Commons News

Illegitimate Offspring

Glenn Otis Brown, August 10th, 2003

Salon has two good stories this weekend on mash-ups (also known, across the pond, as “bastard pop”): 1, 2.

These older Salon stories on the same subject, from 2002 and 1998, provide a couple of nice reference points. If this is all just a trend, it’s a sure and steady one.

Read about Creative Commons’ plans to help make this sort of of culture legitimate, in the law’s eyes at least.

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CNET News.com

Press Robot, August 7th, 2003

Battle of the Blog” by Paul Festa

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Washington Post

Press Robot, August 7th, 2003

Dean Flaunts His Internet Edge as Guest ‘Blogger’” by Jonathan Krim

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Linux Journal

Press Robot, August 7th, 2003

Saving the Net” by Doc Searls

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Harvard Crimson

Press Robot, August 7th, 2003

Harvard to House Blog Standards” by Crimson Staff

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InfoWorld

Press Robot, August 7th, 2003

Atom evolves despite RSS transfer” by Cathleen Moore

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San Jose Mercury News

Press Robot, August 7th, 2003

Supreme Court oral arguments now available for file-swapping” by Phuong Le

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Nothing So Strange Movie

Matt Haughey, August 7th, 2003

This week’s featured content is the open-source film “Nothing So Strange.” While the whole film is protected by full copyright, individual clips can be downloaded for a nominal fee (a few cents in most cases), with the film’s footage available for reuse, remix, and commercial use in any other work provided attribution is given.

It’s an interesting experiment in both filmmaking and micropayments.

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OYEZ Press

Glenn Otis Brown, August 7th, 2003

“Getting audio recordings of landmark legal arguments is becoming as easy as downloading the latest Snoop Dogg single.”

There are two nice pieces on the OYEZ project’s recent release of Supreme Court audio under Creative Commons licenses in the New York Times and AP today, among a few other places.

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Creative Commons & Brazil

Glenn Otis Brown, August 6th, 2003

iCommons has expanded to Brazil. The Fundação Getulio Vargas (FGV) Law School, in Rio de Janeiro, will lead the effort.

FGV and Creative Commons also plan to begin work with the Brazilian Minister of Culture, world-renowned musician Gilberto Gil (!), to use the licenses to expand access to Brazilian culture.

Read the first porting (for readers of Portuguese).

Read the excellent annotation of the first porting (by project lead Ronaldo Lemos, in English).

Join the discussion.

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