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Creative Commons Expands To The Middle East With AGIP

Matt Haughey, March 26th, 2004

Abu-Ghazaleh Intellectual Property (AGIP) is the first to bring the International Commons (iCommons) project to the Middle East.

Palo Alto, USA, and Amman, JORDAN – March 25, 2004 – Creative Commons, a non-profit corporation dedicated to building a body of creative works free for copying and re-use, announced today that it would expand its International Commons (iCommons) project in Jordan and the Middle East. AGIP, the leading provider of intellectual property services in the Arab region, will lead this effort.

Professor Lawrence Lessig, Chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at Stanford University, in the U.S., said: “We’re very excited to have AGIP lead iCommons project in Jordan. AGIP’s participation is crucial to our growing effort in promoting the international cultural commons.”

Mr. Charles Shaban, executive director of AGIP’s Regional Office said, “We are very pleased to be the first Arab country to bring the International Commons to this region and we hope that this project will be a step forward towards building the digital commons in cyberspace.”

Meanwhile, Mr. Rami Olwan, an e-commerce legal consultant and project lead for iCommons in Jordan stated, “The international Creative Commons project is unique in the sense that it offers new concepts to the current copyright legal system.”

Announced in March 2003, iCommons is Creative Commons’ project to make its machine-readable copyright licenses useful worldwide. As the lead institution for Jordan, AGIP will coordinate a public effort to translate the Creative Commons licenses literally and legally for use there. Jordan joins Australia, Brazil, Catalonia, China, Croatia, Finland, France, Ireland, Japan, Spain, Taiwan, and the United Kingdom in this effort.

AGIP will field comments relating to their specific initiatives in archived email discussions on the Creative Commons website at:

http://creativecommons.org/discuss#/jordan

More about Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or in the public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School (U.S.), where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

For more information about iCommons, see http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

More about AGIP

Abu-Ghazaleh Intellectual Property (AGIP) is a pioneering firm in intellectual property protection in the Arab world and today remains the region’s leader in this field. When AGIP was established in 1972 under the name TMP Agents, intellectual property protection was in its infancy in the Arab region. Legislation was weak and few foreign companies attempted to protect their intellectual property in the region.

The situation has changed dramatically over the last 3 decades and AGIP today is the largest IP firm in the Arab world, managing the protection of nearly half of the global Fortune 500 firms among many others. As Arab nations have developed, they have rapidly increased the legal protections applicable to intellectual property and have continued to work on increasing the effectiveness of enforcement of IP laws. AGIP has consistently been at the forefront of efforts to improve the infrastructure of Arab intellectual property protection.

It has always been the most generous Arab contributor to regional and global intellectual property associations and has worked in close coordination with Arab governments and multilateral governmental organizations such as WIPO to improve the climate for intellectual property protection.

Operating from its headquarters in Amman, Jordan, AGIP has offices in every major Arab city with liaison offices in Europe, UK, Canada and the USA.

For more information about AGIP, please visit:

http://www.agip.com

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin, Germany)
iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons
christiane@creativecommons.org

Rami Olwan (Ammam, Jordan)
Project Lead, iCommons Jordan
rolwan@tagi.com

Glenn Otis Brown (Palo Alto, USA)
Executive Director, Creative Commons
glenn@creativecommons.org

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Creative Commons expands to Australia with Queensland University of Technology (QUT)

Matt Haughey, March 25th, 2004

Queensland University of Technology (QUT) will lead the license translation and work to expand global access to Australia’s culture

Palo Alto, USA, and Brisbane, AUSTRALIA – March 25, 2004 – Creative Commons, a nonprofit dedicated to building a body of creative works free for copying and re-use, announced today that it would expand its International Commons (iCommons) project to Australia.

Queensland University of Technology (QUT), in Brisbane, will lead the effort.

First announced in March 2003, iCommons is Creative Commons’ project to make its machine-readable copyright licenses useful worldwide.

As the lead institution, QUT will coordinate a public effort to translate the Creative Commons licenses literally and legally for use in Australia.

“We are thrilled to be working with Queensland University of Technology,” said Lawrence Lessig, Chairman of Creative Commons and professor of law at Stanford University, in the U.S. “Australia will be a vital participant in bringing the international cultural Commons to fruition.”

“We are also excited to be involved in developing Creative Commons in Australia,” explained Project Co-Leader Brian Fitzgerald, Professor and Head of the School of Law at QUT. “There is already strong demand within the Australian community for a legal means of facilitating the distribution of Open Content, and Creative Commons will be a tremendous platform on which to build these protocols and agreements.”

Tom Cochrane, Project Co-Leader and Deputy Vice Chancellor at QUT, said that with copyright law and regulation getting more attention by the day, QUT was pleased to be associated with this international effort to find collaborative solutions more appropriate to rapidly changing digital environments.

“Even within the University, there are already numerous direct applications of the model in our day to day academic work,” Mr Cochrane said.

QUT will field comments on an archived email discussion at the Creative Commons website, http://www.creativecommons.org/discuss#australia.

Australia joins Brazil, China, Croatia, Finland, France, Ireland, Japan, Spain, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, and Jordan in the iCommons effort.

More about Creative Commons

A nonprofit corporation, Creative Commons promotes the creative re-use of intellectual works, whether owned or in the public domain. It is sustained by the generous support of The Center for the Public Domain, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation. Creative Commons is based at Stanford Law School, where it shares staff, space, and inspiration with the school’s Center for Internet and Society.

For general information, visit http://creativecommons.org.

For more information about iCommons, see http://creativecommons.org/projects/international/.

More about Queensland University of Technology

QUT is a major Australian university with a strong interest in and commitment to information law and policy. As well as its large Law Faculty, QUT is also home to the Faculty of Creative Industries, which is keen to utilize the Creative Commons model to further develop innovation in the creative industries; the Faculty of Information Technology, which is a leader in information security; and the Faculty of Business, which has recognized expertise in technology policy and innovation.

QUT’s partner in this exercise has been Ian Oi and his team at Blake Dawson Waldron Lawyers. Ian Oi is a recognized expert in Technology and Intellectual Property Issues and plays an active role in the development of law and policy in this area.

For more information about QUT, visit http://www.qut.edu.au.
For more information about Blake Dawson Waldron Lawyers, visit http://www.bdw.com.au.

Contact

Christiane Asschenfeldt (Berlin)
iCommons Coordinator, Creative Commons
christiane@creativecommons.org

Professor Brian Fitzgerald (Brisbane)
Project Lead, iCommons Australia
Head of School of Law, Queensland University of Technology
email: bf.fitzgerald@qut.edu.au

Glenn Otis Brown
Executive Director (Palo Alto)
glenn@creativecommons.org

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Free Culture released

Matt Haughey, March 25th, 2004

Creative Commons chairman Lawrence Lessig has just released his new book, Free Culture today, both online as a licensed downloadable PDF and in stores. The book covers the current state of copyright law and what it means to our culture and society. Give it a look, and if you like what you see, ordering online will contribute a small percentage of this organization.

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Full-Time Intimacy

Glenn Otis Brown, March 25th, 2004

The Berkman Center’s Mary Bridges and Benjamen Walker — the sound designer behind Creative Commons’ animations — recently produced an audio postcard for NPR on the SXSW Interactive conference. It’s subtly funny, and a nice self-exemplifying piece of, and about, instant bricolage media. (Listen closely for the voices of Creative Commons board member Joi Ito and Mediarights.org tech chief and Fourth Wall Films panelist David Jacobs.)

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Liberation (France)

Press Robot, March 24th, 2004

Trois Questions a Glenn Otis Brown,” by Marie Lechner.

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SoundShelf.com offers CC for music

Neeru Paharia, March 24th, 2004

SoundShelf.com hosts free music of various genres and makes it all available under the EFF Open Audio License, or a Creative Commons license. This was taken directly from their FAQ:

2. When is free music legal?

Free music is legal when the artists want it to be. Until recently it was near impossible to know the artist’s feelings and intentions as all works were automatically copyrighted. Today with the emergence of the Creative Commons License and the EFF Open Audio License the artist’s desired intentions are expressed by the license that they choose to publish their works under.

I particulary liked this track No More by Neoismo, a group based out of Italy. It’s under an Attribution-ShareAlike license so you can even remix it!

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Biomed Central using Creative Commons

Matt Haughey, March 23rd, 2004

Biomed Central, a publishing house offering free access to over 100 journals of peer-reviewed biomedical research, has recently adopted the Attribution license on all their submissions.

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Pay to license working with Creative Commons

Matt Haughey, March 23rd, 2004

One-man band Brad Sucks recently signed with Magnatune and licensed all his tracks under Creative Commons (and began selling them on a sliding scale on Magnatune’s site).

We were delighted to hear that Brad’s song “Making Me Nervous” was recently licensed for use in radio ads and TV ads that played in Canada. Thanks in part to Magnatune’s tiered licensing system, record-at-home musicians like Brad have found other ways to make a living from their music by selling commercial licenses. It’s a great example of the common sense approach Magnatune takes to commercial licensing that also allows for free sharing and listening by fans. Congrats, Brad and Magnatune!

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Roger McGuinn of the Byrds uses Music Sharing License

Neeru Paharia, March 23rd, 2004

Legendary musician Roger McGuinn of the Byrds is using the new Creative Commons Music Sharing License for all the songs in his Folkden project. You can see the Share Music tag at the bottom of each song’s page, as it’s displayed here for the song Delia’s Gone. Roger builds upon a rich heritage of public domain songs even further by opening up his own sound recordings for sharing. On the site, Roger discusses how folk music lives through the process of sharing.

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CC Remix Music — Jammin on the Net, and Holland Hopson

Neeru Paharia, March 23rd, 2004

Last featured on CC Remix Music was Funktifyno, a great fusion jam band based in Oregon. Chris Morris, based in Texas, read our blog and turned their song Funkberry Jam into Funkberrymo Jam by adding a keyboard track– how’s that for jamming on the Net?

Today we are featuring Holland Hopson’s song Cuckoo, a peaceful and melodic flow on the saxophone. Though thorougly beautiful in its current state, it lends itself to the potential of an added drum beat, possibly changing the spirit of the song entirely — care to remix?

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