Images

Brooklyn Museum’s API

Fred Benenson, March 6th, 2009

Brooklyn Museum In case it weren’t evidenced by their participation in Wikipedia Loves Art, The Brooklyn Museum is an institution that simply “gets it.On Tuesday, they launched an API.

The Brooklyn Museum Collection API consists of a set of methods that return structured data and links to images from the museum’s collections. This is particularly exciting since all of the images owned by Brooklyn Museum are licensed under our Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerviatives license.

To get an idea of what can be created based on their API take a look at this clever example of an interactive time line of objects in the catalog ranging from 4010 B.C.E. to now.

Piotr Adamczyk has already created a simple set of Yahoo! Pipes that allow anyone to execute the basic API functions without having to write their own code.

Keep up the great work Brooklyn Museum!

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CC Q&A and the joy of being reused

Mike Linksvayer, February 8th, 2009

We mentioned late last year that Jeremy Keith’s CC BY licensed photo was used in the film Iron Man. While that was particularly notable, Jeremy is a prolific user of CC licenses for his photos and other materials, garnering many reuses. A graphic design student asked him a series of 15 questions about CC. He blogged the answers, which are well worth reading. Here’s the lead in:

I’ve found that releasing my Flickr pictures under a Creative Commons licence has been very rewarding. My pictures have been used in all sorts of places and most people are kind enough to drop me a line and let me know when they use one of my photos. Say, for example, that the site More Than Living wanted to illustrate the article entitled What is a manbag? with a very fetching picture of Richard.

Go read the rest.

Uwe Hermann (who we’ve mentioned in the past as a curator of CC licensed music) also just posted about reuse of his photos:


Sugar / Uwe Hermann / CC BY-SA

Even with my humble, and not really widely-known little photoblog, you can already see the Creative Commons license’s effects on media sharing and remixing/reusing kick in. Quite a number of my photos have already been used by other people for various different purposes (blogs posts, articles, even album covers), including some of the “bigger” sites such as the Wall Street Journal Blog or Cult of Mac

Read Uwe’s whole post.

Even some of my mediocre photos have been reused, and I admit to getting a small kick out of it.

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Wikipedia Loves Art Launches this Weekend

Fred Benenson, February 6th, 2009

Following up the success of Wikis Take Manhattan, a new project, Wikipedia Loves Art is launching this weekend:

Wikipedia Loves Art is a scavenger hunt and free content photography contest among museums and cultural institutions worldwide, and aimed at illustrating Wikipedia articles. The event is planned to run for the whole month of February 2009. Although there are planned events at each location, you can go on your own at any time during the month.

I had the opportunity to chat with Wikipedia’s founder and CC board member, Jimmy Wales about why Wikipedia Loves Art is so important. Check out the video on blip.tv (apologies for the lack of professional lighting).

Jimmy Wales on Wikipedia Loves ArtThe project is coordinated by the Brooklyn Museum, with the participation of the Carnegie Museum of Art, the Film Society of Lincoln Center, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, the Houston Museum of Natural Science, the Hunter Museum of American Art, the Indianapolis Museum of Art, The Jewish Museum (New York), the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the New York Historical Society, the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Taft Museum of Art, the Victoria and Albert Museum. In all, there are 15 different museums and cultural institutions participating.

Sign up and go have fun helping the public domain grow on Wikipedia!

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Digital Foundations, CC-Licensed Media Design Instruction

Cameron Parkins, December 22nd, 2008

Digital Foundations: Intro to Media Design with the Adobe Creative Suite is a new book that aims to teach the principles of Bauhaus design and its relation to modern software, Adobe’s Creative Suite in particular:

Digital Foundations uses formal exercises of the Bauhaus to teach the Adobe Creative Suite. All students of digital design and production—whether learning in a classroom or on their own—need to understand the basic principles of design in order to implement them using current software. Far too often design is left out of books that teach software for the trade and academic markets. Consequently, the design software training exercise is often a lost opportunity for visual learning. Digital Foundations reinvigorates software training by integrating Bauhaus formal design exercises inspired by the history of art and design into tutorials fusing design fundamentals and core Adobe Creative Suite methodologies. The result is a cohesive learning experience.

The book is being released under a CC BY-NC-SA license and is available for free in wiki format (also available for purchase here). This license choice not only keeps the content open and shareable, but is also a “first for AIGA Design Press, New Riders, and Peachpit, and the result of 9 months of negotiation” (via Boing Boing).

Digital Foundations‘ authors, xtine burrough and Michael Mandiberg, have posted their musings on copyright, the public domain, and Creative Commons on the Digital Founation’s blog through out the book’s creation. Similarly, we would be remiss if we failed to mention that while the book focuses on Adobe’s Creative Suite, the design principles taught therein are equally applicable to open-source design tools such as GIMP and Inkscape.

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Brooklyn Museum Licenses Works Under CC

Cameron Parkins, December 17th, 2008


Egypt: Looking out to Sea, Port Said | The Commons: Brooklyn Museum Collection

Our new affinity for micro-blogging has been a huge success so far, allowing us to engage with those in the CC community in a more personal and exciting manner. One of the biggest rewards is that we are finding out about a bevy of cool projects using CC that would have otherwise slipped under our radar.

This tweet by The Brooklyn Museum got our particular interest – everything they hold the copyright to is released under a CC BY-NC-ND license, allowing for free sharing of their content. This should come as no surprise considering their contribution to Flickr: The Commons (joined today by the New York Public Library) and their new “socially networked museum membership”, 1st fans, but is an inspiring choice nonetheless.

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The National September 11th Memorial Museum Implements CC

Fred Benenson, December 15th, 2008

On Friday December 5th, the National September 11 Memorial & Museum launched its Artists Registry. The registry provides a virtual gallery of art created in response to the attacks of September 11, and includes contributions made by a diverse artistic community using varied media – visual, tactile and auditory. Most excitingly from CC’s perspective is that the registry offers full support of our 6 licenses. When uploading a work artists have the option to select a license and the work’s resulting metadata and RDFa will be displayed when the it is shown in the online galleries.

Not only has National September 11th Memorial Museum encouraged user submissions into its collection, but by using our licenses, it has done so in a progressive and socially responsible fashion. We look forward to seeing more institutions like the Memorial Museum integrating CC into their mission and offerings, so it is great to see such an innovative implementation leading the pack.

Click here to read the museum’s full press release (PDF warning) about the launch, or just head over to the registry to check it out now.

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Create Digital Music Winter 2008 Guide

Cameron Parkins, December 15th, 2008


White On Black LCD by William’s Photos | CC BY-NC

Create Digital Music, a fantastic blog on innovations in music technology/performance, recently published their Winter 2008 Guide featuring interviews, reviews, and of course photos of new trends in music production.

The guide is being published as a free PDF download and paperback book and is released under a CC BY-SA license. Not only is the guide approved for free cultural works, but it does an excellent job pooling free-to-use CC-licensed images and providing proper attribution back to these images through out its pages.

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Iron Man and the Right Not to Be Attributed

Fred Benenson, December 2nd, 2008

When Jeremy Keith, a web developer living and working in England took a photo of at Cape Canaveral and posted it to Flickr under our Attribution license (which seems to be the flavor of the month around here), he had no idea it was eventually going to end up in the blockbuster feature film Iron Man.

After explaining the terms of the CC license to a studio representative interested in using the photo in the film, Jeremy was told that it would costs at least $1500 to be attributed in the credits. So the studio offered the next best thing in lieu of being attributed properly: cash. But Jeremy turned the money down and just signed the license release anyway.

Besides being another example of Hollywood utilizing CC licensed material, this story offers insight into why we developed the CC+ protocol. CC+ is designed to help creators negotiate rights outside the scope of the license. For a lot of cases, this turns out to be our NonCommercial provision — that is, musicians offer their music to their fans under NC and use CC+ to point commercial users to a 3rd party rights broker (like Magnatune) that handles commercial rights negotiation on behalf of the artist. But here we can see another right being negotiated, that of attribution, which shows just how flexible CC licenses are.

Remember, when you’re the creator and owner of a copyrighted work, you have ultimate say over who does what with your work; CC licenses merely help you negotiate the thicket of what that “what” is.

Thanks go to Jeremy for writing up such an important example of CC licensed works being used in the wild.

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Dopplr Launches Autogenerated City Profiles

Fred Benenson, December 1st, 2008

The team at the travel community Dopplr has launched an autogenerative tool that magically creates city profiles utilizinginteresting” Flickr photos licensed under our free licenses.

Dopplr has aggregated thousands of travelers data and photos to create compelling pages that have autogenerated content. These pages expose fascinating trends of travelers visiting different cities. Take a look at Black Rock City’s profile:

The spike is from the famous Burning Man festival that happens at the end of the summer, and the photo is from brainsik’s flickr.

By utilizing our Attribution and Attribution-ShareAlike licenses, Dopplr has effectively avoided the transaction costs typically associated with negotiating rights to use a photo in a derivative work.

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ESO CC-Licensed Photo and Video

Cameron Parkins, November 21st, 2008


The Carina nebula by ESO | CC BY

The European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (ESO) is a group that “builds and operates a suite of the world’s most advanced ground-based astronomical telescopes.” With those telescopes they produce some absolutely amazing photographs and videos, all of which are released under a CC BY license. Check out their visual of the week for some particularly stunning photographs.

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