Press Releases

Leaders in Intellectual Property and Open Content from All Corners of the Globe Participating in Inaugural International Creative Commons Conference

Raul, June 24th, 2005

Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA—June 24, 2005

Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization that provides flexible
copyright licenses for authors and artists, is holding a conference
at Harvard Law School over the coming weekend of June 25 and 26,
2005, for all of its international collaboration partners, who are
responsible for the legal ‘porting’ of the Creative Commons
licenses and building community around the licenses.

Representatives from 37 countries in Africa, the Americas, Asia,
Australia, Europe, and the Middle East will be coming together to
discuss a wide range of topics, including the experience of the
Creative Commons’ collaboration partners in ‘porting’ the Creative
Commons licenses in their local jurisdiction and their experience
in terms of the local adoption of the Creative Commons licenses. In
addition, the conference will serve as a forum to discuss global
issues faced by Creative Commons and its collaboration partners
including moral rights and collecting societies.

Creative Commons began its internationalization project in 2003. To
date, Creative Commons licenses are available in 20 different
jurisdictions with another 11 jurisdictions actively in the process
of ‘porting.’ Porting involves translating the licenses
linguistically as well as legally so that the licenses are
customized for the requirements of the specific jurisdiction. In
total, Creative Commons is in talks with representatives from 70
different jurisdictions.

Christiane Asschenfeldt, Executive Director of iCommons, Creative
Commons’ legal porting project, said: “After two years of online
collaboration it will be great for all of us to eventually meet in
person to discuss the issues facing Creative Commons and our
experiences in implementing the licenses.”

Executive Director of Creative Commons’ international community
building project, Paula Le Dieu said: “This event marks the start
of Creative Commons as a truly international organization as it
gathers together for the first time the incredible group of people
that have been responsible for the growth and success of Creative
Commons as a global phenomenon.“

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes
the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether
owned or in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences.
It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the
Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation,
the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit Creative Commons

Contact

  • Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
  • [email protected]
  • Paula Le Dieu (London)
  • [email protected]
  • Press Kit here

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‘Leaders of the Free World’ finally able to sing “Happy Birthday to You” to the Free Culture Movement after rights to song cleared

Raul, June 21st, 2005

San Francisco, USA, June 21, 2005:

Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization that provides flexible
copyright licenses for authors and artists, released today its long-
awaited present to the Free Culture Movement, represented primarily
by FreeCulture.org, which celebrated its first birthday on April 23,
2005. The present is a recording of “Happy Birthday to You” by some
of the ‘leaders of the free world’–meaning some of the leaders in the
free culture, free software and open source software movements. The
present is now offered to the world from Creative Commons’ site in
exchange for donations to pay the licensing fees of 8.5 cents per
download, with the rest of the donations going to support the Free
Culture Movement.

The Free Culture Movement was formed at Swarthmore College,
Swarthmore, PA, by more than 100 students. These students were
organized by a group who sued Diebold and won, after Diebold sent a
cease and desist letter to the Swarthmore university administrator
alleging violations of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Faced
with such grave accusations, the university administrator shut down
the students’ website–that is, until they won the right to have it
reinstated. A year later, there are nine chapters across the country,
and more brewing around the world.

In keeping with tradition, Creative Commons wanted to sing “Happy
Birthday” to the Free Culture Movement and help the Free Culture
Movement on its way with donations by those supportive of its cause.
Because “Happy Birthday” is still under copyright, however, to do so,
Creative Commons needed to get a license.

The American Composers, Authors and Publishers directed Creative
Commons–because it wished to only make a single download–to Warner
Chappell Music. Warner, after discussing license terms and quoting an
applicable license fee, refused to grant a license and directed
Creative Commons to Harry Fox. Finally, through Harry Fox, Creative
Commons was able to obtain a license and sing “Happy Birthday” in
public to the Free Culture Movement, somewhat belatedly given the
delay in securing the necessary rights.

The song is now available for download and donations are welcome to
help cover the licensing fees and to assist the Free Culture Movement
click here. Performing the
song are the designated ‘leaders of the free world’–The Staff of
EFF”, Mitch Kapor, Dan Gillmor, Brian Behlendorf, Ian Clarke, Jimmy
Wales, Brewster Kahle, and Gigi Sohn.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes
the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works–whether owned
or in the public domain–by empowering authors and audiences. It is
sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public
Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the
Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit here

Contact

  • Neeru Paharia
  • Executive Director, Creative Commons
  • neeru at creativecommons.org
  • 415.946.3068

Press Kit here

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openDemocracy’s Global Network of Writers Adopts Creative Commons Licenses

Raul, June 15th, 2005

San Francisco, USA & London, UK – June 14, 2005>

Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization that provides flexible
copyright licenses for authors and artists, and openDemocracy.net, an
independent online magazine for debate about global politics, today unveiled a new
partnership to bring works by the world’s leading scholars and writers into the
global commons.

openDemocracy.net is the first online publisher of its size and caliber to adopt
Creative Commons licensing. Starting today, members of the public will be free to
republish most articles on the openDemocracy.net site in any non-commercial publication in
the world. “This move embodies the democratic values we champion,” says openDemocracy’s
editor Isabel Hilton.

Since 2001 openDemocracy.net has published more than 2,600 articles by
writers from around the world on issues relating to democracy, politics and
culture. Contributors include scholars, journalists, policymakers and
politicians. openDemocracy.net today released the work of 150 existing authors
under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives license. All
future authors will be encouraged to publish their work under this new default
license, although they will also be free to opt for traditional “All rights
reserved” level of copyright, or an even more permissive Creative Commons
license instead.

Chairman & CEO of Creative Commons, Lawrence Lessig, said “It is exciting
that the important content published in openDemocracy will be able
to freely circulate around the globe and assist in spreading the ideas and
arguments of its contributors. Creative Commons is honored that openDemocracy
felt that Creative Commons licenses were suitable for this purpose.”

About openDemocracy.net

openDemocracy was founded in London in 2001. Its authors span the
globe, and include some of the most respected writers and scholars from across
the political spectrum. Past contributors include Todd Gitlin, Mary
Kaldor, Kofi Annan, Anne-Marie Slaughter, John le Carré, Ian McEwan, and Siva
Vaidhyanathan. Visit: opendemocracy

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the
creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or
in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained
by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and
Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.
For general information, visit Creative Commons

Contact

Solana Larsen, openDemocracy New York Editor +1 646 220-1459
[email protected]

Neeru Paharia, Creative Commons Executive Director +1 415 946-3068
[email protected]

Press Kit: here

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Creative Commons and Science Commons Announce Open Access Law Program

Raul, June 6th, 2005

Creative Commons and Science Commons Announce Open Access Law Program

San Francisco & Boston, USA — June 6, 2005

Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization that provides flexible
copyright licenses for authors and artists, and Science Commons, a
project of Creative Commons that works to encourage sharing of
scientific and academic knowledge, today unveiled their Open Access
Law Program. The Program is designed to make legal scholarship
“open access,” that is freely available online to everyone,
without undue copyright and licensing restrictions. The Open Access
Law Program is an initiative of the Science Commons Publishing
Project, which seeks to reduce the legal and logistical effort
involved in managing copyrighted scholarly publications.

As part of their Open Access Law Program, Creative Commons and
Science Commons are working with a large number of law journals to
encourage the open access archiving of the articles that they
publish. Science Commons has created a set of resources to promote
open access in legal publishing, including its Open Access Law
Journal Principles and an Open Access Law Model Publication
Agreement. The Principles and the Agreement encourage open access
to legal scholarship, by encouraging law journals to post their
published articles to the Internet, or allowing authors to do so.
They protect the basic interests of both journal and author by
ensuring that the journal is given a license to use the work, and
is always attributed as the place of first publication. Law
journals can adopt the Open Access Principles or can develop their
own policies consistent with the Principles. Journals can also
adopt the Science Commons Open Access Law Model Publication
Agreement as their standard agreement with all authors. Both
documents are available at the Science Commons’ Open Access Law
webpage

Staff at Science Commons’ offices in Boston worked with program
leads Professor Dan Hunter of the Wharton School, University of
Pennsylvania and Professor Mike Carroll of Villanova Law School,
who serves on the Board of Creative Commons, to produce the
Principles and the Agreement.

Professor Hunter said “Open access to law articles is an idea
whose time has come. All of the players in US scholarly legal
journal publishing have an interest in the widest possible audience
for their material. The authors benefit, the journals benefit, and
law schools benefit. And more importantly, the public benefits.
Everyone walks away a winner.”

Already 21 law reviews have adopted the Open Access Principles, or
have policies that are consistent with them. Leading journals such
as Animal Law, Harvard Journal of Law & Technology, Indiana Law
Journal, Lewis & Clark Law Review, Michigan Law Review, Michigan
State Law Review, New York Law School Law Review, Texas Law Review,
Vanderbilt Law Review, and Wayne Law Review have signed on, as have
all of the journals published by Duke Law School and Villanova Law
School.

Heidi Bond, the Executive Articles Editor of the Michigan Law
Review, one of the first journals to have policies consistent with
the Principles, said “Law reviews do not need to demand ownership
of their author’s manuscripts. We think our publication policies
should contribute to the free exchange of ideas among legal
academics. Open access policies make for happier authors and better
scholarship. After all, law review articles are like software:
they’re best when they’re free for others to learn from and build
on.”

Creative Commons became involved in supporting open access to law
scholarship through Professor Lawrence Lessig, Stanford Law
professor and Chair of Creative Commons. In March this year he
signed away his copyright in an article to a law review and vowed
never to do it again. He has since thrown his weight behind efforts
to make legal scholarship open to all. Professor Lessig said “When
I drew my line in the sand, I knew of only one journal that was
open access. Today there are at least 21. I’m not sure that more
law review articles by me is a benefit to society, but at least
there are journals where I can publish and know that everyone can
read my work online, for free.”

Professor Lessig is the first signatory on the Open Access Law
Author Pledge, where law professors can agree to support open
access principles. This support includes encouraging journals to
become open access and promising to publish only in journals that
are open access.

Through its Open Access Law Program, Science Commons will work with
law schools, authors, libraries and journals to encourage open
access to legal journals and articles, and plans to expand the
Program into other areas of law publishing. Although the program’s
initial focus is on legal publishing in the United States, Science
Commons is also supporting international efforts to make legal
material freely available to all.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes
the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether
owned or in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences.
It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the
Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation,
the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit here

About Science Commons

Science Commons is a project of the nonprofit corporation Creative
Commons that works to ease unnecessary legal and logistical
barriers to the flow of scientific and academic knowledge. It was
launched in 2005 with the generous support of the HighQ Foundation
and Creative Commons. Science Commons is housed at and receives
generous support from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
where Science Commons shares space, staff, and inspiration with the
Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.

For general information, visit Science Commons

Contact

  • Dan Hunter
  • Assistant Professor of Legal Studies, Wharton School, University of
  • [email protected]
  • John Wilbanks
  • Executive Director, Science Commons
  • [email protected]

Press Kit

here

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CREATIVE COMMONS COPYRIGHT LICENSES LAUNCH IN SOUTH AFRICA

Raul, June 2nd, 2005

San Francisco, USA, and Johannesburg, SOUTH AFRICA, June 1, 2005 –
Creative Commons, a non-profit organization that offers free copyright
licenses and tools to creators to make their works available on more
flexible terms, unveiled a localized version of its innovative
licensing system in South Africa last week.

With South Africa offering Creative Commons licenses tailored for the
specifics of the legal system in South Africa, Creative Commons
licenses and tools are now available a total of 18 jurisdictions. The
organization already provides copyright licenses specific to
Australian, Austrian, Brazilian, Belgian, Canadian, Croatian, Dutch,
English & Welsh, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Polish,
U.S., Taiwanese and Spanish law, thanks to a global network of
artists, lawyers, and technologists.

Staff at Creative Common’s offices in San Francisco and Berlin worked
with Project Leads Heather Ford and Andrew Rens as well as the LINK
Centre at the University of Witwatersrand to adapt the standardized
licenses for use in South Africa. Heather Ford is a former Reuters’
fellow at Stanford Law School and the director of the Creative Commons
South Africa project. Heather has already built an energetic creative
community in South Africa around the Creative Commons licenses.
Andrew Rens is a South African attorney, who previously taught both
intellectual property and information and communications technology
law at the University of the Witwatersrand, and led the license
drafting process.

The launch of the South African Creative Commons licenses occurred in
conjunction with a conference sponsored by the LINK Centre entitled
“Commons Sense: Towards an African Digital Information Commons.”
Project leads from Creative Commons Brazil, Ronaldo Lemos, and
Creative Commons India, Lawrence Liang, presented on the topic of
“Open Content for the Developing World.” Creative Commons CEO &
Chairman, Lawrence Lessig also presented at the conference on the
topic of the “Global Momentum towards the Commons.”

“South Africa, along with Brazil, will prove to be the one of the most
important opportunities for the spread of Creative Commons,” said
Lawrence Lessig of the South African launch, “Already the energy and
awareness is far beyond anything we could have expected.”

About the LINK Centre:

The LINK Centre is the leading research and training body in the field
of information and communications technology (ICT) policy, regulation
and management in Southern Africa.

LINK focuses on capacity building in the public sector and development
arenas through quality training, applied research and consultancy
services necessary to maximize the benefits of the Information Society
and the Knowledge Economy. In addition to hosting the South African
chapter of Creative Commons, LINK is a founding partner in Research
ICT Africa!
For general information, visit here

For information about Creative Commons, South Africa, visit
here

About Creative Commons:

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the
creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works — whether owned or
in the public domain — by empowering authors and audiences. It is
sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain,
the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network
Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit Creative Commons

Contacts:

  • Andrew Rens (San Francisco)
  • Legal Lead
  • Creative Commons, South Africa
  • [email protected]
  • Heather Ford (Johannesburg)
  • Director
  • Creative Commons, South Africa
  • [email protected]
  • Neeru Paharia (San Francisco)
  • Executive Director
  • Creative Commons
  • [email protected]
  • Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
  • Executive Director
  • iCommons
  • [email protected]

Press Kit here

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Creative Commons Content Sought for Innovative New Pilot of Mobile Television in Finland

Raul, May 26th, 2005

San Francisco, USA, and Helsinki, Finland – May 19, 2005 – Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization dedicated to building a body of creative works free to share and build upon, announced today that Creative Commons licensed content is being sought as part of a pilot of an innovative new content service – mobile television.

The pilot is being conducted in Finland, a country renowned for its leading mobile technology innovation. Several Finnish companies, including Nokia and Elisa Oyj are participating in the trial with the support of Finnish authorities. The trial pilots IP Datacasting over DVB-H, which uses mobile broadcasting technology to deliver TV-like services to mobile devices. The aim of the pilot is to test mobile TV services and consumer experiences, as well as the underlying technology, with 500 users in the Helsinki capital region.

As part of the pilot, the Finnish experimental mobile television channel IndicaTV is seeking Creative Commons’ licensed video content. Initially, IndicaTV will be linking to Creative Commons licensed content that is submitted at an Internet archive site. From June 1, 2005, IndiciaTV will then select content that is submitted to the site and is of a high quality and suitable for the small screen, for broadcast via its mobile TV service. The pilot will run until June 20, 2005.

“The Nokia platform could inspire a different kind of television.” said Stanford Law Professor and Creative Commons Chairman Lawrence Lessig. “The Web is filled with content producers who are willing to share their work with the world. Creative Commons provides the tools to let people know it.”

Jonas Kronlund, project manager and representative of Elisa, one of the companies participating in the trial, explained the advantages of using Creative Commons licensed content on mobile television: “We are exited about using Creative Commons content because of the flexibility offered by Creative Commons licenses. People can instantaneously download Creative Commons licensed programs to their phone after they see it on mobile TV and share that content with their friends legally.”

Justin Cone, who created the winning entry “Building on Past” to
Creative Commons’ Moving Image contest, has already submitted his video to be used in the pilot. The Moving Image contest was held by Creative Commons in 2003 and invited people to remix content to produce a 2-minute video that explained Creative Commons’ mission. “Building on the Past” is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial license.

Creators who have applied a Creative Commons license to their video or those who are interested in doing so in order to participate in the pilot can find more information about how to submit their content here

About the Mobile Television Pilot
On 8 March 2005, Digita, Elisa, MTV, Nelonen, Nokia, TeliaSonera and YLE (the Finnish Broadcasting Company) started a unique mobile TV pilot in Finland.

Selected from TeliaSonera and Elisa mobile phone customers, the test users are able to view real-time TV and radio programs on a Nokia 7710 smartphone equipped with a special accessory to receive mobile TV broadcasts. The Nokia smartphone also enables direct links to the Internet for access to background information on TV programs or sports results. Test users have access to MTV, YLE and Nelonen programs as well as international theme channels such as CNN, BBC World, Euronews, Eurosport, ViVa Plus and Fashion TV. The pilot continues until 20 June 2005.

Elisa and TeliaSonera are responsible for customer service, invoicing and connections to the new interactive supplementary services. Digita has designed and built the digital TV network needed for the distribution of mobile TV services and will manage the network, while Nokia will develop the mobile TV service management and smartphones that can receive mobile TV broadcasts.

For more information about the pilot, visit
this page.

About Elisa
Elisa is a provider of a variety of telecommunication services
including versatile voice and data services, connections to the
Internet and content services, telephony solutions, customized
communication and ICT solutions, international communication solutions
and network operator services. Elisa is one of the pioneer companies
in mobile communication. In 1991 the world’s first GSM phone call was made on Elisa’s network.

  • Contact
  • Jonas Kronlund (Helsinki)
  • Project Manager
  • [email protected]

About Creative Commons
A non-profit founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative
re-use of intellectual and artistic works – whether owned or in the
public domain – by empowering artists and audiences. It is sustained
by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John
D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund and
the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit
Creative Commons

  • Contact
  • Neeru Paharia (San Francisco)
  • Executive Director, Creative Commons
  • [email protected]
  • Herkko Hietanen (San Francisco)
  • Creative Commons Finland Project Lead
  • [email protected]
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Creative Commons and Magnatune Announce Lisa DeBenedictis Remix Contest -– Winners to Receive Magnatune Recording Contract

Mia Garlick, May 24th, 2005

Be creative, be open, and give it your best shot. “Let your imagination run wild and get creative,” is the slogan from Magnatune and Creative Commons on their latest venture. Online record label Magnatune and non-profit creative licensing organization Creative Commons announce that they will co-host a digital music remix contest beginning in May of 2005 and will begin accepting entries on June 15, 2005. The contest will be hosted at ccMixter and features the music of Magnatune rock artist Lisa DeBenedictis, who will voluntarily have her work sliced, diced and mixed by contestants. Music samples and contest rules are currently posted at ccMixter, which will begin accepting remix submissions as of May 13, 2005. Among the prizes for the remix contest is the opportunity for the winner to appear on the Lisa DeBenedictis Remix Compilation album and be eligible for an assortment of cash prizes.

“Remixed music is an exciting new kind of musical art form emerging in the open environment of internet file sharing,” said Magnatune founder and CEO, John Buckman. “Anyone with a creative urge can take existing music tracks and change them into something completely new and different. “This kind of event helps artists to stretch their limits and gain access to a wider variety of great music” explained Magnatune founder and CEO, John Buckman “ and we expect some really fantastic remix arrangements to come out of the contest.”

Contest entrants will have the opportunity to use Magnatune music to create their own remix compositions and submit their best works. Music samples will be posted on the CCMixter Web site beginning in mid-May. The contest will officially open on May 16 and will begin accepting entries, through July 31, 2005. More details regarding contest rules are available at ccMixter.

Lisa DeBenedictis is one of Magnatune’s more than 175 artists who enjoys 50-50 profit splitting and full rights to her music. A “one-woman operation,” she plays a variety of instruments including piano, guitar, keyboard, violin, oboe and mandolin. DeBenedictis is the sole writer, performer and producer of all her music. Her songs have been described as ethereal, fresh and original, earning her the comparisons other well-known female soloists including Tori Amos and Sarah McLachlan. Prior to going solo, DeBenedictis performed in a rock duo called “Ring of Nine” and California Avant Rock duo “DirtyDirtyRockStar.” In addition to writing songs, Lisa composes instrumental music for film.

The concept of “open source” file-sharing originated in the computer software world, and has moved into music. Individual tracks, a drum or bass line within a recording, can be taken and remixed with other tracks to create a completely new composition. Other musicians can then modify, improve or add to the “source” without worrying about obtaining permission from the original artists. Unlike other illegal music remix contests where an artist’s work has been taken and sold without the artist’s permission, Magnatune and Creative Commons have partnered with Lisa DeBenedictis for this effort. Contest participants will be allowed to freely copy selected Magnatune music to produce their works.

Fellow Magnatune recording artist and CC Mixter contest manager Victor Stone, of the group “Four Stones,” has been remixing music for several years. “It is incredibly fun and inspiring to be able to use the best music and make it your own,” said Stone. “It makes remixing a natural extension of what composers have been doing for thousands of years.”

Producers often work for months to build their multi-layered remix compositions. Remix tracks can be highly sophisticated with limitless musical sound samples and layers.

Magnatune music is available for sharing through use of Creative Commons licensing. The Creative Commons license allows for free sharing and building upon existing works, be it musical, written, or images. “We have been using the Creative Commons copyright licensing very successfully,” reports Magnatune’s founder and CEO,said John Buckman. “Through open-source licensing we are able to offer a fair deal to our customers and musicians.” Unusual in the music industry, Magnatune splits profits from album sales with the artists and allows them to keep the rights to their music.

About Creative Commons
A nonprofit founded in early 2002, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network, and the Hewlett Foundation. For more information, visit Creative Commons’ website or contact Neeru Paharia at [email protected]

About Magnatune
Founded in 2003, Magnatune is an independent, online record label that hand selects its own artists, sells its catalog of music through online downloads and print-on-demand CDs and licenses music for commercial and non-commercial use. Based on the principle that “we are not evil,” the company offers fair-trade music to consumers by equally sharing all revenue from the sale of albums with artists and allowing artists to retain full rights to their music. All music can be previewed free of charge with a “try before you buy” philosophy. Customers can also choose how much they want to pay for the music with pricing ranging from $5-18 for a downloadable album or print-on-demand CD. Magnatune is a music business where everybody wins. For further information, please visit the Magnatune website or contact Teresa Malango at [email protected] or 510.289.3781.

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OPEN COPYRIGHT LICENSES OFFERED IN AUSTRALIA

Mia Garlick, May 19th, 2005

Creative Commons and the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) introduce innovative copyright licenses to Australia

San Francisco, USA and Brisbane, AUSTRALIA  Jan. 19, 2005  Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization that offers a flexible copyright for creative work, today unveiled a localized version of its innovative licensing system in Australia. The Creative Commons licenses afford authors and publishers an intermediate degree of protection over their photos, music, text, films, and educational materials under a “some rights reserved” copyright, in contrast to the traditional “all rights reserved.”

With the announcement, Creative Commons now offers free legal tools in a total of fifteen country-specific versions. The organization already provides copyright licenses specific to Austrian, Belgian, Brazilian, Croatian, Dutch, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, U.S., Taiwanese, Canadian, and Spanish law, thanks to a global network of artists, lawyers, and technologists.

Staff at Creative Commons’s offices in San Francisco and Berlin worked with project lead Professor Brian Fitzgerald of the Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Australia, to adapt the standardized licenses for use under Australian law.

Professor Fitzgerald, an internationally recognized expert in intellectual property and technology law, said, “Normally to use other people’s copyright you have to go through a time-consuming process to negotiate your legal rights. What we aim to do with Creative Commons is to be able to license or negotiate those rights through a website with the click of a mouse.”

Creative Commons released the new legal tools, which are available free of charge from the Creative Commons website, at a conference at the QUT today. Lawrence Lessig, professor of law at Stanford University and chairman of Creative Commons, delivered a public lecture on open content licencing at the conference.

“It’s wonderful to see this organization become truly global,” said Neeru Paharia, Assistant Director of Creative Commons, who is visiting Brisbane for the launch. “We hope to localize the Creative Commons licences to other countries of the Asia-Pacific region very soon.”

The worldwide expansion of the Creative Commons is one of the main priorities of the San Francisco-based organization for 2005.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain, by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit the Creative Commons website

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt(Berlin)
iCommons Director
Creative Commons
[email protected]

Neeru Pahari(San Francisco)
Executive Director
Creative Commons
[email protected]

Press Kit

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OPEN COPYRIGHT LICENSES OFFERED IN CROATIA

Mia Garlick, May 19th, 2005

Creative Commons introduces its innovative copyright licenses at the Free Culture Festival in Zagreb

San Francisco, USA and Zagreb, CROATIA  Jan. 19, 2005  Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization that provides a flexible copyright for authors and artists, this week unveiled a localized version of its innovative licensing system in Croatia. The Creative Commons licenses afford authors and publishers an intermediate degree of protection over their photos, music, text, films, and educational materials under a “some rights reserved” copyright, in contrast to the traditional “all rights reserved.”

With the announcement, Creative Commons now offers free legal tools in a total of fourteen country-specific versions. The organization already provides copyright licenses specific to Austrian, Belgian, Brazilian, Dutch, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, U.S., Taiwanese, Canadian and Spanish law, thanks to a global network of artists, lawyers, and technologists.

Staff at Creative Commons’s offices in San Francisco and Berlin worked with project leads Tomislav Medak and Diane Kovaeeviae Remenariae of the Multimedia Institute (mi2), Zagreb, to adapt the standardized licenses for use under Croatian law.

Medak said, “In Croatia there was a powerful grass-roots free culture movement even before we started transposing the licenses into Croatian law. We hope to be able to build on the festival’s momentum to promote rapid license uptake.”

Creative Commons released the new legal tools, which are available free of charge from the Creative Commons website, at the Free Culture Festival in Zagreb, which featured an exhibition, various lectures, and a two-day concert that brought together representatives of the burgeoning local music scene and British artists from Loca Records. Lawrence Lessig, professor of law at Stanford University and chairman of Creative Commons, delivered a keynote speech at the festival.

“Many thanks to Diane and Tomislav for their terrific work,” says Glenn Otis Brown, Executive Director of Creative Commons. “The organization’s tremendous international growth is due entirely to our network of top-notch experts and volunteers worldwide. ”

The continued global expansion of Creative Commons is one of the main priorities of the San Francisco-based organization for 2005.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works, whether owned or in the public domain, by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit the Creative Commons website

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
iCommons Coordinator
Creative Commons

Glenn Otis Brown (San Francisco)
Executive Director
Creative Commons

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CREATIVE COMMONS COPYRIGHT TOOLS NOW AVAILABLE IN SOUTH KOREA

Mia Garlick, May 19th, 2005

The Silicon Valley nonprofit releases South Korean versions of its innovative copyright licenses at the High Court in Seoul.

San Francisco, USA and Seoul, SOUTH KOREA, March 21, 2005 – Creative Commons, a non-profit organization that offers free, flexible copyright tools to the general public, today unveiled a localized version of its innovative licensing system in South Korea. The Creative Commons licenses are available (free of charge) from the group’s website http://www.creativecommons.org. – affording authors and publishers an intermediate degree of protection over their photos, music, text, films, and educational materials under a “some rights reserved” copyright, in contrast to the traditional “all rights reserved.”

With South Korea being the latest country to join its international effort, Creative Commons now offers free legal tools in a total of 15 country-specific versions. The organization already provides copyright licenses specific to Australian, Austrian, Brazilian, Belgian, Croatian, Dutch, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, U.S., Taiwanese, Canadian, and Spanish law, thanks to a global network of artists, lawyers, and technologists.

Staff at Creative Common’s offices in San Francisco and Berlin worked with Professor Suk-Ho Bang of Hongik University, Seoul and project lead Professor Dae-Hee Lee of the Inha Law School and the Korea Association for Info-Media Law (KAFIL) as Affiliate Institution to adapt the standardized licenses for use under Korean law.

“We are very happy to make Creative Commons a reality for artists, lawyers and Internet users here in South Korea”, says Professor Suk-Ho Bang. Professor Suk-Ho Bang and his team worked together with Judge Jongsoo Yoon to release the Creative Commons licenses in South Korea.

The Creative Commons South Korean licenses were launched at an official function at the South Korean High Court in Seoul. Chairman of the Creative Commons Board, Professor Lawrence Lessig, presented at the function and also discussed Creative Commons with judges from the South Korean High Court.

The ongoing global expansion of the Creative Commons project is one of the main priorities of the San Francisco-based organization this year.

About Korea Association for Info-Media Law (KAFIL)

KAFIL was found in 1996 by distinguished leadership of Judge Chan-Hyun Hwang. KAFIL focuses on information law issues. KAFIL is a unique organization in part because of its member composition. The majority of regular members are judges and public prosecutors and thus, it is situated as the leading law association in Korea, bridging academicians and legal professionals. KAFIL holds an annual symposium around June and three academic seminars at other times during the year. In addition, KAFIL hosts bimonthly case study workshops that enable debates among legal professionals on topical issues. KAFIL also published its own law journal on biannual basis.

For general information, visit KAFIL’s website

For information about iCommons Korea, visit Creative Commons Korea Project site

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works — whether owned or in the public domain — by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit the Creative Commons website

Contacts

Professor Suk-Ho Bang (Seoul)
Inha Law School
[email protected]

Neeru Paharia (San Francisco)
Creative Commons
[email protected]

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
iCommons
[email protected]

Press Kit

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