Press Releases

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Launches Free Classical Music Podcast – “The Concert” – Under a Creative Commons License

Eric Steuer, September 14th, 2006

Museum offers unreleased live performances by notable musicians and emerging young artists for free download and file sharing

BOSTON, MA, USA — September 14, 2006

Starting today, everyone who visits the website of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum will be able to download free classical music and share it with anyone, anywhere.

“The Concert,” the museum’s new classical music podcast, features unreleased live performances by master musicians and talented young artists recorded from the museum’s Sunday Concert Series, the nation’s longest-running museum music series. Today, the museum posts the first in a series of 45-minute podcasts, including music by Beethoven, Mozart, Schubert, and Chopin for solo piano, orchestra, string quartet, and voice. A new podcast will be posted on the 1st and 15th of every month, and users will be able to subscribe to receive free, automatic updates delivered directly to their computers or mp3 players.

With this podcast, the Gardner Museum also breaks new ground, becoming the first art museum to encourage sharing and free distribution of its online programming by using a “some rights reserved” copyright license from Creative Commons. On the website, links to the Music Sharing license encourage users to freely share the music they download in “The Concert,” making the Gardner Museum one of the few early adopters of flexible copyright in licensing classical music.

“By sharing its renowned classical music performances with all the world under a Creative Commons license, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum embraces its public, expands its reach, and steps into the future,” said Eric Saltzman, a Creative Commons founder and board member. “Creative Commons got its start across the river in Cambridge, so we’re especially pleased that the museum looked to CC to make “The Concert” series freely available online.”

The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School has worked with the museum to address legal issues relating to podcasting music and using Creative Commons licenses for podcasts.

“To be able to support the artists who perform here and, at the same time, to expand the reach of classical music is very exciting,” says Gardner Museum Music Director Scott Nickrenz. “By using podcasting technology, and with the full support of the artists, we’re going to be able, for the first time, to offer free recordings of great classical music to anyone who wants to listen, wherever they want to listen.”

The podcast is a modern continuation of the museum’s long history of supporting young artists. Artists heard in this first season of “The Concert” run the gamut from young chamber musicians to established solo pianists. The artists whose performances are featured in “The Concert” include: the Borromeo String Quartet, the Claremont Trio, violinist Corey Cerovsek, the Gardner Chamber Orchestra with conductor Douglas Boyd, harpsichordist John Gibbons, violist Kim Kashkashian, Musicians from Marlboro, flutist Paula Robison, baritone Randall Scarlata, and pianists Jeremy Denk, Paavali Jumppanen, Cecile Licad, and Seymour Lipkin. Artist and composer bios are available on the website.

“This is a great opportunity, not just for the musicians involved, but for listeners, too,” says pianist Jeremy Denk, one of the musicians heard in “The Concert” and the author of the blog Think Denk. “For such a long time, the only way to get a recording out was to go through established channels of distribution, and even then, it’s rare that a classical record is widely available. The internet has really changed that. Projects like this support new voices in classical music, and create new opportunities for audiences to hear them.”

“I don’t think Isabella Gardner could have imagined all the incredible innovations of the past century, but at its heart this podcast is a continuation of her vision for the museum, and of her spirit of adventure and creativity in supporting artists,” says Anne Hawley, Norma Jean Calderwood Director of the Gardner Museum.

The title “The Concert” is in part an homage to the Gardner Museum’s treasured Vermeer painting “The Concert,” stolen in 1990.

“THE CONCERT”: WHAT’S INSIDE

“The Concert” strives to make classical music accessible to many different kinds of listeners. Rather than re-broadcasting complete concerts, each podcast features selections from the museum’s recording archives, paired in a way that draws interesting connections between pieces and offers variety. In a single podcast, a listener may hear a Schubert song and a string quartet, or a Mozart violin sonata and a concerto. Brief introductions place the music in context for listeners. Those interested in additional information about composers or artists featured in the podcast can find bios and links on the podcast website.

The podcast is also a first step towards building a free online classical music library on the museum’s website. Each musical work featured in “The Concert” will be archived to this virtual library, sorted by performer and composer. As it grows, the library will be a resource for free classical music that can be shared with listeners around the world.

BREAKING NEW GROUND WITH CREATIVE COMMONS

All podcasts in “The Concert” are offered under a Music Sharing license from Creative Commons, meaning that users are free “to download, copy, file-share, trade, distribute, and publicly perform (e.g. webcast)” the podcast for any noncommercial purpose. The Gardner Museum’s choice to allow free sharing is a first for an art museum.

“As soon as I heard that this was an option, I knew it was the right thing for us to do,” says Scott Nickrenz. “If we’re serious about getting this music out there, we need to allow people to spread the word. Whether that means using peer-to-peer file sharing or burning a CD and sending it to your grandparents, we want people to be able to share this music in a way that works for them, using the power of the internet to spread classical music.”

The Clinical Program in Cyberlaw at Harvard’s Berkman Center (http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/home/clinical) provided support and legal counsel for the project. “This has been an exciting collaboration for us,” explains John Palfrey, Executive Director of the Berkman Center and Clinical Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. “We’re big believers in combining the innovative use of technology with the freedoms offered by a Creative Commons license to help increase everyone’s access to information, knowledge and music, like these terrific Gardner concert recordings.”


MUSIC AT THE GARDNER MUSEUM

The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum is home to the oldest museum music program in the country. From September through May, the museum hosts weekly Sunday concerts. The Sunday Concert Series features renowned musicians, and the Young Artists Showcase presents outstanding emerging artists. Composer Portraits features adventurous young performers playing the music of 20th- and 21st-century composers. Live performances from the Gardner Museum are heard frequently on radio, locally on WGBH radio and nationally on National Public Radio’s “Performance Today.”

Isabella Stewart Gardner established a legacy of music with the creation of her museum. Boston Symphony Orchestra members performed on opening night, January 1st, 1903. Isabella Stewart Gardner also supported established and emerging young musicians, including Margaret Ruthven Lang, the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s first female member. The music program at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum was formally established 79 years ago.

About the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum is a work of art itself. Housed in a Venetian-inspired palace, turned inside-out and surrounding an ever-changing courtyard garden, the museum’s collection spans more than 30 centuries and features artworks by Rembrandt, Michelangelo, Raphael, Botticelli, Degas and Sargent. Continuing the legacy of its founder, changing contemporary and historic exhibitions, the oldest museum music program in the country, seasonal courtyard garden displays, annual free days, visiting contemporary artists and innovative school and community partnerships enrich the permanent collection and provide ongoing inspiration for all.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain. Creative Commons licences provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms for authors, artists, and educators that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to offer a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. It is sustained by the generous support of various organizations including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Omidyar Network, the Hewlett Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation as well as members of the public. For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org

Contact

Charlotte Landrum
Podcast Project Manager & Marketing Associate, Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
Phone: 617.278.5106
Email

Eric Steuer
Creative Director, Creative Commons
Phone: 415.946.3039
Email

Creative Commons Press Kit

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Creative Commons Sponsored Software ccHost Releases Version 3.0

Jon Phillips, September 8th, 2006

San Francisco, USA – September 8, 2006

Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization that provides flexible
copyright licenses for authors and artists along with the Creative
Commons Developer Community released the ccHost 3.0 today. ccHost is an
Open Source web-based media sharing software. This major feature release
comes on the heals of winning the Linux Journal Linux World Expo Award
for “Best Open Source Solution” and combines approximately five months of
development, usage, and testing into packages that anyone may download,
install, and use to empower on-line media sharing communities. This
release builds upon ccHost’s novel support of collaboration, sharing,
and storage of multi-media using the different Creative Commons licenses
and metadata.

These features most notably show up and are tested in Creative Commons’
project, ccMixter (www.ccmixter.org), a popular on-line social network
service that supports legal music sharing and remixing. ccHost is the
Open Source Software engine powering ccmixter.org and which anyone may
download, install, and use to freely build media sharing communities.

Ryan Lerch, a developer from the project Open Clip Art Library
(www.openclipart.org) says, “the new release of ccHost now includes
features that we have wanted for some time. It now integrates powerful
features that will enhance both the usability and efficiency of the Open
Clip Art Library and will help us immensely in our goal of creating
a comprehensive library of public domain clip art.” The Open Clip Art
Library is but one of several projects moving their projects to use the
solid infrastructure ccHost provides.

Major features in this release include native forums, infrastructure to
support multiple languages, and an e-mail notification system. ccHost
has replaced its dependency on phpbb2 with native fully-functioning
hierarchical forums. They are totally integrated with user profiles and
administrators may specifically control them.

ccHost now supports multiple languages. There is new integration of
the standard Open Source GNU gettext-based multi-language support
tools. This allows for initial support for Italian, German, Mainland
Chinese, Taiwanese Chinese, and Brazilian Portuguese in addition to
English. The project encourages others to get involved in order to
translate ccHost into more local languages.

A user-requested feature now implemented is e-mail notifications. It
allows registered users to get e-mail whey they have been reviewed,
rated, remixed, or when someone else has uploaded a file and they want
to be alerted.

Other important features include recent reviews for the sidebars, the
‘How I Did It’ browser sorting, and tons of statistics. Stats include
number of reviews for uploads, an overview of forum messages, and times
remixed, all to help a community know about itself. ccHost also supports
XSPF 1.0 playlists as feeds, basic support for the new getid3 SVG module,
and dumping of content from ccHost to a large feed file format (useful
for search engines and external parsing).

ccHost makes the lives of administrators much easier by adding an
FTP-less file manager, a Bayesian rating scheme, sub-navigation tabs,
spam flood protection, and setting of file-permissions. External to
the core ccHost application are also several command line scripts
which admins can use to powerfully help them in their maintenance
of an installation. Of particular note is the inclusion of code from
Brazil-based Bruno Dilly’s Google Summer of Code project into a tool
called “publishcchost” which allows one to publish a file to any ccHost
installation from the command line.

This release also focuses on addressing compatibility with modern ways
software is installed on the web. ccHost 3.0 fully supports PHP 5 and
has been tested thoroughly in shared hosting setups on Dreamhost and
Freedesktop.org. Also, one outstanding bug has been squashed in that
ccHost does not require getid3 for installation.

The ccHost development community encourages new developers to
contribute to the project. The future of ccHost is bright with upcoming
development focusing on user and admin requests for features like further
generalization of media support, better tools to support social networking
features, and further language support.

Chat with other developers on channel #cc on
irc.freenode.org, join the project mailing list
(https://lists.sourceforge.net/mailman/listinfo/cctools-cchost), and
edit the project wiki page to help shape this project’s future direction
(http://wiki.creativecommons.org/wiki/ccHost).

Project Website

http://wiki.creativecommons.org/wiki/ccHost

ccHost Download

http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?
group_id=80503&package_id=156675

Feature Requests

https://sourceforge.net/tracker/?group_id=80503&atid=559969

Bug Reports

https://sourceforge.net/tracker/?atid=559966&group_id=80503&func=browse

Roadmap (Project Timeline)

http://wiki.creativecommons.org/CcHost_Roadmap

About ccHost

The goal of this project is to spread media content that is licensed
under Creative Commons throughout the web in much the same way that
weblogs spread CC licensed text. ccHost is web-based infrastructure that
may be used to host and allow for commenting, remixing, and distribution
globally. The more installations of ccHost and its variations, the more
content there will be available for enjoyment and artistic re-use in a
sane and legal setting. ccHost is what is used for the infamous Creative
Commons ccMixter project, which supports legal media sharing and remixing.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a nonprofit organization that promotes the creative
re-use of intellectual and artistic works – whether owned or in the
public domain. Creative Commons licenses provide a flexible range of
protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept
of traditional copyright to offer a voluntary “some rights reserved”
approach. Creative Commons is sustained by the generous support of various
foundations including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation,
the Omidyar Network Fund, the Hewlett Foundation, and the Rockefeller
Foundation, as well as members of the public.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org/.

Contact

Jon Phillips Developer, ccHost jon@creativecommons.org

Press Kit

http://creativecommons.org/presskit

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DROPPING KNOWLEDGE USES CREATIVE COMMONS IN ITS KNOWLEDGE-SHARING INITIATIVE

Mia Garlick, September 8th, 2006

San Francisco, USA, Berlin, Germany, September 8, 2006

Creative Commons is pleased to announce that dropping knowledge, the not-for-profit initiative that offers a global knowledge portal and dialogue forum on its website will use Creative Commons’ licenses for its innovative online resource.

On September 9, 2006, 112 creative thinkers, ranging from artists, writers and scientists to philosophers, politicians and activists, will gather in Berlin, Germany, around the world’s biggest round-table — “The Table of Free Voices” — to simultaneously answer 100 of the most pressing questions that have been raised by people from around the world. Their digitally recorded answers will provide the foundation of a new web platform designed to promote dialogue and social change.

In order to make the resulting audiovisual footage in its online resource free to share for everyone, dropping knowledge decided to publish the 11,200 answers under Creative Commons licenses. Users of the dropping knowledge web platform will be able to freely access, share and remix the recorded answers from participants as diverse as filmmaker Wim Wenders, Chinese human rights activist Harry Wu and the Greek evolutionary biologist Elisabet Sahtouris as well as many more inspiring thinkers.

Creative Commons’ licenses offer a way to legally share and remix content and, consequently, are a logical solution for and enabler of dropping knowledge’s philosophy that sharing knowledge is key to a global dialogue.

dropping knowledge’s freely accessible web-platform invites the global public to ask and answer questions, exchange viewpoints and ideas and join in conversation of global social topics. It aims to become a knowledge-resource for individuals, schools, universities, NGOs and the media, as well as socially minded businesses, foundations and organizations the world over.

About dropping knowledge

A non-profit initative with offices in Berlin and San Francisco, dropping knowledge operates as an international non-governmental organization with 100% stakeholder perspective. A public resource, it cannot be owned and is freely accessible to all for all time. dropping knowledge’s Founding Partner is the Allianz Group. Its Founding Supporters are the Mark & Sharon Bloome Fund and the Wallace Global Fund.

For general information, visit the dropping knowledge website.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain. Creative Commons licences provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms for authors, artists, and educators that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to offer a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. It is sustained by the generous support of various organizations including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Omidyar Network, the Hewlett Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation as well as members of the public.

For general information, visit the group’s website.

Contact

Christiane Henckel von Donnersmarck

Executive Director, Creative Commons International, Creative Commons

Email

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CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSES OFFERED IN COLOMBIA

Mia Garlick, August 22nd, 2006

San Francisco, CA, USA; Berlin, GERMANY; and Bogotá, Colombia — August 22, 2006 — Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative work free to share and build upon today announced the launch of its licenses in Colombia.

Creative Commons copyright licenses are available free of charge from the group’s website. The licenses allow authors and artists to mark their works as free to copy or transform under certain conditions—to declare “some rights reserved,” in contrast to the traditional “all rights reserved”—thereby enabling others to access a growing pool of raw materials without legal friction.

Staff at Creative Commons’ offices in San Francisco and Berlin worked with project leads Carolina Botero, Andrés Umaña, Jaime Rojas and Alfredo Vargas in Colombia to adapt the standardized licenses to Colombian law. Creative Commons Colombia (whose website will be available shortly here) was hosted by Universidad del Rosario – Colombia.

“The Colombian version of the Creative Commons licenses will be launched in a one day session Program being held during the morning at Universidad Politécnico Grancolombiano, Professor Lawrence Lessig of Stanford University, CEO & Chairman of Creative Commons, will deliver the keynote speech on the importance of the launch of the CC licenses in Colombia” says Andrés Umaña.

“Later in the evening a special open content session will be held in the Virgilio Barco Public Library with the participation of Colombian artists. All sessions will be webcasted vía Renata (Colombian Network of Universities) and/or using free streaming via Internet, to allow everyone around Colombia to participate”, adds Alfredo Vargas.

“CC has turned to be an important reference point in vital sectors like education, science and journalism where the commons approach has a strong influence, we will show examples of Colombian experiences in the adoption of CC licenses that we believe are important steps for free culture in South America and even in a more global context” points Carolina Botero.

“We believe CC will provide Colombians a new medium to express ourselves bringing us closer to Latin America and the world with all the amazing talents this country has through its rich artistic heritage, biodiversity and imagination. CC will also enhance the open access that is going to have a direct impact (publicly and privately) in the: cultural, scientific, entrepreneurial and education sectors. This is a success for the community we built around the project, and it is a big step for Colombian creators”, adds Jaime Rojas.

About Universidad del Rosario

Universidad del Rosario is a non-profit educational institution founded in Bogotá in 1653. As one of the most important Colombian universities, el Rosario influenced the political and civil Colombian society during its life. Its interest in supporting the CC licenses translation into the Colombian legal frame is to promote the research and education in new issues of the information society. For more information about Universidad del Rosario in Colombia visit this site.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation. For general information, visit its its website.

Contact

Carolina Botero

CC Colombia

Bogotá, Colombia

Email

Christiane Henckel von Donnersmarck
Executive Director Creative Commons International, Creative Commons

Berlin

Email

Mia Garlick

General Counsel & COO, Creative Commons

Email

The CC Colombian launch is possible thanks to the support of different entities, mainly:

Universidad Politécnico Grancolombiano: its involvement in the technological development of the Colombian educational sector became an important key aspect of its dedication to promote the use of ICTs in a socially responsible way. The University leads the Internet 2 University networks and is involved in the development of digital contents in higher education. For more information visit this site. And for the event’s webcast visit this site.

eltiempo.com: Colombia´s main internet news portal launched in July 15th, 2006 it’s social participation section where bloggers and photobloggers and general public can participate building the new Colombian media landscape. And from the 22nd of august this citizen journalism site will use CC as its community tool. For more information this site.

Support was also given by: Ministerio de Educación Colombiano, el directorio Free Software Community and Fundación Karisma.

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CREATIVE COMMONS SELECTED BY GOOD MAGAZINE AS NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION FOR CHOOSE GOOD CAMPAIGN

Francesca Rodriquez, July 12th, 2006

San Francisco, California — July 12, 2006

Creative Commons is proud to announce today that it has been named as one of twelve non-profit organizations that will participate in the innovative subscription strategy — the CHOOSE GOOD campaign — that accompanies the launch of GOOD magazine.

Launching nationwide this Fall, GOOD magazine strives to elevate the level of debate among its target demographic of intelligent, ambitious, youthful people aged 21 through 35. Founded by Ben Goldhirsh, GOOD is focused on the people, ideas, and institutions affecting change in the world. The magazine intends to examine the intersection of idealism and capitalism, and living well by doing “good”. GOOD will serve as a platform for talented contributors and writers to bring to the forefront issues and ideas that matter.

As part of the CHOOSE GOOD campaign, GOOD has chosen 12 charity organizations that represent issues and ideals that accord with GOOD’s mission. In addition to Creative Commons, CHOOSE GOOD partners also include Teach For America, Ashoka, Donors Choose, Witness, OCEANA, World Wildlife Fund, Millennium Promise, UNICEF, Room to Read, Generation Engage, and City Year.

A new subscriber to GOOD can elect to participate in the CHOOSE GOOD campaign by choosing one of the 12 charities as the recipient of a donation from GOOD for the entire amount of their $20 subscription fee. In the case of Creative Commons, GOOD’s aims to raise $60,000 in order to provide more than 20 international legal jurisdictions with the legal tools and technologies that allow them to more easily and efficiently distribute their creative works on the Internet.

GOOD magazine is also offering magazine contributors the option to CC license their contributions under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-No Derivatives license.

“We’re honored to have been selected as a CHOOSE GOOD partner and to be in the company of so many other great organizations,” said Francesca Rodriquez of Creative Commons. “Creative Commons hopes that our participation in the CHOOSE GOOD campaign will confirm our role as a key enabler of and contributor to topical debates.”

“Creative Commons is a perfect example of the nature of programs and policies GOOD aims to highlight,” said Max Schorr, GOOD’s editor and publisher. “Their particular initiative encourages creativity and more valuable content, which are vital aspects of our editorial and overall mission.”

About GOOD Magazine

Launching in September 2006, GOOD magazine and its companion web site, www.goodmagazine.com, are high impact media properties that will catalyze positive thought and action. GOOD will examine the intersection between idealism and capitalism with surprising perspectives by talented writers and contributors and features on the prodigies of innovation and culture. In an effort to elevate the level of debate among the critical group of educated, media-savvy, engaged, creative, worldly young-minded citizens, GOOD will engage the public in things that matter by showcasing the people, ideas, and institutions driving change in the world. GOOD will crystallize and bring to light the new definition of what it means to be “good” in today’s society. For more information, please visit www.goodmagazine.com.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain. Creative Commons licences provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms for authors, artists, and educators that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to offer a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. It is sustained by the generous support of various organizations including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network, the Hewlett Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation as well as members of the public. For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact


Creative Commons:


Francesca Rodriquez

Project Manager, Creative Commons

Email

GOOD Magazine:

Alissa Neil

212.431.4411

Email

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SCOOPTWORDS PARTNERS WITH CREATIVE COMMONS TO HELP BLOGGERS MONETIZE THEIR WORK

Eric Steuer, July 10th, 2006

San Francisco, USA — July 10, 2006

Scoopt, the citizen journalism agency that serves as a broker for selling user-created content to commercial media, has announced that it is offering Creative Commons licenses through its newly launched ScooptWords service.

ScooptWords was designed to create a market between bloggers and commercial publishers. Once bloggers have registered for a free Scoopt membership, they can add a ScooptWords button to their site that flags their written content as available for sale. Newspaper and magazine editors can then click the ScooptWords button to license blog content for commercial use. The blogger receives 75% of the sales revenue (50% for the first transaction).

Within the ScooptWords interface, bloggers can add a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial license to their blog alongside the Scoopt commercial badge. The Creative Commons license lets authors easily and efficiently signal to the public that their work may be freely shared, reused, and remixed by people for noncommercial purposes.

“There’s a lot of great blog content out there ¬— some of it is every bit as good as content produced by professional journalists,” said Graham Holliday, ScooptWords’ managing editor. “However, there’s no obvious route to market for the blogger or way to buy content for the editor. So we launched ScooptWords to make this connection.”

“ScooptWords offers bloggers a great way to monetize their work, while still engaging in the participatory culture of the Web,” said Eric Steuer, creative director of Creative Commons. “Scoopt has come up with an innovative and workable way for bloggers to interact with print media, and be rewarded for it. We’re glad that Scoopt has chosen Creative Commons licensing to encourage bloggers to make their work part of a growing resource of shared and freely-available information.”

About Scoopt
Scoopt is a media agency that brokers commercial deals between content creators and content users. The privately owned company was founded in July 2005 by Kyle MacRae, a freelance journalist. For general information, visit http://scoopt.com and http://scoopt.com/words.

About Creative Commons
Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works — whether owned or in the public domain. Creative Commons licenses provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms for authors, artists and educators that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to offer a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. It is sustained by the generous support of various foundations including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, the Hewlett Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation as well as members of the public.

Contact

Eric Steuer
Creative Director, Creative Commons
(415) 946-3039
Email

Press Kit

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CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSES OFFERED IN PERU

Mia Garlick, June 29th, 2006

Silicon Valley-based NGO reinforces its activities around the globe and introduces its innovative copyright licenses in Peru.

San Francisco, CA, USA; Berlin, GERMANY; and Lima, Peru — June 29, 2006 — Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative work free to share and build upon today announced the launch of its licenses in Peru.

Creative Commons copyright licenses are available free of charge from the group’s website. The licenses allow authors and artists to mark their works as free to copy or transform under certain conditions—to declare “some rights reserved,” in contrast to the traditional “all rights reserved”—thereby enabling others to access a growing pool of raw materials without legal friction.

Staff at Creative Commons’ offices in San Francisco and Berlin worked with a project leads Oscar Montezuma and Pedro Mendizabal in Peru to adapt the standardized licenses to Peruvian law. Creative Commons Peru is hosted by Computers Professionals for Social Responsibility – Peru (CPSR-Peru).

“The Peruvian version of the Creative Commons licenses will be launched after the iLaw Program 2006 being held at Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru. Professor Lawrence Lessig of Stanford University, CEO & Chairman of Creative Commons, will deliver the keynote speech on the importance of Creative Commons Peru”, says Oscar Montezuma.

“CC has been very well received in Peru. It has quickly gained the interest of many individuals and institutions ranging from the private to public sector. Success has been such, that I think Peru can eventually become a promising global free culture spot in South America“.

“We are proud of the achievements of the Creative Commons community in Peru. This is a success for all Peruvian authors and creators,“ adds Pedro Mendizabal.

The President of the National Institute of Defense of the Competition and the Protection of Intellectual Property (INDECOPI), Santiago Roca, greeted the launching of Creative Commons Perú, welcoming it as a legitimate exercise of authors that would allow them to grant universal access of their works, without the obligation of economic compensation.

About CPSR-Peru

CPSR-Peru is a public interest research centre on information and communications technology (ICT). Founded in Lima in October 2002, as a civil society non-profit association, its mission is to promote the use and development of ICT in a socially responsible way; to influence the process of public policies decision-making related to ICT and to foster the development of a more humane information society. For more information about CPSR-Peru visit their site.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network, and the Hewlett Foundation. For general information, visit their site.

Contact

Oscar Montezuma

CPSR-Peru, Lima

Email

Christiane Henckel von Donnersmarck

Executive Director Creative Commons International, Creative Commons

Email

Mia Garlick

General Counsel & COO, Creative Commons

Email

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Microsoft and Creative Commons Release Tool for Copyright Licensing

Eric Steuer, June 21st, 2006

The organizations announce availability of Microsoft Office add-in that enables easy access to Creative Commons copyright licenses.

Redmond, WA, USA; San Francisco, CA, USA – June 20, 2006

Microsoft Corp. and Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization that offers flexible copyright licenses for creative works, have teamed up to release a copyright licensing tool that enables the easy addition of Creative Commons licensing information for works in popular Microsoft® Office applications. The copyright licensing tool will be available free of charge at Microsoft Office Online. The tool will enable the 400 million users of Microsoft Office Word, Microsoft Office Excel® and Microsoft Office PowerPoint® to select one of several Creative Commons licenses from within the specific application.

“We’re delighted to work with Creative Commons to bring fresh and collaborative thinking on copyright licensing to authors and artists of all kinds,” said Craig Mundie, chief research and strategy officer at Microsoft. “We are honored that creative thinkers everywhere choose to use Microsoft tools to give shape to their ideas. We’re committed to removing barriers to the sharing of ideas across borders and cultures, and are offering this copyright tool in that
spirit.”

“The goal of Creative Commons is to provide authors and artists with simple tools to mark their creative work with the freedom they intend it to carry,” said Lawrence Lessig, professor of law at Stanford Law School and founder of
Creative Commons. “We’re incredibly excited to work with Microsoft to make that ability easily available to the hundreds of millions of users of Microsoft Office.”

“It’s thrilling to see big companies like Microsoft working with nonprofits to make it easier for artists and creators to distribute their works,” said Gilberto Gil, cultural minister of Brazil, host nation for the Creative Commons iSummit in Rio de Janeiro June 23 through 25, where the copyright licensing tool will be featured. Gil, who will keynote at the iSummit, has released one of the first documents using the Creative Commons add-in for Microsoft Office.

The goal of the Creative Commons licenses is to give an author a clearer ability to express his or her intentions regarding the use of the work. The Microsoft Office tool allows users to choose from a variety of Creative Commons licenses that enable an author to retain copyright ownership, yet permit the work to be copied and distributed with certain possible restrictions, such as whether or not the work can be used commercially and whether or not modifications can be made to the work. The full list of licenses available from Creative Commons is available online at http://creativecommons.org/about/licenses/meet-the-licenses. The tool also provides a way for users to dedicate a work to the public domain.

“Microsoft’s openness in working with the Creative Commons is a very exciting because an author can now easily embed licenses to creative works during the process of innovation,” said Ian Angell, professor of Information Systems at the London School of Economics (LSE). “This is an important step in ensuring that each individual becomes aware of his or her own intellectual property rights — and those of others. We at the LSE are keen to work with Microsoft toward empowering the ‘creators of intellectual wealth’ to become more involved in its commercial use.” The LSE partners with Creative Commons to drive Creative Commons license adoption and awareness in England and Wales.

“Creative Commons licenses are essential for protecting my creative work and for sharing it with others. They help with copyright issues, which frees me to do my job: making movies. I’m glad Microsoft Office users can now so easily
use Creative Commons’ tools,” said Davis Guggenheim, director of the documentaries “An Inconvenient Truth” and “Teach” and member of the board of directors of Creative Commons.

“The collaboration of Microsoft and Creative Commons to bring Creative Commons licenses to Microsoft Office applications underscores how for-profit companies and nonprofit organizations can work together to bring innovative
ideas and tools to the public,” said Alan Yates, general manager of the Information Worker Division at Microsoft.

Microsoft and Creative Commons partnered with 3sharp LLC, a Redmond-based independent solution provider to develop and test the copyright licensing tool.

About Microsoft
Founded in 1975, Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT”) is the worldwide leader in software, services and solutions that help people and businesses realize their full potential.

About Creative Commons
Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works — whether owned or in the public domain. Creative Commons licenses provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms for authors, artists and educators that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to offer a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. It is sustained by the generous support of various foundations including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, the Hewlett Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation as well as members of the public. For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Jessica Coffman
Waggener Edstrom Worldwide
(425) 638-7000
Email

Rapid Response Team
Waggener Edstrom Worldwide
(503) 443-7070
Email

Eric Steuer
Creative Commons
(415) 946-3039
Email

Creative Commons Press Kit

Note to editors: If you are interested in viewing additional information on Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft Web page at http://www.microsoft.com/presspass on Microsoft’s corporate information pages. Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication, but may since have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/contactpr.mspx.

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CREATIVE COMMONS ANNOUNCES OPEN VIDEO CONTEST WITH THE FEDORA PROJECT

Eric Steuer, June 20th, 2006

San Francisco, USA – June 20, 2006

Creative Commons and the Fedora Project are pleased to announce the Open Video Contest taking place now. The contest promotes flexible copyright, open media formats and the Fedora Project.

Entries must be 30 seconds or less, in OGG Theora format, promote freedom and openness, and be released under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 license.

Visit http://creativecommons.org/video/openvideocontest/ before July 20, 2006 to enter.

The contest will be judged by representatives of the Fedora Project and Red Hat, Creative Commons jurisdiction leads from Brazil, Nigeria, and Poland, and a representative of the Wikimedia Foundation Special Projects Committee.

“This contest spreads the message that a combination of open licensing, open formats and open source software gives creators, consumers, and developers infinite freedom” says Alex Maier, Chair of Fedora Ambassadors Steering Committee.

About OGG Theora

Theora is an open, royalty-free video codec developed by the Xiph.org Foundation as part of the Ogg multimedia framework. Theora is released to the public under a BSD-style open source software license, completely free for commercial or noncommercial use. For more information about Theora visit http://theora.org.

About the Fedora Project

The Fedora Project is a Red Hat-sponsored and community-supported open source project. The goal? Work with the Linux community to build a complete, general purpose operating system exclusively from free software. Public forum. Rapid progress. Open process. A proving ground for new technology that may eventually make its way into Red Hat products.

Fedora Core is an operating system and platform, based on Linux, that is always free for anyone to use, modify and distribute, now and forever. It is developed by a large community of people who strive to provide and maintain the very best in free, open source software and standards.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a nonprofit organization that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works – whether owned or in the public domain. Creative Commons licenses provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to offer a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons is sustained by the generous support of various foundations including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, the Hewlett Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit the organization’s Web site (http://creativecommons.org/).

Contact
Eric Steuer
Creative Director, Creative Commons
Email

Press Kit

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CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSES OFFERED IN DENMARK

Mia Garlick, June 12th, 2006

San Francisco, USA, Berlin, GERMANY – June 12, 2006

Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization that provides flexible copyright licenses for authors and artists, unveiled a localized version of its innovative licensing system in Denmark on Saturday.

Creative Commons copyright licenses are available free of charge from the group’s website.The licenses allow authors and artists to mark their works as free to copy or transform under certain conditions—to declare “some rights reserved,” in contrast to the traditional “all rights reserved”—thereby enabling others to access a growing pool of creative materials without legal friction.
Staff at Creative Commons’ offices in San Francisco and Berlin worked with Project Leads Thomas Riis and Jan Trzaskowski to adapt the standardized
licenses to Danish law. Creative Commons Denmark are supported by the Law Department of Copenhagen Business School.

On June 10, the Danish versions of the Creative Commons licenses were launched in Copenhagen at a ceremony held in Politikens Foredragssal. At
the event, hosted by Copenhagen Business School, Professor Lawrence Lessig (Chairman and CEO of Creative Commons) gave the keynote
address. The ceremony was sponsored by Copenhagen Business School, Bender von Haller Dragsted law firm and IBM Denmark.

Says Dr. Thomas Riis, “The Creative Commons licenses will benefit the cultural life in Denmark. Creators and users of everything from music,
weblogs and homepages to paintings and books will profit from the licenses.” Dr. Jan Trzaskowski adds that “the licenses make it much easier
and faster to exchange creative works, which falls perfectly in line with the vibrant cultural life in today’s Denmark”.

About Copenhagen Business School

Copenhagen Business School (CBS) has around 14,000 students and an annual intake of around 1,000 exchange students. With this number of students as well as around 400 full-time researchers and around 500 administrative employees,
CBS is the one of the 3 largest business schools in Northern Europe. The
Law Department’s aim is to maintain, develop and present research of a
high standard within the field of commercial law. Commercial law is
subject to research together with other faculty activities. For general information, visit their website.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain. Creative Commons licences provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms for authors, artists, and educators that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to offer a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. It is sustained by the generous support of various foundations including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, the Hewlett Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation as well as members of the public. For general information, visit their website.

Contact

Christiane Henckel von Donnersmarck

Executive Director, Creative Commons International, Creative Commons

Email

Press Kit

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