn Museum’s web presence, our gallery technology, and our computer network.

BM’s digital stamp is impressive – an active blog, social network presence, and the 1stfans program in particular all point to an organization that uses technology to better engage its community. What is the benefit, from your end, to this sort of interaction?

A big part of the Brooklyn Museum’s mission is about growing community and visitor experience, so much of what we do online closely ties into that. The blog, the social networking and 1stfans all help put a personal face on the institution and, we hope, allow visitors a chance to see what goes on here direct from staff and interact with us on a very personal level. This kind of engagement grows a more natural relationship with our constituents and one that we hope makes the institution very accessible.

BM licenses all of its images under a CC Attribution-NonCommerical license. Why did you choose this license and what has the experience been like? Have there been any interesting cases of re-use?
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Brooklyn Museum & Blondie’s Chris Stein launch CC-licensed remix project

Cameron Parkins, October 22nd, 2009

4On October 30th, Brooklyn Museum will open Who Shot Rock & Roll, an exhibition commemorating photographers and their creative role in rock & roll history. To celebrate, the museum has teamed up with Chris Stein – co-founder of the legendary new wave band Blondie (and one of the photographers featured in the exhibit) – for a companion musical project called Who Shot Drums and Bass.

Drums and Bass is made up of eight original songs composed by Stein in DrumCore and released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike license. Brooklyn Museum is asking remixers to download the tracks from its Soundcloud page and remix them for the Who Shot Rock & Roll: Remix! contest. Remixes are due December 1st, and will be judged by Stein and Matthew Yokobosky – Brooklyn Museum’s Chief Designer. The creator of the winning remix will receive a copy of the Who Shot Rock & Roll companion book signed by author Gail Buckland and have their remix featured during the Target First Saturday party in January.

More info, including contest rules and registration, is available Brooklyn Museum’s website.

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Announcing October’s CC Salon NYC

Fred Benenson, September 21st, 2009

CC Salon NYC Logo

CC Salon NYC is back with a brand new home! The Open Planning Project has generously offered their incredible penthouse for the October salon.

So come out to have some beers with the CC community watch some cool presentations, and meet some new faces in the free culture space.

October’s Salon will feature short presentations from Adam Clark Estes, director of citizen journalism at the Huffington Post Investigative Fund talking about how the HuffPo is using CC to fuel the future of journalism, Shelley Bernstein, Chief Technology Officer of the Brooklyn Museum discussing their amazing community and commons efforts, and one more special guest TBA.

Here are the details:

Monday, October 5th, from 7-10pm
The Open Planning Project
148 Lafayette St
Between Grand & Howard
New York, NY

We’ll have free (as in beer) beer. If you’ve didn’t make it to any past CC Salons, don’t miss this one, and if you did, you’ll know to come early as space is limited.

RSVP to the event via Facebook or by e-mailing me: fred [at] creativecommons.org.

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Brooklyn Museum’s API

Fred Benenson, March 6th, 2009

Brooklyn Museum In case it weren’t evidenced by their participation in Wikipedia Loves Art, The Brooklyn Museum is an institution that simply “gets it.On Tuesday, they launched an API.

The Brooklyn Museum Collection API consists of a set of methods that return structured data and links to images from the museum’s collections. This is particularly exciting since all of the images owned by Brooklyn Museum are licensed under our Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerviatives license.

To get an idea of what can be created based on their API take a look at this clever example of an interactive time line of objects in the catalog ranging from 4010 B.C.E. to now.

Piotr Adamczyk has already created a simple set of Yahoo! Pipes that allow anyone to execute the basic API functions without having to write their own code.

Keep up the great work Brooklyn Museum!

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Wikipedia Loves Art Launches this Weekend

Fred Benenson, February 6th, 2009

Following up the success of Wikis Take Manhattan, a new project, Wikipedia Loves Art is launching this weekend:

Wikipedia Loves Art is a scavenger hunt and free content photography contest among museums and cultural institutions worldwide, and aimed at illustrating Wikipedia articles. The event is planned to run for the whole month of February 2009. Although there are planned events at each location, you can go on your own at any time during the month.

I had the opportunity to chat with Wikipedia’s founder and CC board member, Jimmy Wales about why Wikipedia Loves Art is so important. Check out the video on blip.tv (apologies for the lack of professional lighting).

Jimmy Wales on Wikipedia Loves ArtThe project is coordinated by the Brooklyn Museum, with the participation of the Carnegie Museum of Art, the Film Society of Lincoln Center, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, the Houston Museum of Natural Science, the Hunter Museum of American Art, the Indianapolis Museum of Art, The Jewish Museum (New York), the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the New York Historical Society, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Taft Museum of Art, the Victoria and Albert Museum. In all, there are 15 different museums and cultural institutions participating.

Sign up and go have fun helping the public domain grow on Wikipedia!

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Brooklyn Museum Licenses Works Under CC

Cameron Parkins, December 17th, 2008


Egypt: Looking out to Sea, Port Said | The Commons: Brooklyn Museum Collection

Our new affinity for micro-blogging has been a huge success so far, allowing us to engage with those in the CC community in a more personal and exciting manner. One of the biggest rewards is that we are finding out about a bevy of cool projects using CC that would have otherwise slipped under our radar.

This tweet by The Brooklyn Museum got our particular interest – everything they hold the copyright to is released under a CC BY-NC-ND license, allowing for free sharing of their content. This should come as no surprise considering their contribution to Flickr: The Commons (joined today by the New York Public Library) and their new “socially networked museum membership”, 1st fans, but is an inspiring choice nonetheless.

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