The Slip

CC Case Studies: What are the latest?

Michelle Thorne, June 16th, 2009

One month in to the revamped CC Case Studies project, and you might be curious to hear how it’s going. For starters, there have been some brilliant new submissions, the most compelling of which will be included in upcoming publications and research. We’re still collecting more user-submitted studies, so hop over to our wiki and add YOUR story!

Here’s a taste of what’s available:

remixhome

UC Berkeley shares with us their open archaeology experiment, Remixing Çatalhöyük. This innovative project interprets archaeological excavations from a 9,000-year-old settlement mound of Çatalhöyük in central Turkey, and it employs Creative Commons licensing to encourage academics and students alike to explore and remix their data sets and multimedia.

UrbanMinistry.org has written to us about a unique case study on how they use Creative Commons licenses to better deliver online faith-based materials and social services to under-resourced communities.

silviao

A submission by Linux Outlaws demonstrates how their freely licensed content created “a vibrant and active community of listeners and fans.” The show’s producers write that the “surprising success of the show would never have been possible without the ability, and explicit encouragement, to share the content freely in every way possible.”

There are of course a number of “classic” CC studies to browse, such as the well-detailed account of the Nine Inch Nails release, The Slip, and the award-winning citizen media platform Global Voices Online. A few people also have begun writing non-English case studies, for example one about Berlin’s CC-music-only bar, Breipott, or the Colombian singer Silvia O.

The CC Case Studies are a growing and community-driven resource. The stories are as powerful as the information that supports them, so we welcome you to take a moment and share with us why YOU use CC and how. The more data you can provide about your work, the better.

Comments Off

Help Portishead Find a New Business Model

Cameron Parkins, February 17th, 2009

2101339030_b5c7dc19d1
portishead @ atp, obo-bobolina | CC BY-NC

Portishead, an experimental-pop group and pioneers of the early 90s electronica movement, announced yesterday that they are now “free agents”, having completed their three record deal with Island Records. The band is looking at new ways to sell their music and are reaching out to their fans for advice:

with the world being the way it is there are lots of options open……but if you lot have any bright ideas of how we should sell our music in the future lets us know , why not!

i dont think that were into giving out music away for free to be honest…it [...] takes ages to write and we have to heat our swimming pools…..!!!

While Portishead mention an aversion to giving away music for free, our thoughts immediately turned to a CC+ licensing model similar to what Nine Inch Nails used in marketing Ghosts I-IV and The Slip this past year. NIN gave away their music for free under a CC BY-NC-SA license, but they also found immediate and substantial financial return as well as seeing their long-term sales flourish.

NIN achieved this by selling different versions of the same content; there was the initial free download of the first nine tracks of Ghosts, but fans could also purchase a $5 download of the whole album, a $10 2xCD set, a $75 DVD box set, and finally, a limited edition $300 ultra-deluxe box set signed and numbered by Trent himself, all of it CC licensed. Given the notoriety of Portishead fans, something tells us that if the band were to offer a $300 unreleased album in an ultra-deluxe box set in conjunction with freely licensed versions of the same music, it would probably sell out just as quick as NIN’s 2,500 copies did.

So let Portishead know that there are indeed ways to make money while giving music away for free – its all about connecting with their fans via CC, and giving them an easy way to support the band.

10 Comments »

Nine Inch Nails’ CC-licensed album nominated for a Grammy Award

Eric Steuer, December 5th, 2008

This week, the Grammy Awards nominations were announced – and, for the first time, a Creative Commons-licensed track and album are on the list. Nine Inch Nails’ “34 Ghosts IV” is nominated for Best Rock Instrumental Performance, while the album that track appears on, Ghosts I-IV, is up for Best Boxed Or Special Limited Edition Package.

This year, NIN released both Ghosts I-IV and a second album, The Slip, under a CC BY-NC-SA license. Both albums were downloaded for free and shared legally millions of times by fans under the terms of this license. At the same time, NIN found great financial success in selling cool, well-crafted, limited edition physical editions of both sets. Back in March, Wired said the band made $1.6 million on Ghosts I-IV in its first week of release alone.

Additionally, Radiohead’s song “House of Cards” is up for several Grammys, including Best Short Form Music Video. The video’s animation data was released under a CC BY-NC-SA license earlier this year (see previous post).

Congratulations to Nine Inch Nails and Radiohead for the nominations. Also, congratulations to all of the other artists whose work was nominated for Grammys this year, including Brian Eno, Diplo, Danger Mouse and Cee-Lo (AKA Gnarls Barkley), My Morning Jacket, Gilberto Gil, Peter Gabriel, Thievery Corporation, and Cornelius – all of whom have used Creative Commons licenses and/or have supported CC over the years.

2 Comments »


Subscribe to RSS

Archives

  • collapse2014
  • expand2013
  • expand2012
  • expand2011
  • expand2010
  • expand2009
  • expand2008
  • expand2007
  • expand2006
  • expand2005
  • expand2004
  • expand2003
  • expand2002