PictureSandbox

April’s most sophisticated Flickr/CC mashup yet has relaunched with angel funding as PictureSandbox.com with cool tools to find and reuse CC licensed photos in lightboxes, cards, and more.

Learn computers with pictures

In Pictures has published 22 computer books under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 license. These books cover computer basics with several operating systems, productivity applications and basic web design and programming. These books make maximum use of images. A quote published at DesktopLinux and elsewhere explains: Most computer books contain 50,000 to 100,000 words, but … Read More “Learn computers with pictures”

Sharing a lost city: An innovative collaboration with re:3d and the New Palmyra project

Together with re:3d, an Austin-based 3D printing company, and the #NEWPALMYRA project, a community platform dedicated to the virtual remodeling and creative use of architecture from the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra, Creative Commons has produced a 200 pound, 7.5 feet tall 3D rendering of one of the Palmyra Tetrapylons.

Almanaque Azul: a Panamanian travel guide licensed under CC

Almanaque Azul is a group of Panamanian environmentalists, artists, and explorers that began the process of creating a travel guide for the beaches of the Republic of Panama in 2005 through a blog that chronicled the amazing cultural and natural diversity of various small towns and deserted beaches. Over the years, dozens of volunteers reported … Read More “Almanaque Azul: a Panamanian travel guide licensed under CC”

Copyright Filtering Mechanisms Don’t (and can’t) Respect Fair Use

During Fair Use Week organizations and individuals are publishing blog posts, hosting workshops, and sharing educational resources about the implementation and importance of this essential limitation to the rights endowed by copyright. Fair use (and in other countries, the related “fair dealing”) is a flexible legal tool that permits some uses of copyrighted material without … Read More “Copyright Filtering Mechanisms Don’t (and can’t) Respect Fair Use”