Press Releases

David Byrne and Gilberto Gil in Concert at the Town Hall to Benefit Creative Commons

Matt Haughey, September 15th, 2004

Acclaimed musician and artist David Byrne will take the stage with Gilberto Gil, Brazil’s Minister of Culture and pop music legend, at The Town Hall in New York City on September 21st. Byrne and Gil, performing together for the first time, are uniting for a concert presented by WIRED Magazine to benefit Creative Commons, an innovative nonprofit that offers a new approach to creativity and copyright in the digital age ae an approach that respects authors’ rights both to control their work and share it on their own terms. Building on the “all rights reserved” of traditional copyright, Creative Commons has designed a voluntary system of “some rights reserved” protection.

“The understandable legal battle over music file sharing is strangling the creative potential of the Internet,” said Lawrence Lessig, Chair of Creative Commons and WIRED Magazine columnist. “While we should respect the rights of artists who don’t want their work used without permission, we should also make it easier for artists to mark their works with the freedoms they want it to carry, so that other creators can spread their creativity. The support of WIRED and artists such as David Byrne and Gilberto Gil will help us focus attention on this extraordinary opportunity, and encourage other artists to participate.”

Launched in 2002, Creative Commons provides two principal services, both free of charge. First, Creative Commons offers legal tools that help authors and artists explicitly permit certain uses of their work. A photographer might invite noncommercial sharing of an image of the Eiffel Tower, for example. Second, using a unique Web search technology, it helps other people find such artists and their work. For example, a documentary filmmaker might search Creative Commons for “all photographs of the Eiffel Tower free for noncommercial use,” and locate content posted anywhere on the Web meeting those criteria. Together, these tools help free the creative process from unnecessary legal friction and doubt.

“Until now the music industry has had to choose between two poor legal extremes: enforcing restrictive copyright protection or tolerating piracy,” said Chris Anderson, Editor in Chief of WIRED Magazine. “The great underexplored middle ground between them is “some rights reserved”, which reflects today’s real-world relationship between artists and consumers, where file sharing can be good marketing and sampling an homage. Many artists recognize this and simply lack an easy legal way to expressly permit it and decriminalize their fans. Creative Commons aims to provide that, and in doing so offers an important step towards an intellectual property rights framework for the 21st century.”

Concert Details
Who: David Byrne (www.davidbyrne.com) and Gilberto Gil (www.gilbertogil.com.br)
What: WIRED presents the Creative Commons benefit concert
When: Tuesday, September 21, 2004 | 8:00 p.m. EST
Where: The Town Hall, New York City [123 West 43rd Street, btw. 6/7th Avenues]
Tickets: Available at Ticketmaster (513) 562-4949 or online via www.ticketmaster.com
Also available at the Town Hall Box Office, www.the-townhall-nyc.org
Orchestra and loge seating tickets are $75.00; Balcony seats are $45.00-$55.00
LIVE Webcast:

The event will be Webcast LIVE 8-11 p.m. EST September 21 via a custom-skinned QuickTime player featuring live audio streamed in high-quality MPEG4/AAC audio, along with a slideshow of photos that will be shot and published via the player as the event occurs. QuickTime player will be available on www.creativecommons.org starting Wednesday, September 15.

About WIRED Magazine

WIRED is a monthly magazine that chronicles the people, companies, technologies, and ideas that are transforming the world around us. Each month, WIRED delivers a glimpse into the future of business, science, entertainment, education, culture, and politics.

Press Contacts: TJ Snyder Devon McMahon
PR21 for WIRED PR21 for WIRED
415-369-8118 415-369-8110
tj.snyder@pr21.com devon.mcmahon@pr21.com

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Creative Commons Applauds the Release of Political Film Footage on Peer-to-Peer

Matt Haughey, September 15th, 2004

Open copyright licensing of interviews from the controversial documentary Outfoxed prompts the nonprofit to invite political speakers of all stripes to share their expression during Campaign 2004

Los Angeles and San Francisco, USA – Robert Greenwald, director and producer of the documentary Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch’s War on Journalism, announced today the release of the film’s original footage under a Creative Commons “some rights reserved” copyright license.

The film, which has drawn attention for its pointed critique of Fox News, consists largely of interviews with former Fox employees and news guests. Under the Creative Commons Sampling Plus license, these interviews can now be shared legally on P2P networks or publicly performed for noncommercial purposes. Greenwald has even invited viewers to transform or re-edit his original footage or use it in their own films under the terms of the license. Footage from another Greenwald documentary, Uncovered: The War on Iraq, will also be available soon, Greenwald said.

“In making Outfoxed and Uncovered, I learned how cumbersome and expensive it can be to license footage from news organizations. Creative Commons licenses allow me as a filmmaker to know immediately how I can use a piece of content in my films,” said Greenwald. “I could think of no better way to walk the talk myself than by releasing the interviews from Outfoxed and Uncovered under a license that allows other filmmakers to use my material in new and creative ways. I look forward to seeing what others do with these interviews.”

Greenwald’s announcement prompted Creative Commons, a nonpartisan 501(c)(3) nonprofit dedicated to the legal sharing and re-use of creative works, to call upon authors and artists across the political spectrum to follow suit during this election season.

“We’d be delighted to see other films and footage ( liberal or conservative, favorable towards or critical of any media outlet or public policy ( free to share under Creative Commons licenses,” said Glenn Otis Brown, executive director of Creative Commons. “Political speech is meant to be heard far and wide. Whether in the form of campaign pamphlet, polemical movie, or protest song, core expression is perfectly suited to sharing online.”

The interviews from Outfoxed are now available for free download from the Internet Archive (http://archive.org) via Torrentocracy (http://torrentocracy.com), a cutting-edge tool combining BitTorrent, RSS, and traditional broadcast technologies.

Since its release in theaters and on DVD last month, Outfoxed has remained on Amazon.com’s top ten best-seller list.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation launched in late 2002, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works-whether owned or in the public domain-by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

About Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch’s War on Journalism

Outfoxed “examines how media empires, led by Rupert Murdoch’s Fox News, have been running a ‘race to the bottom’ in television news. This film provides
an in-depth look at Fox News and the dangers of ever-enlarging corporations
taking control of the public’s right to know.”

Outfoxed has sold over 100,000 DVDs since it’s release online in July and is currently in theaters nationwide.

For more information, visit http://outfoxed.org/.

About Uncovered: The War on Iraq

In his documentary feature, Uncovered: The War on Iraq, filmmaker Robert Greenwald “chronicles the Bush Administration’s determined quest to invade Iraq following the events of September 11, 2001. The film deconstructs the administration’s case for war through interviews with U.S intelligence and defense officials.”

For more information, visit http://www.truthuncovered.com.

About the Internet Archive

The Internet Archive is a 501(c)(3) public nonprofit that was founded to build an “Internet library,” with the purpose of offering permanent access for researchers, historians, and scholars to historical collections that exist in digital format. Founded in 1996 and located in the Presidio of San Francisco, the Archive has been receiving data donations from Alexa Internet and others. In late 1999, the organization started to grow to build more well rounded collections, like its Open Source Music and Open Source Movies catalogs.

For more information, visit http://archive.org.

About Torrentocracy

Torrentocracy (pronounced like the word “democracy”) “is a combination of RSS, BitTorrent, your television, and your remote control. In effect, it gives any properly motivated person or entity the ability to have their own TV station. By running Torrentocracy on a computer connected to your television, you not only become a viewer of any available content from the internet, but you also become a part of a vast grass roots media distribution network. This is not about the illegal distribution of media, but rather, about enabling an entirely new way to receive the video which you watch on your TV.”

For more information, visit http://torrentocracy.com.

Contact

Glenn Otis Brown
Executive Director
Creative Commons
glenn@creativecommons.org
1-415-946-3065

Jim Gilliam
Co-Producer
Outfoxed
jim@gilliam.com
1-310-562-2383

Stewart Cheifet
Director of Collections
Internet Archive
stewart@archive.org
1-415-561-6767

Gary Lerhaupt
Torrentocracy.com
gary@lerhaupt.com

Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/presskit/

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Developing Nations Copyright License Frees Creativity Across the Digital Divide

Matt Haughey, September 13th, 2004

The law-and-technology nonprofit Creative Commons offers a tool for authors and publishers to encourage innovation in developing nations while protecting their rights in the developed world.

Geneva, Switzerland, and San Francisco, USA – Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative and educational materials free to share and re-use, unveiled today its Developing Nations copyright license. Creative Commons chairman Lawrence Lessig and Developing Nations license architect Jamie Love announced the new license at the Trans Atlantic Consumer Dialogue’s workshop on “The Future of WIPO,” in Geneva.

Like all of Creative Commons’ legal tools, the Developing Nations license is free of charge and allows authors and artists to invite certain uses of their work, upon certain conditions — to declare “some rights reserved” as opposed to the “all rights reserved” of traditional copyright.

Specifically, the Developing Nations license allows copyright holders to invite a wide range of royalty-free uses of their work in developing nations while retaining their full copyright in the developed world.

“The Developing Nations license allows, for the first time, any copyright holder in the world to participate first-hand in reforming global information policy,” said Lessig. “The fact is that most of the world’s population is simply priced out of developed nations’ publishing output. To authors, that means an untapped readership. To economists, it means ‘deadweight loss.’ To human rights advocates and educators, it is a tragedy. The Developing Nations license is designed to address all three concerns.”

The license was designed by Jamie Love, an expert on intellectual property and development, in cooperation with attorneys at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich and Rosati, in Silicon Valley, and other experts on intellectual property and development.

“The new license makes it easier to expand access to knowledge and support development. It is a tool to make the resource-poor information-rich,” said Jamie Love.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works-whether owned or in the public domain-by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

To learn more about the Developing Nations license,
see http://creativecommons.org/license/devnations.

Contact

Glenn Otis Brown (San Francisco)
Executive Director
Creative Commons
glenn@creativecommons.org
1-415-336-1433

Jamie Love (Washington, D.C.)
The Consumer Project on Technology
james.love@cptech.org

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
International Commons Director
Creative Commons
christiane@creativecommons.org

Press Kit
http://creativecommons.org/presskit/

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Free Online Music Booms as SoundClick Offers Creative Commons Licenses

Matt Haughey, August 11th, 2004

Online music community sees over 30,000 songs licensed under “some rights reserved” copyright in just one month.

San Francisco, CA and New York, NY, USA – Soundclick (http://www.soundclick.com), one of the Internet’s largest music community sites, now offers Creative Commons licenses as an option for all songs uploaded to its website. Soundclick, which sees about 70,000 song uploads per month, soft-launched the Creative Commons license option one month ago. In that time, bands and artists on Soundclick have licensed over 30,000 songs, demonstrating a huge demand from musicians to declare “some rights reserved.”

A list of licensed tracks can be found at http://www.soundclick.com/genres/cc_license.cfm.

The copyright licenses, provided free by the nonprofit Creative Commons, permit fans not only to download music files, but also to copy and share them. In return, musicians who license their songs require attribution (credit as author) and can specify several conditions, including whether to allow remixes, mash-ups, or commercial uses.

The licenses allow artists to harness the power of the Net for maximum promotion while retaining certain rights to their work — while signaling clearly to fans what they can and can’t do.

“Soundclick’s move to offer Creative Commons Licenses is a huge step for the world of independent music,” said Neeru Paharia, Assistant Director of Creative Commons. “The rapid uptake of the licenses proves that there is a huge demand from artists to clarify how they want their work shared or re-used on the Net. Soundclick has made an enormous impact on the amount of music that’s available for people to share and re-use.”

“Opening the licensing process offers new dimensions for musicians,” said Turhan Canli, Chief Executive Officer of Soundclick. “The system developed by Creative Commons is easy to use and understand, even for people who have never considered licensing their music. Musicians on SoundClick are enthusiastic that they can share their songs this way. Being able to legally remix or re-use songs is an exciting and innovative option that clearly helps the whole music community. The fact that within one month more than 30,000 licenses were issued on SoundClick speaks volumes. It’s what musicians have been waiting for.”

Thanks to the rapid rate of adoption at Soundclick and other similar sites, Creative Commons has created the largest pool of openly-licensed music on the Internet. Most of the music can be legally traded on file-sharing networks, and much can be used as source material for remixes, mash-ups, or even synched to video, as long as the conditions of the license are followed. Given the recent proliferation of inexpensive media authoring applications, such as Apple’s GarageBand and Adobe’s Audition, much of this licensed music becomes valuable free source material from which to build new works.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works-whether owned or in the public domain-by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

About Soundclick

Launched in 1997, SoundClick Inc. is a privately funded company. Incorporated in 1999 in California, SoundClick has become one of the largest music communities on the Internet. More than 70,000 new songs and 7,000 new bands are added each month, making it the fastest growing music community. SoundClick features artist pages, unlimited song uploads, CD sales, message boards, charts, and several premium services. All standard services for artists and listeners are free-of-charge.

More information can be found at http://www.soundclick.com.

Contact

Neeru Paharia
Assistant Director, Creative Commons
neeru@creativecommons.org
+1.415.946.3068

Turhan Canli
CEO, SoundClick Inc
Press@soundclick.com

Press Kit
http://creativecommons.org/presskit/

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Creative Commons German Licenses Now Available

Matt Haughey, June 11th, 2004

Creative Commons, a non-profit organization seeking to promote the
sharing of high-quality content, today introduced its highly innovative
licensing system for copyrighted material to Germany.

Palo Alto, USA, and Berlin, GERMANY. Creative Commons, a non-profit
organization seeking to promote the sharing of high-quality content,
today introduced its highly innovative licensing system for copyrighted
digital material to Germany. The Creative Commons licenses, which are
already widely used in the United States, Brazil, Japan, and Finland by
authors, composers and other artists to share their work with others,
were transposed into German law by a team of professional lawyers and
legal academics. Creative Commons staff of the organization’s two offices
in Palo Alto and Berlin collaborated with the ifrOSS institute and
Professor Dreier from the University of Karlsruhe (TH) on the project.

“The launch of the German licenses is a momentous step towards creating a
new and truly global layer of reasonable copyright law,” points out
Lawrence Lessig, chairman of Creative Commons and professor at Stanford
University Law School, who is currently delivering a series of lectures
on intellectual property rights at the WOS 3 Conference in Berlin, the
Wissenschaftskolleg, Grunewald, and the European Commission in Brussels.

After launches in Japan and Brazil earlier this year, Germany and Finland
are the first jurisdictions in the European Union (EU) in which the
Creative Commons licensing-system (proclaiming “some rights reserved”
instead of “all rights reserved”) is available in local language
versions.

By adding Germany and Finland to the available range of jurisdictions
Creative Commons’s international expansion progresses at an accelerated
pace. “We look forward to being able to offer local language licenses to
all European users in the near future,” says Christiane Asschenfeldt, the
iCommons Coordinator, based in Berlin. “Our project leads around the
world — almost all volunteers — display a great sense of enthusiasm and
devotion to our dream of recreating a healthy public domain.”

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative reuse of
intellectual works — whether owned or in the public domain. It is
sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain,
the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett
Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it
shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for
Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org/.

For our press kit, visit http://creativecommons.org/presskit/.

To learn more about Creative Commons’ international efforts, visit
http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons
christiane at creativecommons.org

Glenn Otis Brown (Palo Alto)
Executive Director, Creative Commons
glenn at creativecommons.org

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DMusic Offers Creative Commons Licenses to its User Base Of 300,000

Matt Haughey, May 4th, 2004

Oldest independent digital music community and Silicon Valley nonprofit announce new copyright option for musicians

Palo Alto, CA and Jenkintown, PA, USA – DMusic, the first and oldest independent digital music community, announced today that it will offer Creative Commons licenses as an option to all DMusic contributing musicians.

The licenses, provided by the nonprofit Creative Commons, allow artists to invite fans to copy or build upon their work, on certain conditions – to declare “some rights reserved” in contrast to the “all rights reserved” of full-fledged copyright.

Dmusic will also tag Creative Commons-licensed MP3s with metadata – a machine-readable expression of the copyright license terms. The music can thus travel with its own terms of use across the Internet, enabling file-sharing networks and search engines to find and identify it as free to share with its author’s consent.

To see this search feature in action, go to AltaVista’s multimedia search engine, http://www.altavista.com/audio/ and type, in quotes, “remix me” or “creative commons.”

“The Creative Commons license provides all creators of art, music, literature, and science an opportunity to protect their creations but at the same time allow others to utilize the creation in various ways,” said Larry Feldman, DMusic owner. “DMusic recognizes the need for copyright reform around the world and has decided to take a stand for future creativity unfettered by arcane nineteenth- and twentieth-century copyright ideas. Mash culture, digital copying, cloning and sampling, pastiche and other recently introduced techniques, added to the ease of digital transformation of pre-existing materials into new art and art forms, are making the old copyright laws a drag on creativity. Artists shouldn’t have to worry about such complicated stuff. The copyright law makes the tax code look like E = MC2.”

“The best music in America is independent,” said Thomas Barger, DMusic user. Saying ‘yes’ to Creative Commons licensing is saying ‘yes’ to a commitment to reaching the widest audience possible.”

“DMusic’s move to offer Creative Commons licenses is an important step for the mainstream music community,” said Lawrence Lessig, chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at Stanford. “The Net has long facilitated music sharing and distribution – technically. Creative Commons copyright licenses, seamlessly integrated by DMusic for its willing contributors, further facilitate sharing – legally.”

About Tagging MP3s as “Some Rights Reserved”

Creative Commons copyright licenses come in three expressions: (1) an intuitive, plain-language summary (human-readable); (2) a thorough copyright license complete with all the legal nitty-gritty (lawyer-readable); and (2) a summary of the legal terms in mark-up language (machine-readable). DMusic now tags licensed MP3s with the machine-readable layer, so that search engines and fans can find and identify legally shared music.

To learn more about Creative Commons’ MP3 technology, visit http://creativecommons.org/technology/embedding.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative reuse of intellectual works – whether owned or in the public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

For our press kit, visit http://creativecommons.org/presskit/.

To learn more about Creative Commons’ international efforts, visit http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

About DMusic

DMusic is the first and oldest independent digital music community. It was founded in 1997, features approximately 100,000 independently owned music tracks uploaded from desktop computers all over the planet, and is home to over 300,000 registered users. DMusic offers free and enhanced subscriber services for musicians and fans of music, including free digital Internet radio, a CD store, options to stream or download, and lots more. DMusic LLC is a privately owned concern and a division of Lawtomation, Inc. of Jenkintown, Pennsylvania.

For more information, visit http://dmusic.com.

Contact

Neeru Paharia
Assistant Director, Creative Commons
1.650.724.3717 (tel)
neeru@creativecommons.org

Lawrence Feldman
Owner, DMusic
1.215.885.3302
leflaw@dmusic.com

Press Kit: http://creativecommons.org/presskit/

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Creative Commons Expands to Germany with the Institute for Information Law at the University of Karlsruhe (TH)

Matt Haughey, April 6th, 2004

The Institute for Information Law at the University of Karlsruhe (TH) will lead the license translation and work to expand global access to Germany’s culture.

Palo Alto, USA, and Berlin, GERMANY – April 5 – Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative works free for copying and re-use, announced today that it would expand its International Commons (iCommons) project to Germany.

The Institute for Information Law at the University of Karlsruhe (TH), Germany, will lead the effort.

First announced in March 2003, iCommons is Creative Commons’ project to disseminate its machine-readable copyright licenses worldwide and make them useful in a variety of legal systems.

As the lead institution, the Institute for Information Law at the University of Karlsruhe (TH) will coordinate a public effort to translate the Creative Commons licenses literally and legally for use in Germany.

“We are very pleased to be able to work with the excellent Institute at Karlsruhe,” said Lawrence Lessig, Chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at Stanford University, where the organization is headquartered. “Germany will play an important role in bringing the International Commons to fruition in Europe.”

“We are tremendously excited to be involved in bringing the Creative Commons movement to Germany,” explained Professor Dr. Thomas Dreier, the iCommons Germany project lead and an acclaimed authority on German copyright law.

“There is already strong demand within the German community for a legal means for facilitating the distribution of Open Content as an innovative alternative to traditional forms of distribution based on payment of royalties. Creative Commons will be a great platform on which to build these protocols and agreements. Thanks are due to Dr. Till Jaeger, who provided the first draft of the license.”

The Institute for Information Law at the University of Karlsruhe (TH) will field comments on an archived email discussion at the Creative Commons website, http://www.creativecommons.org/discuss#germany.

Germany joins Australia, Brazil, China, Croatia, Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Spain, Taiwan, and the United Kingdom in the iCommons effort.

More about Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or in the public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

For more information about iCommons, see http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

More about the Insitute for Information Law at the University of Karlsruhe (TH), Germany

The Insitute for Information Law at the University of Karlsruhe (TH) within the Center for Applied Legal Studies (Zentrum fuer Angewandte Rechtswissenschaft, ZAR) was founded in 1999. Its task is to provide teaching and research focusing on legal issues at the intersection of law, technology, and economics. Together with the departments of computer science and economics, the Institute for Information Law supports a unique diploma course in the field. Furthermore, the Institute participates in a research project on ‘Information Management and Market Engineering’, funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgesellschaft (DFG). The Institute also houses the secretariat of the German Computer Law Association (Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Recht und Informatik, DGRI). Publications of the Members of the Institute concentrate on issues in intellectual property law, internet law and corporate law.

Website: http://www.z-a-r.de

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons
christiane@creativecommons.org

Prof. Dr. Thomas Dreier (Karlsruhe)
Director, Institute for Information Law
dreier@ira.uka.de

Oliver Meyer (Karlsruhe)
Research Assistant, Institute for Information Law
oliver.meyer@ira.uni-karlsrue.de

Ellen Euler (Karlsruhe)
Research Assistant, Institute for Information Law
ellen.euler@ira.uni-karlsruhe.de

Glenn Otis Brown (Palo Alto)
Executive Director, Creative Commons
glenn@creativecommons.org

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Creative Commons Launches Legal Music Sharing and Search

Matt Haughey, March 31st, 2004

The Silicon Valley nonprofit announces new file-sharing-friendly music
license alongside its new Get Content search engine.

Austin, Texas, USA – March 18, 2004 – Creative Commons, a nonprofit
dedicated to expanding the range of creative works free to share and
build upon, announced its new Music Sharing License and Get Content
search engine at the South by Southwest Music Festival here today.

The license, which is available free of charge from the Creative Commons
website, allows musicians to clearly mark their songs as free to download
and share while protecting their commercial and other rights. The license
also helps musicians tag their works digitally, which allows Creative
Commons’ Get Content search engine to index them from the web site.

This is the music-sharing notice bands can use to invite their fans to
download and share their music noncommercially.

“Finally, musicians who want to share and fans who want legal downloads
can find each other easily and quickly,” said Neeru Paharia, Assistant
Director of Creative Commons. “The Net already makes widespread
distribution very easy – technically. The Music Sharing license, in
combination with the new Get Content search engine, lets musicians
harness the Net’s distributive power while protecting themselves –
legally.”

Matthew King Kaufman, founder of Beserkley Records and MP34U.com, said:
“If there’s going to be legal p2p, then a Creative Commons Music Sharing
license is a mandatory prerequisite.”

Like all Creative Commons tools, the Music-Sharing License uses a
three-layer interface to put fans on notice of the music’s legal status.
First is the Commons Deed, a plain-language summary of the legal
language’s key terms. Next is the Legal Code, the full copyright license
in all its nitty-gritty detail (identical to the legal code for the
Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivativeWorks license). Third is Creative
Commons’ metadata, a machine-readable expression of the license, so that
users can search for and sort sharing-friendly music with the Get Content
search engine, which indexes web pages carrying Creative Commons’ license
tags and metadata. The search engine is the first that allows users to
find content based on the permissions and restrictions associated with
it.

Links:
Creative Commons: http://creativecommons.org
Music-Sharing License: http://creativecommons.org/license/music
GET CONTENT! Search Engine: http://creativecommons.org/getcontent/

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of
intellectual works – whether owned or public domain. It is sustained by
the
generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and
Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative
Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space,
and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org/.

Contact

Neeru Paharia
Assistant Director, Creative Commons
1.650.724.3717 (tel)
neeru@creativecommons.org

Glenn Otis Brown
Executive Director, Creative Commons
1.650.723.7572 (tel)

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Creative Commons Expands To The Middle East With AGIP

Matt Haughey, March 26th, 2004

Abu-Ghazaleh Intellectual Property (AGIP) is the first to bring the International Commons (iCommons) project to the Middle East.

Palo Alto, USA, and Amman, JORDAN – March 25, 2004 – Creative Commons, a non-profit corporation dedicated to building a body of creative works free for copying and re-use, announced today that it would expand its International Commons (iCommons) project in Jordan and the Middle East. AGIP, the leading provider of intellectual property services in the Arab region, will lead this effort.

Professor Lawrence Lessig, Chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at Stanford University, in the U.S., said: “We’re very excited to have AGIP lead iCommons project in Jordan. AGIP’s participation is crucial to our growing effort in promoting the international cultural commons.”

Mr. Charles Shaban, executive director of AGIP’s Regional Office said, “We are very pleased to be the first Arab country to bring the International Commons to this region and we hope that this project will be a step forward towards building the digital commons in cyberspace.”

Meanwhile, Mr. Rami Olwan, an e-commerce legal consultant and project lead for iCommons in Jordan stated, “The international Creative Commons project is unique in the sense that it offers new concepts to the current copyright legal system.”

Announced in March 2003, iCommons is Creative Commons’ project to make its machine-readable copyright licenses useful worldwide. As the lead institution for Jordan, AGIP will coordinate a public effort to translate the Creative Commons licenses literally and legally for use there. Jordan joins Australia, Brazil, Catalonia, China, Croatia, Finland, France, Ireland, Japan, Spain, Taiwan, and the United Kingdom in this effort.

AGIP will field comments relating to their specific initiatives in archived email discussions on the Creative Commons website at:

http://creativecommons.org/discuss#/jordan

More about Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or in the public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School (U.S.), where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

For more information about iCommons, see http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

More about AGIP

Abu-Ghazaleh Intellectual Property (AGIP) is a pioneering firm in intellectual property protection in the Arab world and today remains the region’s leader in this field. When AGIP was established in 1972 under the name TMP Agents, intellectual property protection was in its infancy in the Arab region. Legislation was weak and few foreign companies attempted to protect their intellectual property in the region.

The situation has changed dramatically over the last 3 decades and AGIP today is the largest IP firm in the Arab world, managing the protection of nearly half of the global Fortune 500 firms among many others. As Arab nations have developed, they have rapidly increased the legal protections applicable to intellectual property and have continued to work on increasing the effectiveness of enforcement of IP laws. AGIP has consistently been at the forefront of efforts to improve the infrastructure of Arab intellectual property protection.

It has always been the most generous Arab contributor to regional and global intellectual property associations and has worked in close coordination with Arab governments and multilateral governmental organizations such as WIPO to improve the climate for intellectual property protection.

Operating from its headquarters in Amman, Jordan, AGIP has offices in every major Arab city with liaison offices in Europe, UK, Canada and the USA.

For more information about AGIP, please visit:

http://www.agip.com

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin, Germany)
iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons
christiane@creativecommons.org

Rami Olwan (Ammam, Jordan)
Project Lead, iCommons Jordan
rolwan@tagi.com

Glenn Otis Brown (Palo Alto, USA)
Executive Director, Creative Commons
glenn@creativecommons.org

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Creative Commons expands to Australia with Queensland University of Technology (QUT)

Matt Haughey, March 25th, 2004

Queensland University of Technology (QUT) will lead the license translation and work to expand global access to Australia’s culture

Palo Alto, USA, and Brisbane, AUSTRALIA – March 25, 2004 – Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative works free for copying and re-use, announced today that it would expand its International Commons (iCommons) project to Australia.

Queensland University of Technology (QUT), in Brisbane, will lead the effort.

First announced in March 2003, iCommons is Creative Commons’ project to make its machine-readable copyright licenses useful worldwide.

As the lead institution, QUT will coordinate a public effort to translate the Creative Commons licenses literally and legally for use in Australia.

“We are thrilled to be working with Queensland University of Technology,” said Lawrence Lessig, Chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at Stanford University, in the U.S. “Australia will be a vital participant in bringing the international cultural Commons to fruition.”

“We are also excited to be involved in developing Creative Commons in Australia,” explained Project Co-Leader Brian Fitzgerald, Professor and Head of the School of Law at QUT. “There is already strong demand within the Australian community for a legal means of facilitating the distribution of Open Content, and Creative Commons will be a tremendous platform on which to build these protocols and agreements.”

Tom Cochrane, Project Co-Leader and Deputy Vice Chancellor at QUT, said that with copyright law and regulation getting more attention by the day, QUT was pleased to be associated with this international effort to find collaborative solutions more appropriate to rapidly changing digital environments.

“Even within the University, there are already numerous direct applications of the model in our day to day academic work,” Mr Cochrane said.

QUT will field comments on an archived email discussion at the Creative Commons website, http://www.creativecommons.org/discuss#australia.

Australia joins Brazil, China, Croatia, Finland, France, Ireland, Japan, Spain, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, and Jordan in the iCommons effort.

More about Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or in the public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

For more information about iCommons, see http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

More about Queensland University of Technology

QUT is a major Australian university with a strong interest in and commitment to information law and policy. As well as its large Law Faculty, QUT is also home to the Faculty of Creative Industries, which is keen to utilize the Creative Commons model to further develop innovation in the creative industries; the Faculty of Information Technology, which is a leader in information security; and the Faculty of Business, which has recognized expertise in technology policy and innovation.

QUT’s partner in this exercise has been Ian Oi and his team at Blake Dawson Waldron Lawyers. Ian Oi is a recognized expert in Technology and Intellectual Property Issues and plays an active role in the development of law and policy in this area.

For more information about QUT, visit http://www.qut.edu.au.
For more information about Blake Dawson Waldron Lawyers, visit http://www.bdw.com.au.

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons
christiane@creativecommons.org

Professor Brian Fitzgerald (Brisbane)
Project Lead, iCommons Australia
Head of School of Law, Queensland University of Technology
email: bf.fitzgerald@qut.edu.au

Glenn Otis Brown
Executive Director (Palo Alto)
glenn@creativecommons.org

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