Audio

Remix Georgia Wonder via Mixable

Fred Benenson, February 23rd, 2009

georgiawonderGeorgia Wonder, the UK band who made headlines earlier this year for encouraging their fans to share their music, is participating in this year’s annual MIXABLE contest to support UK schools. The band has made the separated audio tracks from their song “Girl You Never Knew” available for download in both WAV and AIFF files and available under our Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license:

Whoever comes up with the best version as chosen by the band will get to work further on the track in a full studio, and this new version will then be featured on an upcoming release with full production and performing credits!

Check out the site for more information and the details for starting your remix!

1 Comment »

MuseumPods Launches Creative Commons License Functionality

Fred Benenson, February 19th, 2009

Podcast Survey Excerpt

You’ll recall that we did a survey in collaboration with MuseumPods back in November asking basic questions about podcasting, MuseumPods, and Creative Commons.

We’ve decided to release a summary of the results from the survey as one big PNG file (785px × 5080px, 170kb). This file was created using the Summary function of Google Doc’s Form/Spreadsheet and contains a sampling of some of the long form data entered into the spread sheet, as well as plenty of pretty graphs and charts detailing the breakdown in responses that we received. Though by no means scientific, the data is still worth a look if you’re interested in talking about CC with your community.

More importantly, however, is that MuseumPods has incorporated CC licenses into their FeedMe product. FeedMe allows anyone to create a podcast feed for free, and now creators can choose what CC license they want to apply to their podcast. Sign up for FeedMe here, read our podcasting guide, and start podcasting with CC today!

1 Comment »

Commercially Licensed Music from Jamendo Pro

Fred Benenson, February 19th, 2009

Jamendo, the CC-only music store and community has launched Jamendo Pro for those seeking commercial music:

Jamendo pro offers event organizers an alternative to collective rights societies (ASCAP, MCPS, SOCAN…), which allows you to save the fees they apply, while enjoying a quality music catalog available by online streaming.

Jamendo Pro
Jamendo will also provide you with a certificate guaranteeing you do not have to pay any copyright fees. Check out the the respective pages for background music, public event music, music for audiovisual works, and music for websites and blogs.

Comments Off

Help Portishead Find a New Business Model

Cameron Parkins, February 17th, 2009

2101339030_b5c7dc19d1
portishead @ atp, obo-bobolina | CC BY-NC

Portishead, an experimental-pop group and pioneers of the early 90s electronica movement, announced yesterday that they are now “free agents”, having completed their three record deal with Island Records. The band is looking at new ways to sell their music and are reaching out to their fans for advice:

with the world being the way it is there are lots of options open……but if you lot have any bright ideas of how we should sell our music in the future lets us know , why not!

i dont think that were into giving out music away for free to be honest…it […] takes ages to write and we have to heat our swimming pools…..!!!

While Portishead mention an aversion to giving away music for free, our thoughts immediately turned to a CC+ licensing model similar to what Nine Inch Nails used in marketing Ghosts I-IV and The Slip this past year. NIN gave away their music for free under a CC BY-NC-SA license, but they also found immediate and substantial financial return as well as seeing their long-term sales flourish.

NIN achieved this by selling different versions of the same content; there was the initial free download of the first nine tracks of Ghosts, but fans could also purchase a $5 download of the whole album, a $10 2xCD set, a $75 DVD box set, and finally, a limited edition $300 ultra-deluxe box set signed and numbered by Trent himself, all of it CC licensed. Given the notoriety of Portishead fans, something tells us that if the band were to offer a $300 unreleased album in an ultra-deluxe box set in conjunction with freely licensed versions of the same music, it would probably sell out just as quick as NIN’s 2,500 copies did.

So let Portishead know that there are indeed ways to make money while giving music away for free – its all about connecting with their fans via CC, and giving them an easy way to support the band.

10 Comments »

Australian public broadcaster releases first material under CC

Michelle Thorne, February 17th, 2009

From CC Australia:

A couple of days ago the [Australian Broadcasting Corporation’s] excellent collaborative media site, Pool, posted a recording of genetics professor Steve Jones talking about Darwin’s life and work under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial licence. As far as we’re aware, this is the very first time material from the ABC archives has been released under a Creative Commons licence.

And this is just the beginning. Pool plans to release a whole series of ABC archival materials for remixing as part of its its Gene Pool project.

We’re all very excited here at CCau. The ABC has, almost without question, the largest historical audiovisual archive in Australia. Just think what we can do with it.

We’re excited as well. Last year we conducted a round-up of broadcasters implementing CC, and twelve months later, with exemplary license usage by Al Jazeera and now ABC’s Pool project, it seems the broadcasting world is poised for more. Stay tuned and enjoy exploring the remixable, high-quality material.

Comments Off

NIN case study video: Connect with Fans + Reason to Buy

Mike Linksvayer, February 6th, 2009

Techdirt’s Mike Masnick gave a great case study lecture on Nine Inch Nails’ music business successes at MidemNet last month. He describes the “formula” as:

Connect With Fans (CwF) + Reason To Buy (RtB) = The Business Model ($$$$)

Toward the end of the video he explains CwF also means “Compete with Free” and RtB means “Return to Business” as an alternative to prosecuting fans.

Offering creative work under a CC license (as NIN has done with its last two albums) is a way to powerfully signal an intention to connect with fans and that the creator has returned to business. This doesn’t absolve a creator from the need to provide interesting reasons to buy that compete with (or perhaps rather complement) free, which NIN has done in spades.

Another good point Masnick makes at the end of the presentation is that the model works for large and small creators. A few years ago, often I’d hear people comment that tools like CC licensing were only useful for artists that weren’t well known and needed to take extreme measures to promote their works. Ironically, more recently, and especially following NIN’s successes, I see comments that open music can only work for bands that already have a rabid fan base. Obviously both can’t be true, and it turns out neither is. See some of Masnick’s previous posts on open music business models (here’s a recent one with lots of links back) for more.

If Masnick’s lecture inspires you as an artist to try the model, go for it — for additional inspiration check out Jonathan Coulton’s letter for CC’s recent campaign (because he writes eloquently about how essentially the model Masnick describes has worked for him, not because he’s asking for donations to CC, though you can make those too). If you’re inspired to help document and explain successful applications of the model, we’d love for you to help expand the CC case studies project, which is going to get much bigger this spring.

Comments Off

CC on BeyondTheBook podcast and at UGCX conference

Mike Linksvayer, February 2nd, 2009

The latest Beyond The Book podcast (mp3) features an interview with CC staff Mike Linksvayer and Melissa Reeder. The two main themes discussed are the intersection of public sharing under CC licenses and alternative private arrangements (see our post on Ozmo, a service that enables both, discussed on the podcast) and the upcoming UGCX conference.

Melissa Reeder will speak on a panel titled Sharing, Selling and Defending Photos Online at the conference, February 10 in San Jose, California.

Conference attendees intrigued by what Melissa has to say can make the trip up to San Francisco the next evening (February 11) for our CC Salon SF!

Addendum: Those in San Jose looking for even more CC info, and soon, you’re in luck. Thursday evening (February 5) Mike is presenting Open Licensing 101: How to Get the Most Out of Your Copyrights in the Information Age, hosted by California Lawyers for the Arts.

Comments Off

Koblo: Online Music Collaboration

Cameron Parkins, February 2nd, 2009

logoKoblo is a new online music collaboration site that utilizes CC licensing on tracks and song stems to promote community remixing and reuse. Uniquely, Koblo exists beyond the web in the form of Koblo Studio, a free and opensource software DAW that has the ability to upload projects to Koblo’s community site with all the tracks prepped and ready for remixing. It is during this upload process that a CC license can be chosen for the project.

By offering a platform that exists not only as open source software but also allows for CC licensing of material, Koblo has set an exemplary model for their community to follow as it grows in regards to the sharing of content. Related is the Koblo Shop, an online store that will allow community members to sell their remix packs, plugins, loops, and beats in the coming months – the store is already live with preliminary content, including a CC BY-NC-SA licensed remix pack from Sweedish pop band Ace of Base.

Koblo joins an ever growing list of great online music platforms that are enabling unintended and unique collaboration through the use of new technologies and the permissive licensing allowed by CC licenses.

Comments Off

Indaba Music on Colbert Report Tonight

Fred Benenson, February 2nd, 2009


Following up Lawrence Lessig’s remix-tastic appearance on the Colbert Report earlier in January, Indaba Music‘s Dan Zaccagnino will be chatting with Stephen tonight about Indaba’s remix and online collaboration community. If you’re looking to create your own Colbert remix or just listen to some more, head over to the page on Indaba Music that is hosting CC licensed audio samples from the show.

The Colbert Report airs on Comedy Central at 11:30pm / 10:30c but will be available tomorrow to watch online.

5 Comments »

Rock Proper Release Jitney’s 86-300, CC BY-NC Licensed Album

Cameron Parkins, January 26th, 2009

20090126_24

Chicago-based record label Rock Proper just added another impressive notch to their discography with today’s release of Jitney’s 86-300. The work of musician Casey Meehan, 86-300 is released under a CC BY-NC license, making the experimental rock songs therein freely sharable/remixable as long as Jitney is properly attributed and reuses are noncommercial in intent.

This is the second featured release from Rock Proper, who previously put out Jay Bennett’s CC-licensed Whatever Happened I Apologize. Of interest to those in the CC community is a remix from artist Fabakis who took Bennett’s stripped down I’ll Decorate My Love and transformed it into a song complete with drums, organ, electric guitar/bass, piano, and a slew of instrumental treats. All of this was legal and encouraged through the album’s CC BY-NC license, and if comment sections are to be trusted, might even result in an unexpected collaboration between the two artists in teh future.

Comments Off


Page 4 of 10« First...234567...Last »