Press Releases

CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSES OFFERED IN COLOMBIA

Mia Garlick, August 22nd, 2006

San Francisco, CA, USA; Berlin, GERMANY; and Bogotá, Colombia — August 22, 2006 — Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative work free to share and build upon today announced the launch of its licenses in Colombia.

Creative Commons copyright licenses are available free of charge from the group’s website. The licenses allow authors and artists to mark their works as free to copy or transform under certain conditions—to declare “some rights reserved,” in contrast to the traditional “all rights reserved”—thereby enabling others to access a growing pool of raw materials without legal friction.

Staff at Creative Commons’ offices in San Francisco and Berlin worked with project leads Carolina Botero, Andrés Umaña, Jaime Rojas and Alfredo Vargas in Colombia to adapt the standardized licenses to Colombian law. Creative Commons Colombia (whose website will be available shortly here) was hosted by Universidad del Rosario – Colombia.

“The Colombian version of the Creative Commons licenses will be launched in a one day session Program being held during the morning at Universidad Politécnico Grancolombiano, Professor Lawrence Lessig of Stanford University, CEO & Chairman of Creative Commons, will deliver the keynote speech on the importance of the launch of the CC licenses in Colombia” says Andrés Umaña.

“Later in the evening a special open content session will be held in the Virgilio Barco Public Library with the participation of Colombian artists. All sessions will be webcasted vía Renata (Colombian Network of Universities) and/or using free streaming via Internet, to allow everyone around Colombia to participate”, adds Alfredo Vargas.

“CC has turned to be an important reference point in vital sectors like education, science and journalism where the commons approach has a strong influence, we will show examples of Colombian experiences in the adoption of CC licenses that we believe are important steps for free culture in South America and even in a more global context” points Carolina Botero.

“We believe CC will provide Colombians a new medium to express ourselves bringing us closer to Latin America and the world with all the amazing talents this country has through its rich artistic heritage, biodiversity and imagination. CC will also enhance the open access that is going to have a direct impact (publicly and privately) in the: cultural, scientific, entrepreneurial and education sectors. This is a success for the community we built around the project, and it is a big step for Colombian creators”, adds Jaime Rojas.

About Universidad del Rosario

Universidad del Rosario is a non-profit educational institution founded in Bogotá in 1653. As one of the most important Colombian universities, el Rosario influenced the political and civil Colombian society during its life. Its interest in supporting the CC licenses translation into the Colombian legal frame is to promote the research and education in new issues of the information society. For more information about Universidad del Rosario in Colombia visit this site.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation. For general information, visit its its website.

Contact

Carolina Botero

CC Colombia

Bogotá, Colombia

Email

Christiane Henckel von Donnersmarck
Executive Director Creative Commons International, Creative Commons

Berlin

Email

Mia Garlick

General Counsel & COO, Creative Commons

Email

The CC Colombian launch is possible thanks to the support of different entities, mainly:

Universidad Politécnico Grancolombiano: its involvement in the technological development of the Colombian educational sector became an important key aspect of its dedication to promote the use of ICTs in a socially responsible way. The University leads the Internet 2 University networks and is involved in the development of digital contents in higher education. For more information visit this site. And for the event’s webcast visit this site.

eltiempo.com: Colombia´s main internet news portal launched in July 15th, 2006 it’s social participation section where bloggers and photobloggers and general public can participate building the new Colombian media landscape. And from the 22nd of august this citizen journalism site will use CC as its community tool. For more information this site.

Support was also given by: Ministerio de Educación Colombiano, el directorio Free Software Community and Fundación Karisma.

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CREATIVE COMMONS SELECTED BY GOOD MAGAZINE AS NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION FOR CHOOSE GOOD CAMPAIGN

Francesca Rodriquez, July 12th, 2006

San Francisco, California — July 12, 2006

Creative Commons is proud to announce today that it has been named as one of twelve non-profit organizations that will participate in the innovative subscription strategy — the CHOOSE GOOD campaign — that accompanies the launch of GOOD magazine.

Launching nationwide this Fall, GOOD magazine strives to elevate the level of debate among its target demographic of intelligent, ambitious, youthful people aged 21 through 35. Founded by Ben Goldhirsh, GOOD is focused on the people, ideas, and institutions affecting change in the world. The magazine intends to examine the intersection of idealism and capitalism, and living well by doing “good”. GOOD will serve as a platform for talented contributors and writers to bring to the forefront issues and ideas that matter.

As part of the CHOOSE GOOD campaign, GOOD has chosen 12 charity organizations that represent issues and ideals that accord with GOOD’s mission. In addition to Creative Commons, CHOOSE GOOD partners also include Teach For America, Ashoka, Donors Choose, Witness, OCEANA, World Wildlife Fund, Millennium Promise, UNICEF, Room to Read, Generation Engage, and City Year.

A new subscriber to GOOD can elect to participate in the CHOOSE GOOD campaign by choosing one of the 12 charities as the recipient of a donation from GOOD for the entire amount of their $20 subscription fee. In the case of Creative Commons, GOOD’s aims to raise $60,000 in order to provide more than 20 international legal jurisdictions with the legal tools and technologies that allow them to more easily and efficiently distribute their creative works on the Internet.

GOOD magazine is also offering magazine contributors the option to CC license their contributions under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-No Derivatives license.

“We’re honored to have been selected as a CHOOSE GOOD partner and to be in the company of so many other great organizations,” said Francesca Rodriquez of Creative Commons. “Creative Commons hopes that our participation in the CHOOSE GOOD campaign will confirm our role as a key enabler of and contributor to topical debates.”

“Creative Commons is a perfect example of the nature of programs and policies GOOD aims to highlight,” said Max Schorr, GOOD’s editor and publisher. “Their particular initiative encourages creativity and more valuable content, which are vital aspects of our editorial and overall mission.”

About GOOD Magazine

Launching in September 2006, GOOD magazine and its companion web site, www.goodmagazine.com, are high impact media properties that will catalyze positive thought and action. GOOD will examine the intersection between idealism and capitalism with surprising perspectives by talented writers and contributors and features on the prodigies of innovation and culture. In an effort to elevate the level of debate among the critical group of educated, media-savvy, engaged, creative, worldly young-minded citizens, GOOD will engage the public in things that matter by showcasing the people, ideas, and institutions driving change in the world. GOOD will crystallize and bring to light the new definition of what it means to be “good” in today’s society. For more information, please visit www.goodmagazine.com.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain. Creative Commons licences provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms for authors, artists, and educators that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to offer a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. It is sustained by the generous support of various organizations including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network, the Hewlett Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation as well as members of the public. For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact


Creative Commons:


Francesca Rodriquez

Project Manager, Creative Commons

Email

GOOD Magazine:

Alissa Neil

212.431.4411

Email

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SCOOPTWORDS PARTNERS WITH CREATIVE COMMONS TO HELP BLOGGERS MONETIZE THEIR WORK

Eric Steuer, July 10th, 2006

San Francisco, USA — July 10, 2006

Scoopt, the citizen journalism agency that serves as a broker for selling user-created content to commercial media, has announced that it is offering Creative Commons licenses through its newly launched ScooptWords service.

ScooptWords was designed to create a market between bloggers and commercial publishers. Once bloggers have registered for a free Scoopt membership, they can add a ScooptWords button to their site that flags their written content as available for sale. Newspaper and magazine editors can then click the ScooptWords button to license blog content for commercial use. The blogger receives 75% of the sales revenue (50% for the first transaction).

Within the ScooptWords interface, bloggers can add a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial license to their blog alongside the Scoopt commercial badge. The Creative Commons license lets authors easily and efficiently signal to the public that their work may be freely shared, reused, and remixed by people for noncommercial purposes.

“There’s a lot of great blog content out there ¬— some of it is every bit as good as content produced by professional journalists,” said Graham Holliday, ScooptWords’ managing editor. “However, there’s no obvious route to market for the blogger or way to buy content for the editor. So we launched ScooptWords to make this connection.”

“ScooptWords offers bloggers a great way to monetize their work, while still engaging in the participatory culture of the Web,” said Eric Steuer, creative director of Creative Commons. “Scoopt has come up with an innovative and workable way for bloggers to interact with print media, and be rewarded for it. We’re glad that Scoopt has chosen Creative Commons licensing to encourage bloggers to make their work part of a growing resource of shared and freely-available information.”

About Scoopt
Scoopt is a media agency that brokers commercial deals between content creators and content users. The privately owned company was founded in July 2005 by Kyle MacRae, a freelance journalist. For general information, visit http://scoopt.com and http://scoopt.com/words.

About Creative Commons
Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works — whether owned or in the public domain. Creative Commons licenses provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms for authors, artists and educators that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to offer a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. It is sustained by the generous support of various foundations including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, the Hewlett Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation as well as members of the public.

Contact

Eric Steuer
Creative Director, Creative Commons
(415) 946-3039
Email

Press Kit

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CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSES OFFERED IN PERU

Mia Garlick, June 29th, 2006

Silicon Valley-based NGO reinforces its activities around the globe and introduces its innovative copyright licenses in Peru.

San Francisco, CA, USA; Berlin, GERMANY; and Lima, Peru — June 29, 2006 — Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative work free to share and build upon today announced the launch of its licenses in Peru.

Creative Commons copyright licenses are available free of charge from the group’s website. The licenses allow authors and artists to mark their works as free to copy or transform under certain conditions—to declare “some rights reserved,” in contrast to the traditional “all rights reserved”—thereby enabling others to access a growing pool of raw materials without legal friction.

Staff at Creative Commons’ offices in San Francisco and Berlin worked with a project leads Oscar Montezuma and Pedro Mendizabal in Peru to adapt the standardized licenses to Peruvian law. Creative Commons Peru is hosted by Computers Professionals for Social Responsibility – Peru (CPSR-Peru).

“The Peruvian version of the Creative Commons licenses will be launched after the iLaw Program 2006 being held at Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru. Professor Lawrence Lessig of Stanford University, CEO & Chairman of Creative Commons, will deliver the keynote speech on the importance of Creative Commons Peru”, says Oscar Montezuma.

“CC has been very well received in Peru. It has quickly gained the interest of many individuals and institutions ranging from the private to public sector. Success has been such, that I think Peru can eventually become a promising global free culture spot in South America“.

“We are proud of the achievements of the Creative Commons community in Peru. This is a success for all Peruvian authors and creators,“ adds Pedro Mendizabal.

The President of the National Institute of Defense of the Competition and the Protection of Intellectual Property (INDECOPI), Santiago Roca, greeted the launching of Creative Commons Perú, welcoming it as a legitimate exercise of authors that would allow them to grant universal access of their works, without the obligation of economic compensation.

About CPSR-Peru

CPSR-Peru is a public interest research centre on information and communications technology (ICT). Founded in Lima in October 2002, as a civil society non-profit association, its mission is to promote the use and development of ICT in a socially responsible way; to influence the process of public policies decision-making related to ICT and to foster the development of a more humane information society. For more information about CPSR-Peru visit their site.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network, and the Hewlett Foundation. For general information, visit their site.

Contact

Oscar Montezuma

CPSR-Peru, Lima

Email

Christiane Henckel von Donnersmarck

Executive Director Creative Commons International, Creative Commons

Email

Mia Garlick

General Counsel & COO, Creative Commons

Email

Press Kit

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Microsoft and Creative Commons Release Tool for Copyright Licensing

Eric Steuer, June 21st, 2006

The organizations announce availability of Microsoft Office add-in that enables easy access to Creative Commons copyright licenses.

Redmond, WA, USA; San Francisco, CA, USA – June 20, 2006

Microsoft Corp. and Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization that offers flexible copyright licenses for creative works, have teamed up to release a copyright licensing tool that enables the easy addition of Creative Commons licensing information for works in popular Microsoft® Office applications. The copyright licensing tool will be available free of charge at Microsoft Office Online. The tool will enable the 400 million users of Microsoft Office Word, Microsoft Office Excel® and Microsoft Office PowerPoint® to select one of several Creative Commons licenses from within the specific application.

“We’re delighted to work with Creative Commons to bring fresh and collaborative thinking on copyright licensing to authors and artists of all kinds,” said Craig Mundie, chief research and strategy officer at Microsoft. “We are honored that creative thinkers everywhere choose to use Microsoft tools to give shape to their ideas. We’re committed to removing barriers to the sharing of ideas across borders and cultures, and are offering this copyright tool in that
spirit.”

“The goal of Creative Commons is to provide authors and artists with simple tools to mark their creative work with the freedom they intend it to carry,” said Lawrence Lessig, professor of law at Stanford Law School and founder of
Creative Commons. “We’re incredibly excited to work with Microsoft to make that ability easily available to the hundreds of millions of users of Microsoft Office.”

“It’s thrilling to see big companies like Microsoft working with nonprofits to make it easier for artists and creators to distribute their works,” said Gilberto Gil, cultural minister of Brazil, host nation for the Creative Commons iSummit in Rio de Janeiro June 23 through 25, where the copyright licensing tool will be featured. Gil, who will keynote at the iSummit, has released one of the first documents using the Creative Commons add-in for Microsoft Office.

The goal of the Creative Commons licenses is to give an author a clearer ability to express his or her intentions regarding the use of the work. The Microsoft Office tool allows users to choose from a variety of Creative Commons licenses that enable an author to retain copyright ownership, yet permit the work to be copied and distributed with certain possible restrictions, such as whether or not the work can be used commercially and whether or not modifications can be made to the work. The full list of licenses available from Creative Commons is available online at http://creativecommons.org/about/licenses/meet-the-licenses. The tool also provides a way for users to dedicate a work to the public domain.

“Microsoft’s openness in working with the Creative Commons is a very exciting because an author can now easily embed licenses to creative works during the process of innovation,” said Ian Angell, professor of Information Systems at the London School of Economics (LSE). “This is an important step in ensuring that each individual becomes aware of his or her own intellectual property rights — and those of others. We at the LSE are keen to work with Microsoft toward empowering the ‘creators of intellectual wealth’ to become more involved in its commercial use.” The LSE partners with Creative Commons to drive Creative Commons license adoption and awareness in England and Wales.

“Creative Commons licenses are essential for protecting my creative work and for sharing it with others. They help with copyright issues, which frees me to do my job: making movies. I’m glad Microsoft Office users can now so easily
use Creative Commons’ tools,” said Davis Guggenheim, director of the documentaries “An Inconvenient Truth” and “Teach” and member of the board of directors of Creative Commons.

“The collaboration of Microsoft and Creative Commons to bring Creative Commons licenses to Microsoft Office applications underscores how for-profit companies and nonprofit organizations can work together to bring innovative
ideas and tools to the public,” said Alan Yates, general manager of the Information Worker Division at Microsoft.

Microsoft and Creative Commons partnered with 3sharp LLC, a Redmond-based independent solution provider to develop and test the copyright licensing tool.

About Microsoft
Founded in 1975, Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT”) is the worldwide leader in software, services and solutions that help people and businesses realize their full potential.

About Creative Commons
Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works — whether owned or in the public domain. Creative Commons licenses provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms for authors, artists and educators that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to offer a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. It is sustained by the generous support of various foundations including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, the Hewlett Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation as well as members of the public. For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

Contact

Jessica Coffman
Waggener Edstrom Worldwide
(425) 638-7000
Email

Rapid Response Team
Waggener Edstrom Worldwide
(503) 443-7070
Email

Eric Steuer
Creative Commons
(415) 946-3039
Email

Creative Commons Press Kit

Note to editors: If you are interested in viewing additional information on Microsoft, please visit the Microsoft Web page at http://www.microsoft.com/presspass on Microsoft’s corporate information pages. Web links, telephone numbers and titles were correct at time of publication, but may since have changed. For additional assistance, journalists and analysts may contact Microsoft’s Rapid Response Team or other appropriate contacts listed at http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/contactpr.mspx.

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CREATIVE COMMONS ANNOUNCES OPEN VIDEO CONTEST WITH THE FEDORA PROJECT

Eric Steuer, June 20th, 2006

San Francisco, USA – June 20, 2006

Creative Commons and the Fedora Project are pleased to announce the Open Video Contest taking place now. The contest promotes flexible copyright, open media formats and the Fedora Project.

Entries must be 30 seconds or less, in OGG Theora format, promote freedom and openness, and be released under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.5 license.

Visit http://creativecommons.org/video/openvideocontest/ before July 20, 2006 to enter.

The contest will be judged by representatives of the Fedora Project and Red Hat, Creative Commons jurisdiction leads from Brazil, Nigeria, and Poland, and a representative of the Wikimedia Foundation Special Projects Committee.

“This contest spreads the message that a combination of open licensing, open formats and open source software gives creators, consumers, and developers infinite freedom” says Alex Maier, Chair of Fedora Ambassadors Steering Committee.

About OGG Theora

Theora is an open, royalty-free video codec developed by the Xiph.org Foundation as part of the Ogg multimedia framework. Theora is released to the public under a BSD-style open source software license, completely free for commercial or noncommercial use. For more information about Theora visit http://theora.org.

About the Fedora Project

The Fedora Project is a Red Hat-sponsored and community-supported open source project. The goal? Work with the Linux community to build a complete, general purpose operating system exclusively from free software. Public forum. Rapid progress. Open process. A proving ground for new technology that may eventually make its way into Red Hat products.

Fedora Core is an operating system and platform, based on Linux, that is always free for anyone to use, modify and distribute, now and forever. It is developed by a large community of people who strive to provide and maintain the very best in free, open source software and standards.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a nonprofit organization that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works – whether owned or in the public domain. Creative Commons licenses provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to offer a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. Creative Commons is sustained by the generous support of various foundations including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, the Hewlett Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation, as well as members of the public. For more information about Creative Commons, visit the organization’s Web site (http://creativecommons.org/).

Contact
Eric Steuer
Creative Director, Creative Commons
Email

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CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSES OFFERED IN DENMARK

Mia Garlick, June 12th, 2006

San Francisco, USA, Berlin, GERMANY – June 12, 2006

Creative Commons, a nonprofit organization that provides flexible copyright licenses for authors and artists, unveiled a localized version of its innovative licensing system in Denmark on Saturday.

Creative Commons copyright licenses are available free of charge from the group’s website.The licenses allow authors and artists to mark their works as free to copy or transform under certain conditions—to declare “some rights reserved,” in contrast to the traditional “all rights reserved”—thereby enabling others to access a growing pool of creative materials without legal friction.
Staff at Creative Commons’ offices in San Francisco and Berlin worked with Project Leads Thomas Riis and Jan Trzaskowski to adapt the standardized
licenses to Danish law. Creative Commons Denmark are supported by the Law Department of Copenhagen Business School.

On June 10, the Danish versions of the Creative Commons licenses were launched in Copenhagen at a ceremony held in Politikens Foredragssal. At
the event, hosted by Copenhagen Business School, Professor Lawrence Lessig (Chairman and CEO of Creative Commons) gave the keynote
address. The ceremony was sponsored by Copenhagen Business School, Bender von Haller Dragsted law firm and IBM Denmark.

Says Dr. Thomas Riis, “The Creative Commons licenses will benefit the cultural life in Denmark. Creators and users of everything from music,
weblogs and homepages to paintings and books will profit from the licenses.” Dr. Jan Trzaskowski adds that “the licenses make it much easier
and faster to exchange creative works, which falls perfectly in line with the vibrant cultural life in today’s Denmark”.

About Copenhagen Business School

Copenhagen Business School (CBS) has around 14,000 students and an annual intake of around 1,000 exchange students. With this number of students as well as around 400 full-time researchers and around 500 administrative employees,
CBS is the one of the 3 largest business schools in Northern Europe. The
Law Department’s aim is to maintain, develop and present research of a
high standard within the field of commercial law. Commercial law is
subject to research together with other faculty activities. For general information, visit their website.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain. Creative Commons licences provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms for authors, artists, and educators that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to offer a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. It is sustained by the generous support of various foundations including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, the Hewlett Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation as well as members of the public. For general information, visit their website.

Contact

Christiane Henckel von Donnersmarck

Executive Director, Creative Commons International, Creative Commons

Email

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PEARL JAM RELEASES ITS FIRST MUSIC VIDEO IN EIGHT YEARS UNDER A CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE

Eric Steuer, May 19th, 2006

“Life Wasted” Clip Available for Download at Google Video and PearlJam.com

May 19, 2006

Today, Creative Commons announced that the video for Pearl Jam’s new single “Life Wasted” will be offered to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-NoDerivs license, so that the people around the world can legally copy, distribute, and share the clip.

This announcement marks the first time in eight years that Pearl Jam has released a music video. It is also the first time that the band has licensed work under one of Creative Commons’ free, flexible copyright licenses.

“Once again, Pearl Jam is taking the lead, watching others in the rear view mirror,” says Lawrence Lessig, CEO of Creative Commons. “Pearl Jam’s decision to offer its new video to the public under a Creative Commons license proves that the band’s reputation for fan-friendliness is well deserved. It’s an inspiration to those of us who are passionate about building a pool of creative work that can be freely and legally shared by the world.”

Pearl Jam and J Records are offering the video as a free download at Google Video and PearlJam.com from today, May 19th, through May 24th. After May 24th, the clip will be made available for sale.

About Pearl Jam

Since the 1991 release of Pearl Jam’s multi-platinum debut album Ten, the band has sold nearly 60 million albums worldwide, including millions of live bootlegs. To date, the band has released eight studio albums, two live collections, a double-disc collection of B-sides, and a double-disc greatest hits set.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works – whether owned or in the public domain – by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation. For general information, visit creativecommons.org

Contact

Eric Steuer
Creative Director, Creative Commons
415-946-3039
Email

Creative Commons Press Kit

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David Byrne and Brian Eno’s My Life in the Bush of Ghosts Remix Site Launches Today

Eric Steuer, May 9th, 2006

May 9, 2006

For the first time ever, fans are able to legally remix and share their own personal versions of two songs from David Byrne and Brian Eno’s groundbreaking album My Life in the Bush of Ghosts. The interactive forum bush-of-ghosts.com has been developed to celebrate the reissue of the album 25 years after its original release.

By agreeing to the terms of download, users will be able to download the component audio for two tracks from Bush of Ghosts – “A Secret Life” and “Help Me Somebody.” This component audio is licensed to the public under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license. Consistent with that license, users can legally create remixes and upload them to the site. Visitors can listen to, rate, and discuss the remixes, and are also encouraged to create their own videos, which will be streamed on the site.

When My Life in the Bush of Ghosts was first released in 1981, Rolling Stone called it “an undeniably awesome feat of tape editing and rhythmic ingenuity.” It was widely considered a watershed record. The influence of My Life in the Bush of Ghosts is evident in music ranging from the Bomb Squad’s productions for Public Enemy to Moby. The re-mixed and remastered version of the album was released with 7 bonus tracks on April 11.

About Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation founded in 2001, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain—by empowering authors and audiences. It is sustained by the generous support of the Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, and the Hewlett Foundation. For general information, visit creativecommons.org.

Contact

Eric Steuer
Creative Director, Creative Commons
415-946-3039
Email

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PODCASTING LEGAL GUIDE RELEASED TO ASSIST PODCASTERS NAVIGATE POTENTIALLY TROUBLED LEGAL WATERS

Mia Garlick, May 8th, 2006

San Francisco, USA — May 8, 2006

Creative Commons and Vogele & Associates today unveiled the Podcasting Legal Guide, which was prepared by both organizations together with the invaluable assistance of the Berkman Center at Harvard Law School’s Clinical Program in Cyberlaw. The Guide was prepared as part of the Stanford Center for Internet & Society’s Non-Residential Fellowship. Inspired by the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Legal Guide for Bloggers, the Podcasting Legal Guide is designed to outline both legal and practical issues that are specifically relevant for podcasters, such as using music and video in a podcast.

The Guide has been published both online and as a PDF under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 license. A hardcopy of the Guide can also be ordered via Lulu in print-on-demand for $5.37 (black & white) or $10.83 (color). The authors hope that the flexible license chosen will enable practitioners in different jurisdictions to translate and adapt the guide for their own jurisdictions to assist podcasters around the world.

“This is an exciting time,” said Colette Vogele, founder of Vogele & Associates. “With the proliferation of user-generated and user-manipulated content on the web through podcasting and other technologies, anyone has the potential to become a publisher of original or remixed content overnight. At the same time, these new media technologies remain for the most part legally untested. We hope this Guide will encourage readers to take an active role in understanding the legal issues affecting their podcasts, and implement techniques and resources to podcast legally.”

“The body of copyright and related laws that governs the use of other people’s content in a podcast is, as Larry Lessig notes in his foreword to the Guide, ‘insanely complex,’” noted Phil Malone, co-director of the Berkman Center’s Clinical Program. “This Guide seeks to serve as a common-sense overview of some of that complexity and to help podcasters understand the variety of alternatives they might have to safely use music, video and other materials.”

To coincide with the release of the Guide, Creative Commons has released podcast promos from several prominent artists including DJ Spooky, Kristin Hersh, Jonathan Coulton, Finian Mckean, and Au Revoir Simone. These promos are available for podcasters who use CC-licensed music to include in their podcasts. Creative Commons invites other artists to submit promos for inclusion at the site.

About Vogele & Associates

Vogele & Associates advises businesses, non-profits, and individuals on a range of intellectual property issues related to new media and internet technologies. Founder Colette Vogele holds a non-residential fellowship with Stanford’s Center for Internet & Society and writes and speaks internationally on intellectually property issues.

About the Berkman Center Clinical Program in Cyberlaw

The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School is a research program founded to explore cyberspace, share in its study, and help pioneer its development. The Berkman Center’s Clinical Program in Cyberlaw provides high-quality, pro-bono legal services to appropriate individuals, small start-ups, non-profit groups and government entities regarding cutting-edge issues of the Internet, new technology and intellectual property. For information on the Center, visit the Center’s website; to learn more about the Clinical Program visit the Program’s site.

About Creative Commons

Creative Commons is a not-for-profit organization, founded in 2001, that promotes the creative re-use of intellectual and artistic works—whether owned or in the public domain. Creative Commons licences provide a flexible range of protections and freedoms for authors, artists, and educators that build upon the “all rights reserved” concept of traditional copyright to offer a voluntary “some rights reserved” approach. It is sustained by the generous support of various foundations including the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Omidyar Network Fund, the Hewlett Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation as well as members of the public. For general information, visit the Creative Commons’ website.

Contact

Colette Vogele

Vogele & Associates

415 751 5737

Email

Mia Garlick

General Counsel, Creative Commons

415 946 3073

Email

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