Video

Al Jazeera Launches Creative Commons Repository

Fred Benenson, January 13th, 2009

Al Jazeera Creative Commons RepositoryAl Jazeera is releasing 12 broadcast quality videos today shot in Gaza under Creative Commons’ least restrictive Attribution license. Each professionally recorded video has a detailed information page and is hosted on blip.tv allowing for easy downloads of the original files and integration into Miro. The value of this footage is best described by an International Herald Tribune/New York Times article describing the release:

In a conflict where the Western news media have been largely prevented from reporting from Gaza because of restrictions imposed by the Israeli military, Al Jazeera has had a distinct advantage. It was already there.

More importantly, the permissive CC-BY license means that the footage can be used by anyone including, rival broadcasters, documentary makers, and bloggers, so long as Al Jazeera is credited.

There’s more information over at Al Jazeera’s CC repository, and in our press release. You can also add the Al Jazeera repository to your Miro feeds by clicking here.

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Make: television

Cameron Parkins, January 12th, 2009

MAKE_TV_colorMake: television is a new TV program from the wonderful crew behind MAKE Magazine that focuses on DIY culture and “celebrates “Makers” – the inventors, artists, geeks and just plain everyday folks who mix new and old technology to create new-fangled marvels.”

The show began airing on public television (broadcast/cable tv) a little over a week ago and is also available on Legal Torrents, blip.tv, Vimeo, YouTube, and iTunes. The show is released under a CC BY-NC-SA license and available for download in HD, allowing all those inventive DIY-ers watching the show the ability to remix and reuse the content under the terms specified.

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CC Talks With: Deproduction

Cameron Parkins, January 12th, 2009

Deproduction is a Denver-based video production company that has a variety of media incarnations, from Public Access TV aggregate Denver Open Media to civic pixel, an open-source web development group. All the material produced for DOM is released under a CC BY-NC-SA license, making it freely sharable and remixable as long as the creators are properly attributed, reproductions are noncommercial in intent, and any derivative works are shared under the same license. The project has been so successful that the team behind it recently received a Knight NewsChallenge Grant to reproduce their system at Public Access TV stations around the U.S. We caught up with Tony Shawcross, Executive Director at Deproduction, to learn more about their operation, how they are using CC licenses at DOM, and why Public Access TV is important.

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Can you give our readers some background on Deproduction? How did you get started, who is involved, and what do you do?

The early history is summarized in a great Apogee Magazine Article from 2004, back when we were still a 2-person organization. In the 5 years since, the organization grew from collaborations with a handful of local nonprofits, including Free Speech TV, Little Voice Productions, Just Media, and the Pan African Arts Society. We had been producing videos for nonprofit partners, and began expanding our media education programs through work with local schools and an office in the PS1 Charter School. In 2005, Denver’s City Council shut down the City’s Public Access TV Station and issued an RFP from organizations who had a plan for making Public Access TV work with no operating support from the city or Comcast.

We responded, borrowing from the models of Wikipedia, Current TV, and others to develop online systems that could enable our community members to manage the station. Where most Public Access TV stations have staff devoted to content ingest, metadata entry, quality-control, equipment reservations, class registrations, broadcast scheduling and so-on, our tools enable the community to complete all those tasks with minimal staff involvement. Furthermore, our approach to studio productions, editing and even training work to reduce the workload on our staff and maximize the cooperation and support of our members.
Read More…

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Funny or Die and Zhura Team Up for Copyleft Screenwriting

Fred Benenson, January 12th, 2009

The aptly named Funny or Die comedy community has launched a competition with the free on-line screen writing software site Zhura. All contributions must be licensed under our copyleft license, Attribution-ShareAlike (BY-SA) so that Funny or Die’s producers can create the shows freely. Consequently, Funny or Die episodes based on submissions to the competition will be reciprocally licensed under BY-SA as well:

Q. What if I don’t want anyone to touch my script?
A. In order to be considered by the head writers for production, your script MUST carry the BY-SA Creative Commons License. This does two things: It lets Funny Or Die UK produce your sketch and it allows Zhura members (and Funny or Die UK head writers) edit your script as necessary to make it better (sorry).

If you’ve been itching to show the web how funny you are, now’s your chance. Read more about the competition over at Zhura’s site.

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Lessig/Colbert remixes on ccMixter

Mike Linksvayer, January 12th, 2009

CC founder Lawrence Lessig appeared on the Colbert Report last Thursday talking about his latest book, REMIX. The segment was great, and hilarious, as is typical for Colbert — and double plus fun for copyright geeks and activists, as Colbert challenged the audience to not remix the interview “with some great dance beat, and then it starts showing up in clubs across America.”

Lessig pointed out on air that because he didn’t waive his joint copyrights to the segment, he and Colbert are joint owners, and either can exploit the work freely. In this case Lessig has published the interview under CC BY, allowing anyone to remix or even commercially exploit the work for free.

The interview “accapella” is up on ccMixter, where it is rapidly being remixed with great dance beats (see “samples used in:” on the right).

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Harvard Panel Followup

Fred Benenson, December 20th, 2008

Good news! In case you missed our very special panel at Harvard Law School, we have plenty of media for you.

First, there’s video of the entire panel up on YouTube and higher resolution versions are also available over at the Berkman Center.

What makes this panel so interesting (and why you should take some time to enjoy it over the holidays) is that it offers an intimate glimpse into CC’s history through the eyes of the people who were there from the beginning. Larry, Molly, Jamie and Joi recall some wonderful stories and anecdotes from the early days of CC and offer up new perspectives on where the organization should be headed. Put simply, this is a must watch if you’re interested in our history.

Also check out my photos of the panel and reception afterwards, and Doc Searls also has some shots as well.

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The National September 11th Memorial Museum Implements CC

Fred Benenson, December 15th, 2008

On Friday December 5th, the National September 11 Memorial & Museum launched its Artists Registry. The registry provides a virtual gallery of art created in response to the attacks of September 11, and includes contributions made by a diverse artistic community using varied media – visual, tactile and auditory. Most excitingly from CC’s perspective is that the registry offers full support of our 6 licenses. When uploading a work artists have the option to select a license and the work’s resulting metadata and RDFa will be displayed when the it is shown in the online galleries.

Not only has National September 11th Memorial Museum encouraged user submissions into its collection, but by using our licenses, it has done so in a progressive and socially responsible fashion. We look forward to seeing more institutions like the Memorial Museum integrating CC into their mission and offerings, so it is great to see such an innovative implementation leading the pack.

Click here to read the museum’s full press release (PDF warning) about the launch, or just head over to the registry to check it out now.

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Arts Engine and CC Team Up for Case Study Video

Fred Benenson, December 15th, 2008

Creative Commons and Arts Engine have teamed up to create a video explaining how CC has helped filmmakers in the Media That Matters film festival.

In this short produced by Intelligent Television, you can hear from established film makers on why CC is a crucial part of their work flow and perspective on creating new media.

Check our video page for full details, downloads, and more.

Also, don’t forget that the Media That Matters Film Festival call for entries is open until January 9th. All finalists will be awarded $1000 for their future film making endeavors.

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Eighth Annual Media That Matters Film Festival DVDs on Sale

Fred Benenson, November 25th, 2008

The Media that Matters 8th Annual Festival DVDs have officially gone on sale. There are a number of facts that make these DVDs exceptional in the festival and documentary world:

If you’re interested in submitting your work to the 9th Annual Media that Matters Film Festival, check out their submission page here. Either way, consider buying a DVD today!

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Guide to Creative Commons Media for Videographers

Cameron Parkins, November 24th, 2008

Eugenia Loli-Queru recently published a Guide to Creative Commons Media for Videographers, providing a great overview of what videographers should look for in CC-licensed media. Lol-Queru gives background on our license conditions (explaining what each one means for videographers in particular), discusses sources for CC-licensed music, and touches on some general practices and marking standards videographers should abide by. It is a solid guide for anyone looking for free and open media to use in online video and something all CC-using videographers would do well to read.

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