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2009 June

Free Software Foundation introduces RDF for GNU licenses

Mike Linksvayer, June 22nd, 2009

We’re very happy to note that the Free Software Foundation has introduced RDF for GNU licenses. This means the FSF has described each of its licenses at a high level in the same “machine readable” framework that CC uses to describe our licenses.

CC worked with the FSF to extend our vocabulary for describing copyright licenses in RDF, but it’s key to understand that no collaboration was required. They could have extended our vocabulary without asking or published their own without reference to ours, leaving it to third parties to describe mappings between the two (also using RDF). As with free software, using the semantic web means users have the freedom to innovate without asking for permission. Perhaps it is no surprise that cutting edge semantic web software tends to be free software. It feels like there may be under-exploited connections to be drawn between the free software and semantic web communities, e.g., hinted at in Evan Prodromou’s keynote at the FSF’s LibrePlanet conference, somewhat as it feels there may be under-exploited connections between the free software and free culture communities.

Less philosophically, we hope this small affordance helps others build tools which make it easier to find and use free software. For example, this list of free software hosting facilities is only the tip of the iceberg, and rapidly growing due to the rise of distributed version control systems. More project metadata will help computers help make sense of it all.

It’s also worth noting that RDF descriptions of licenses such as CC’s and now the FSF’s give users an additional tool to use to find and manage information, in contrast with Digital RightsRestrictions Management, which gives the publishers of information a tool to abuse users. For more on the latter, of course see the FSF’s Defective By Design campaign.

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CC infopacks, Government 2.0 and more from CC Australia

Mike Linksvayer, June 22nd, 2009

If you’re looking for excellent, brief, printable materials explaining various aspects of Creative Commons, check out CC Australia’s CC Infopacks. They’re also linked from our documentation wiki, and all licensed for remixing with your own course or other materials (of course).

Also congratulations to CC Australia project lead Brian Fitzgerald, Seb Chan, Head of Digital, Social and Emerging Technologies at the Powerhouse Museum, and former CC General Counsel Mia Garlick on their appointments to Australia’s Government 2.0 Taskforce.

To stay ahead of the curve, subscribe to CC Australia‘s feed (note CC AU also spearheaded our case studies project) as well as those of other CC jurisdiction projects, which you can find aggregated on Planet Creative Commons.

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Adam Curry wins again!

Mike Linksvayer, June 18th, 2009

This post is written and translated by Paul Keller of CC Netherlands, first posted in Dutch on the CC Netherlands blog earlier today. Regarding one of the quotes below, to be clear, note CC licenses do not override fair use.

Adam Curry wins again!
by Paul Keller

In 2006 Adam Curry initiated and won the first ever lawsuit centering around the use of a Creative Commons licensed work (English). Back then the Dutch gossip-mag ‘weekend’ had published photos from Curry’s flickr account without asking Curry for permission and the Amsterdam court of first instance decided that this use was explicitly prohibited by the non-commercial condition of the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license that Curry uses for his Flickr pictures.

One would assume that other gossip-mags would learn from this and refrain from using photos from Adam’s Flickr stream, but exactly that happened 2 weeks ago when ‘Privé‘ used another picture to illustrate an article without Adam permission. As in the previous case Adam immediately reacted, this time by demanding that the publisher of Privé pay him a compensation for the unauthorized use or he would take them to court. Back then Adam wrote:

Instead of taking them directly to court I added twist this time, and gave them the option of paying 5000 euros directly to the War Child Foundation and my legal costs. Failure to comply by June 2nd and I will take them to court. It’s national news, lead story on the 6:30 news and all that good stuff :)

According to a public response from the magazine’s editor, they will ‘see me in court’ as they believe they have ‘fair use’ rights because of the picture’s ‘news value’. Pretty funny coming from a gossip rag.

While the deadline set by Curry passed without an official reaction from Privé it turns out that the defiant reaction form the magazines editor was not worth the paper it was printed on. Today Adam received a mail from from his lawyers indicating that Privé has settled along the terms provided by Curry in order to avoid the court hearing that was scheduled for the 23rd of June [translation from Dutch original by Creative Commons Netherlands]:

Dear Adam,
the conflict between Telegraaf Tijdschriften Groep (“TTG”), the publishers of among others Privé and yourself has been settled in your favor.

TTG wil pay you an amount of compensation and TTG has signed a declaration (backed up by a penalty) that in the future they will no more infringe on copyrights held by Adam Curry in photos published by him on www.flickr.com. You will donate the compensation received to Warchild and STOP AIDS NOW!.

Given the above, the court hearing scheduled for the 23rd of july will not take place.

Creative Commons congratulates Adam Curry with this victory that once again illustrates that when necessary the Creative Commons licenses offer enough legal protection against unauthorized used of the licensed works. Thanks again Adam!

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Remix My Lit: Through The Clock Workings

Cameron Parkins, June 18th, 2009

through-the-clocks-workingsRemix My Lit – a Brisbane based, international remixable literature project – just released their first publication, Through the Clock’s Workings. Billed as the world’s first remixed and remixable anthology of literature, the whole project is released under a CC BY-NC-SA license and is available as a free digital download (PDF) or as a hardcopy purchase through the Sydney University Press e-store. More from CCau:

Those who have been following our blog will remember the beautifully simplistic premise of the Australia Council funded Remix My Lit project – take stories from 9 prominent Australian authors, release them for remixing under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial ShareAlike licence, and see what happens.

Through the Clock’s Workings gives us a taste of the result. Published by the Sydney University Press, this anthology brings together the original 9 stories – from authors such as James Phelan, Cate Kennedy and Kim Wilkins – with 13 of the best remixes [...] the diversity is great – there are poems, abridgements, gender switches, complete re-imaginings. Even the cover of the the book you can see above is a remix of the stories by the excellent artist Ali J.

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ccSalon SF next Wednesday (6/24/09)

Allison Domicone, June 18th, 2009

salon-sf

We hope you can join us next Wednesday for June’s ccSalon SF! We’ll be exploring the digital intersection of art, history, and culture, and how CC can play a defining role in enriching all three. Our presenters for the evening:

* Francesco Spagnolo, Director of Research and Collections at the Magnes Museum in Berkeley.
* Dave Toole, CEO and Founder, Outhink Media.
* Nancy Van House, Professor, UC Berkeley School of Information.

When: Wednesday, June 24, 7-9pm
Location: PariSoMa, 1436 Howard St. (map and directions).
The event is free and open to the public, and light refreshments will be served! More information at the ccSalon SF page of our Wiki.

Check it out on Upcoming and Facebook. We hope to see you there!

Remember, ccSalons are global events, and anyone can start one, no matter where you live. We encourage you to check out our resources for starting your own salon in your area.

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CAPL, the Culturally Authentic Pictorial Lexicon

Jane Park, June 18th, 2009

CAPL, the Culturally Authentic Pictorial Lexicon originally founded at Washington and Jefferson College in 2003, re-launches today. From the announcement email:

“CAPL is a free, online, non-commercial visual glossary comprised of authentic photos for language and cultural instruction and research. Created at Washington & Jefferson College, CAPL seeks to provide teachers and learners with high-quality authentic images for their classrooms and teaching materials. Additionally, it provides researchers in applied linguistics, visual cognition, and automated image recognition with a database of high-quality culturally authentic images they can use in their research. At the core of CAPL is the generous creative commons license.”

CAPL is based on the premise that “visual perception is culturally determined and visual cognition varies from culture to culture.” It asks the question, “Is a house really a Haus, is pain really хлеб, and when we see red cabbage, is it really red?” To find out, go check out CAPL for yourself!

All CAPL images are licensed CC BY-NC.

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11/17: Lulan Artisans Textile Competition

Cameron Parkins, June 17th, 2009

lulan

Lulan Artisans, a for-profit social venture that designs and produces high-quality, hand-woven textiles, recently launched a competition – 11˚/17˚ – to solicit community designs for Lulan’s 2010 collection.

Lulan will accept submissions until October 15th and are encouraging participants to publish their work under a CC BY-NC license and additionally make them available to independent artisans for commercial purposes and for use without attribution. The goal behind this is that the designs submitted will “populate a database of Creative Commons designs that weaving cooperatives around the world can use to increase their ability to make a sustainable living and be less at risk of poverty.”

You can learn more about the competition’s guidelines at the 11˚/17˚ website.

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Launching Inside OER, the Comic

Jane Park, June 16th, 2009

For those of you who’ve been following, ccLearn started interviewing innovative people and projects in the open education space last April, when we kicked things off with a highly informative interview of Leigh Blackall at Otago Polytechnic (the university whose default licensing policy is CC BY. Inside OER is the current culmination of our efforts, the full suite of interviews available for redistribution and remix at the ccLearn site.

Now we’ve tried something new. For our latest Inside OER, IssueLab’s Lisa Brooks on Opening Up Research, we decided to make our own adaptation, lifting the complete text of the interview and remixing it with images, screen shots, and speech bubbles. Drawing extensively from resources in the public domain, CC licensed photos on Flickr, and the help of a handy application known as Comic Life, we give you our very first issue of Inside OER, the Comic.
inside-oer-icon
Hopefully, this will not only grab but sustain short attention spans. IssueLab, in particular, is doing great things for the open education community and Lisa is especially apt at articulating exactly what that is and what they are aiming for.

The comic is licensed CC BY, of course, so share and derive away! You can also remix the text version at CC Talks With.

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CC Talks With: IssueLab’s Lisa Brooks on Opening Up Research

Jane Park, June 16th, 2009

Logo <a </code>href=
Logo by Gabi Fitz | CC BY-NC-SA

ccLearn recently spoke with Lisa Brooks from IssueLab. Instead of crossing telephone lines (who does that anymore anyway?), I caught up with her via that archaic method of correspondence known as electronic mail…*inside-oer-icon

*Similarly archaic, but not outdated in coolness factor, are comics. The first comic issue of Inside OER is this same interview in comic form. Instead of the same-old and streamlined text with interspersed pictures, we decided to experiment. Let us know what you think! For those of you on hand-held devices (or a preference for just text), read on here. Read More…

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REMINDER: CC Salon NYC / OVC Pre-party is Thursday Night (+music & beer)

Fred Benenson, June 16th, 2009

CC Salon NYC Logo
Open Video Conference

Just a reminder that the Creative Commons Salon NYC / Official Open Video Conference Pre-party is happening Thursday night!

I’m also excited to announce that we’ve added a live acoustic set from CC musician Adam McHeffey (of FrostClick fame) as well as lots of cold beer sponsored by blip.tv!

Here’s all the info:

June’s Salon will feature an in depth chat with Brett Gaylor, writer and director of RiP! A Remix Manifesto, a presentation by Erik Moeller, Deputy Director of the Wikimedia Foundation WMF on Wikipedia’s switch to Creative Commons licenses, and a live acoustic set from singer song writer Adam McHeffey.

Thursday, June 18th, from 7-10pm
For Your Imagination Loft
22 W. 27th St., 6th Floor
Between Broadway & 6th Ave.
New York, NY

We’ll have free (as in beer) beer for the reception afterward. If you’ve didn’t make it to any past CC Salons, don’t miss this one, and if you did, you’ll know to come early as space is limited.

RSVP to the event via Facebook or by e-mailing me: fred [at] creativecommons.org.

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