Weblog

2009 June

CC Case Studies: What are the latest?

Michelle Thorne, June 16th, 2009

One month in to the revamped CC Case Studies project, and you might be curious to hear how it’s going. For starters, there have been some brilliant new submissions, the most compelling of which will be included in upcoming publications and research. We’re still collecting more user-submitted studies, so hop over to our wiki and add YOUR story!

Here’s a taste of what’s available:

remixhome

UC Berkeley shares with us their open archaeology experiment, Remixing Çatalhöyük. This innovative project interprets archaeological excavations from a 9,000-year-old settlement mound of Çatalhöyük in central Turkey, and it employs Creative Commons licensing to encourage academics and students alike to explore and remix their data sets and multimedia.

UrbanMinistry.org has written to us about a unique case study on how they use Creative Commons licenses to better deliver online faith-based materials and social services to under-resourced communities.

silviao

A submission by Linux Outlaws demonstrates how their freely licensed content created “a vibrant and active community of listeners and fans.” The show’s producers write that the “surprising success of the show would never have been possible without the ability, and explicit encouragement, to share the content freely in every way possible.”

There are of course a number of “classic” CC studies to browse, such as the well-detailed account of the Nine Inch Nails release, The Slip, and the award-winning citizen media platform Global Voices Online. A few people also have begun writing non-English case studies, for example one about Berlin’s CC-music-only bar, Breipott, or the Colombian singer Silvia O.

The CC Case Studies are a growing and community-driven resource. The stories are as powerful as the information that supports them, so we welcome you to take a moment and share with us why YOU use CC and how. The more data you can provide about your work, the better.

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We Have Band: “You Came Out” Video Stills Released Under CC-License

Cameron Parkins, June 15th, 2009

wehaveband
We_Have_Band 1709, we_have_band | CC BY-SA

We Have Band, and electro-pop act from London, recently released a great new video for their single You Came Out in collaboration with creative agency Wieden + Kennedy. The video is stop frame animated and composed of 4,816 still images, all of which are CC BY-SA licensed and available on We Have Band’s flickr page. This allows fans of the band the ability to reanimate the video and reuse the images as long as they attribute We Have Band and share derivative works under the same license.

Find out more about the single at the band’s mysapce blog, including ordering info.

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Night Of The Living Dead: Reanimated

Cameron Parkins, June 15th, 2009

notldr

Night Of The Living Dead: Reanimated is a collaborative project that takes George Romero’s cult horror classic, Night of the Living Dead and very literally reanimates the entire film. Featuring work from a huge number of artists, the project as a whole is being released under a CC BY-NC-ND license with individual artists retaining rights to their contributions. It is well documented that the original film is in the public domain and in that spirit, Mike Schneider – the projects curator – is releasing all of his notes and documentation under a CC BY license so others have a leg-up in making their own iterations of the project.

The project is currently looking for independent venues to screen the film come this fall and is slating a DVD release for the upcoming winter – be sure to contact the project leads for more information. Similarly, they are currently soliciting collaborators for their next project, Unseen Horror.

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Nature’s H1N1 Paper under BY-NC-SA

Fred Benenson, June 15th, 2009

H1N1 Graph from Nature
Nature, the international weekly journal of science just released an advanced version of a paper entitled ‘Origins and evolutionary genomics of the 2009 swine-origin H1N1 influenza A epidemic‘ under our Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike license.

While this is indeed great news in and of itself, you might have noticed that the license notification didn’t quite make it to the early PDF version of the paper. We’re willing to chalk it up to the fact that the paper isn’t in its final version, but we’ll be looking for the CC license badge when that one comes out.

If you’re a publisher releasing CC licensed works, check out high resolution and vector formats of our badges on our downloads page here.

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Picasa Adds CC Search

Fred Benenson, June 12th, 2009

picasa-web-albums-cc-search
Yesterday, Google Blogoscoped picked up on Picasa’s new CC feature: Search! In case it weren’t clear, we get really excited when platforms like Picasa enable CC content exploration. Its one thing to enable your community to select a CC license for their work, but its another thing entirely to help the rest of the web discover that content. Picasa’s commons community will surely benefit from this kind of exposure, so thanks to Picasa for enabling such a valuable feature.

If you’re working on a platform that supports CC, and haven’t considered building a CC-specific license-sensitive search portal, now there’s no excuse!

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Tony Shawcross Explains CC Licensing

Cameron Parkins, June 10th, 2009

Former interviewee and Executive Director at Deproduction Tony Shawcross points us towards a recent video he produced to educate the Deproduction community on how CC licenses work. Focusing primarily on our CC BY-NC-SA license, the video is informative and to the point, acting as a great primer for those who have never heard of CC or need extra help understanding what our licenses do.

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BYU Launches OCW Pilot

Jane Park, June 10th, 2009

It appears that David Wiley’s move to Brigham Young University has already resulted in progress towards opening the university’s content. Long-time pioneer and academic of open education, Wiley reports that BYU’s Independent Study has launched its Open CourseWare (OCW) pilot with six Creative Commons licensed courses under CC BY NC-SA.

“The pilot includes three university-level courses and three high school-level courses (BYU IS offers 250 university-level courses online for credit and another 250 high school-level courses online for credit). The courses in BYU IS OCW are content-complete – that is, they are the full courses as delivered online without the need of additional textbooks or other materials (only graded assessments have been removed).”

The most interesting thing about this pilot is that it “is part of a dissertation study to measure the impact of OCW courses on paying enrollments.” So far, “the results are very positive – 85 of the 3500 people who visited the OCW site last month registered for for-credit courses… if this pattern remains stable, then BYU IS OCW will be financially self-sustainable with the ability to add and update a number of new courses to the collection each year, indefinitely, should they so choose.” Echoing Wiley, that is an exciting prospect. We look forward to seeing these results develop, in addition to other inquiries into the sustainability of general OER initiatives in the future…

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Cologne Commons: Festival for Free Music

Michelle Thorne, June 10th, 2009

industriegitarre1

Cologne Commons - Konferenz und Festival für freie Musikkultur

We’re counting down the days until June 12, when the free music festival Cologne Commons kicks off in Germany’s metropolis on the Rhine. The festival invites netlabels, musicians, and business developers alike to the two-day conference and party in Cologne.

Sessions cover key topics in the free music scene, like mobile music, games, the legal backbone of running a netlabel, and successful case studies and business models for online distribution. And when the sun sets, the festival turns up the lights on new musical talent from across Europe.

Tickets for the June 12-13 event can be booked online, but if you can’t make it in person, follow the action on Twitter or listen to the CC Compilations.

From the Cologne Commons website:

Although netlabels play a central role in this year’s festival, it is by far not limited only to music. More generally the focus is on Creative Commons everything related to art and media – with the rise of a new cultural economy and perspectives for young artists in mind.

Entertainment for the Braindead” by Christopher Pattberg / Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Germany license

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CC in Torino, June 26-30

Mike Linksvayer, June 10th, 2009


Photo by Chensiyuan / CC BY-SA

Two fantastic Creative Commons and related events happening in Turin, Italy late this month, with registration deadlines fast approaching.

June 26 is a one day CC Technology Summit. This is the place to be for learning how CC and others are using the Semantic Web to support open and interoperable rights information, decentralized copyright registries, machine-readable citation, and more. Unintentionally it is also a showcase of the global nature of CC technology innovation, with 13 presenters from 8 countries. The registration price is €75 or €50 for COMMUNIA attendees (see below) and CC Network members and the deadline is June 15. See video and slides from last year’s CC tech summits at Google in Mountain View, California and MIT in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

The Second COMMUNIA International Conference 2009 is scheduled for Sunday 28, Monday 29 & Tuesday 30 June 2009 in Torino, under the title Global Science and the Economics of Knowledge-Sharing Institutions. Among the exciting keynote addresses is John Wilbanks of Science Commons. Registration is €168 and closes June 12. See one of our past posts on COMMUNIA, the European Thematic Network for the Digital Public Domain.

Both events promise compelling, cutting-edge talks, and are also a fantastic opportunity to meet many of the leads of CC jurisdiction projects in Europe. A special mention and thanks must be given to Juan Carlos De Martin, project lead of CC Italy, organizer of COMMUNIA, and Co-director, NEXA Center for Internet & Society, Politecnico of Torino, speaker and host at both events!

I hope to see you in Torino.

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Public (UK) perception of copyright, public sector information, and CC

Mike Linksvayer, June 9th, 2009

The UK Office of Public Sector Information has published a report on public understanding of copyright, in particular Crown Copyright, the default status of UK government works … and Creative Commons. It contains interesting findings, though I really wish it had included two additional questions.

Among the general (UK) public, 71% agree that government should encourage re-use of content it provides, and only 4% disagree.

The survey asked whether people felt encouraged or discouraged from using content when seeing “copyright” alone or alternatives on a web page:

Encouraged Discouraged
Copyright 15% 70%
Crown Copyright 22% 52%
Click-Use Licence 22% 35%
Read Terms & Conditions 61% 29%



Clearly, copyright discourages use. Of the alternative notices tested in this way, only “Read Terms & Conditions” noticeably encourages use. As the presentation notes, this option is likely to be recognized as non-transactional.

Adding a transaction, potentially monetary, as overhead to copy & paste discourages re-use. You’ll occasionally hear us and advocates of open licensing generally talk about reducing “transaction costs” — see, that’s not just blather! One way of looking at public licenses such as CC licenses is that they make re-use non-transactional — they pre-clear at least certain re-uses.

Unfortunately, the survey did not evaluate a CC license notice in the same manner — whether it encourages or discourages use. 87% of the general public did not recognize the license icon associated with the CC Attribution license. It’s hard to say whether this is good or bad — a small proportion recognizes the image — on the other hand we’re talking about the general public and one specific image.

Hopefully this or a similar survey will be repeated in the UK and elsewhere to see how recognition increases, or does not. Furthermore, future surveys should test not mere image recognition. Typically a license icon is paired with a statement such as “This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License.” And of course the icon and text are linked to a “human readable” deed explaining the terms, as well as a “machine readable” annotation so that seeing a license notice on a web page isn’t the only vector for discovering the content as re-usable without a transaction.

Even more unfortunately, they survey did not evaluate whether “public domain” encourages or discourages use.

Overall, it is fantastic that this survey was done and published. Clearly the public wants to be encouraged to make use of its own information and a non-transactional alternative to default copyright is necessary to make that encouragement.

While we’ve come a very long way toward enabling effective sharing and re-framing copyright for the digital age, one must strongly agree with Glyn Moody’s assessment:

It looks like much more work needs to be done to get the message out about Creative Commons and its licences.

You can help — release works under one of the CC licenses (or into the public domain), use and recommend licensed works, and if you’re able, please support the effort financially.

Via Open Education News.

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