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2009 June

Learning Music Monthly: Issue #4 Update

Cameron Parkins, June 3rd, 2009

lmm24_hi

Learning Music Monthly, the subscription-based, album-a-month music series from L.A.-based John Wood continues to grow from its initial launch four months ago. Produced in conjunction with CC-friendly label Vosotros, the latest installment of LMM is a video album, with Wood producing music to videos from ten different LA filmmakers after their creation – an inversion of the traditional approach to music videos.

You can download (ZIP) silent versions of the films from the LMM website, stream the videos at a variety of destinations, or become a subscriber to access downloads of the videos (as well as the rest of the LMM music archive) in hi-quality formats. Subscriptions are tiered from a donation-based digital option to a $60 deluxe package and all the material is released under CC BY-NC-SA, allowing you to build upon and share the bevy of work created by LMM.

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CC Talks With: Nina Paley

Cameron Parkins, June 3rd, 2009

Nina Paley’s Sita Sings The Blues, released online a little over two months ago, has been generating great press and even greater viewership, closing in on 70,000 downloads at archive.org alone. For the non-inundated, there is great background information on the film at Paley’s website.

We recently had the opportunity to talk with Paley about the film – we touched on the film’s aesthetics and plot points, but perhaps most interesting to those in the CC community is Paley’s decision to utilize our copyleft license, Attribution-ShareAlike, and her thoughts on free licensing and the open source movement in general. Read on to learn more about the licensing trials and tribulations associated with the film’s release, how CC has played a role, and Paley’s opinions on the Free Culture movement as a whole.

Read More…

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ccNewsletter #13

Allison Domicone, June 2nd, 2009

ccNewsletter #13

Check out the latest ccNewsletter, available to download in PDF format for your reading pleasure as you catch up on the latest CC news. Note that from here out, the format of our newsletter will be changing slightly. We’ll send brief monthly e-news updates of the latest CC news, and on a quarterly basis, starting in September, we’ll produce a more comprehensive newsletter including a CEO update from Joi Ito, which will also be available in PDF format. We’ve got a lot of exciting things happening all the time, and we want to be sure to bring all of our big news to you in the most convenient way possible!

As always, thank you to our CC Philippines team for the beautiful PDF version of the newsletter. Check out all the past issues.

Stay in touch with us! Sign up to receive the newsletter via email and subscribe to our events list.

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Incentive Bill for 21st Century Skills

Jane Park, June 2nd, 2009

Last month, a bipartisan bill introduced in the U.S. Senate recognized the fact that students learning today need to be taught the necessary skills to succeed in this century—an age of new media, the Internet, and ever evolving technologies. The bill, introduced by Senator John D. Rockefeller IV, would “create a new incentive fund that will encourage States to adopt the 21st Century Skills Framework.” The fund would provide federal matches to those states that integrate the teaching of 21st century skills such as “creativity, innovation, critical thinking and financial, economic, business and entrepreneurial literacy” into core curricula, according to the Partnership for 21st Century Skills.

eSchool News reports what Shelley Pasnik, “director of the Education Development Center’s Center for Children and Technology,” has to say:

“The legislation goes beyond technology. It’s about implementing a framework for 21st-century learning,” she said. “It’s more promising this way. If it were just about technology purchases, it would be a missed opportunity.”

We couldn’t agree more. Giving a student a computer won’t teach him or her how to use one, but integrating activities that require the use of one will. More broadly, students will learn the relevant skills to succeed in the current day and future when core curriculum is revamped to include current day and future projects. Revamped curriculum and associated learning materials will also only achieve maximum impact if the resources are open for use and iteration. Opening up the resources makes the federal investment worthwhile, and is helpful for states that are slow in jumping on the bandwagon to catch up. It also gives extra incentive for high quality materials, as competition turns to collaboration between states.

You can read the full text of the proposed bill here.

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2nd CC Community Call (5/27/09) recording now online

Allison Domicone, June 1st, 2009

We hosted our second community conference call last Wednesday, May 27. Donors were invited to join members of CC’s staff and board, including CEO Joi Ito and new Board Chair Esther Wojcicki, to discuss organizational updates, including CC Zero, GreenXchange, the future of the CC Network, and an update on the Wikipedia migration to CC BY-SA. We also took questions and comments from participants. The call was a great success and a valuable opportunity to reach out to and connect with our supporters; we will continue to host community conference calls on a quarterly basis, and anyone giving $250 or more will be invited to take part.

An audio recording of the call is now available online. Thanks to everyone who participated, and as always, we would like to extend a big thank you to all members of our community for your continued support!

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PALM Africa Releases “Genocide by Denial” Under CC License

Cameron Parkins, June 1st, 2009

PALM Africa, an African CC-based publishing project, just released their first open-access book from AIDS specialist Peter Mugyenyi titled, Genocide by Denial: How profiteering from HIV/AIDS killed millions. The book is being released under a CC BY-NC-ND license making it free to download and share. PALM is using the release to test the impact open access initiatives have on book sales but, as noted by Eve Gray, there is another reason this license choice is so important (emphasis added):

The timing is impeccable, as the release of the open access version of the book coincides exactly with a breakthrough at the World Health Organisation, which has finally reached agreement on a global strategy and plan of action on public health, innovation and intellectual property [...] Among the recommendations in the WHO plan of action is government intervention to ensure voluntary sharing or research, open access publication repositories and open databases and compound libraries of medical research results. Thus Fountain’s engagement with open access publishing on a public health topic is right in line with – and ahead of – developing global policy.

PALM and Mugyenyi’s license choice thus becomes a practice in the very lessons they are attempting to teach. Beyond this, Gray argues that “Mugyenyi’s book needs to be read by the South African bureaucrats who are trying to enforce widespread and rigid commercialization of public research”, a task that while difficult, is made easier due to the free sharing encouraged by their license choice.

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