harvard

A Brief Overview of U.S. Public Policy on OER from California’s Community Colleges to the Obama Administration

Jane Park, October 2nd, 2009

The Publius Project at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society offers a new essay on OER and public policy in the United States: A Brief Overview of U.S. Public Policy on OER from California’s Community Colleges to the Obama Administration . Written by Carolina Rossini and Erhardt Graeff, it does a great job of pointing out the major recent movements toward OER in state and federal governments, and thoughtfully evaluates the issues that each initiative brings to the table.

“This post draws significantly from an interview on August 10, 2009 with Hal Plotkin, a Senior Advisor at the U.S. Dept. of Education, who has closely followed and been involved with OER policies in California. The interview was part of research on the educational materials sector being conducted under the Industrial Cooperation Project at the Berkman Center at Harvard University. The research is part of a broader project being led by Prof. Yochai Benkler and coordinated by Carolina Rossini. In the research, we are seeking to understand the approaches to innovation in some industrial sectors, such as alternative energy, educational materials, and biotechnology. The intention is to map the degree to which open and commons-based practices are being used compared to proprietary approaches and what forces drive the adoption and development of these models.”

Like all content on the Publius site, the essay is available via CC BY-SA.

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Free Culture Research Workshop 2009 CFP

Mike Linksvayer, July 11th, 2009

The Free Culture Research Workshop 2009 is looking for scholars working on:

  • Studies on the use and growth of open/free licensing models
  • Critical analyses of the role of Creative Commons or similar models in promoting a Free Culture
  • Building innovative technical, legal, organizational, or business solutions and interfaces between the sharing economy and the commercial economy
  • Modeling incentives, innovation and community dynamics in open collaborative peer production and in related social networks
  • Economic models for the sustainability of commons-based production
  • Successes and failures of open licensing
  • Analyses of policies, court rulings or industry moves that influence the future of Free Culture
  • Regional studies of Free Culture with global lessons/implications
  • Lessons from implementations of open/free licensing and distribution models for specific communities
  • Definitions of openness and freedom for different media types, users and communities
  • Broader sociopolitical, legal and cultural implications of Free Culture initiatives and peer production practices
  • Free Culture, Memory Institutions and the broader Public Sector
  • Open Science/ Research/ Education
  • Cooperation theory and practice, dynamics of cooperation and competition
  • Methodological approaches for studying the characteristics, history, impact or growth of Free Culture

It is tremendously exciting to see the commons attracting this research interest. The workshop will be held October 23 at Harvard. Submissions are due August 9.

Also see the last year’s post on the First Interdisciplinary Research Workshop on Free Culture.

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Harvard panel (12/12/08) video now online

Allison Domicone, April 30th, 2009

Photo by dsearls under CC BY-SA

Photo by dsearls under CC BY-SA

As many of you may remember, last December CC paired up with Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society to host a panel discussion entitled, “The Commons: Celebrating accomplishments, discerning futures.” Panelists included James Boyle, The Public Domain; Lawrence Lessig, Remix; Joi Ito, Free Souls; and Molly S. Van Houweling, Creative Commons’ first Executive Director. Jonathan Zittrain, of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, moderated.

A video of the panel discussion is now available at Internet Archive for you to watch and download.

We hope you’ll enjoy the video, which offers an intimate glimpse into CC’s history through the eyes of the people who were there from the beginning. Larry, Molly, Jamie and Joi each recall some wonderful stories and anecdotes from the early days of CC, and offer up new perspectives on where the organization should be headed. It’s a great video that speaks to the importance and relevance of CC as an organization and a leader in the move toward a more participatory culture.

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Harvard Panel Followup

Fred Benenson, December 20th, 2008

Good news! In case you missed our very special panel at Harvard Law School, we have plenty of media for you.

First, there’s video of the entire panel up on YouTube and higher resolution versions are also available over at the Berkman Center.

What makes this panel so interesting (and why you should take some time to enjoy it over the holidays) is that it offers an intimate glimpse into CC’s history through the eyes of the people who were there from the beginning. Larry, Molly, Jamie and Joi recall some wonderful stories and anecdotes from the early days of CC and offer up new perspectives on where the organization should be headed. Put simply, this is a must watch if you’re interested in our history.

Also check out my photos of the panel and reception afterwards, and Doc Searls also has some shots as well.

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Finals Club

Cameron Parkins, October 29th, 2008

Finals Club is a new website that aims to provide an online space for college students to blog about class lectures as well as converse in forums on a range of academic topics. Students can form groups, invite their friends to join, and assign tasks all with the goal of a more comprehensive learning experience and, as the Harvard Crimson points out, increased “transparency among study groups.”

All of the user-generated content at Finals Club is released under a CC BY-NC license, keeping the content created therein open and free to use for future students. While currently only available at a select group of universities, Finals Club shows great promise as a platform for students to collaborate academically in an open manner.

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Berkman celebrates recent publication of Born Digital: Understanding The First Generation of Digital Natives in San Francisco

Melissa Reeder, September 2nd, 2008

Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society (where the idea of CC originated) will be venturing out of Cambridge, MA in order to celebrate the release of their newest publication on Sept. 15th at Hotel Vitale, right here in San Francisco. Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives by John Palfrey and Urs Gasser, explores many of the key issues at the intersection of new technology and young people, including privacy, safety, creativity, learning, civic engagement. Details are below and we hope to see you there!

Book Talk and Reception:
Monday, September 15th, 2008
6:00PM, to be followed by a cocktail reception.
Free and open to the public, no RSVP required

Location
Hotel Vitale
8 Mission St
San Francisco, CA 94105
(415) 278-3700
Directions and map

The book talk and reception is generously co-hosted by: David Hornik of August Capital, the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology, Creative Commons, Tod Cohen of eBay Inc., the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Stanford’s Center for Internet & Society, and Meg Garlinghouse of Yahoo! Inc.

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Publius Project Explores the Rules of Cyberspace

Jane Park, May 20th, 2008

Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society launched a new project last week: Publius. The Publius Project is a Web 2.0 version of the Federalist Papers, a collection of passionate essays written in support of the U.S. Constitution–mostly signed “Publius”. 

The Publius Project “brings together a distinguished collection of Internet observers, scholars, innovators, entrepreneurs, activists, technologists, and still other experts to write short essays, foster a public dialogue, and create a durable record of how the rules of cyberspace are being formed — with a view to affecting their future incarnations.”

The most recent essay, posted today, is titled “Muddling Through Internet Governance”. All essays are signed by their authors and licensed CC BY.

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