Weblog

2006 November

Cursive and Saddle Creek present: “Bad Sects” Remix Contest

Eric Steuer, November 10th, 2006

The very awesome indie rock band Cursive is currently hosting the “Bad Sects” Remix Contest. Visit the contest site to download the CC-licensed audio stems for the song “Bad Sects” (from the group’s new album, Happy Hollow. Then use those tracks, along with your own music, to create a remix. Submit your best work to the band’s label, Saddle Creek, for a chance to have your remix used as the b-side of an upcoming Cursive single.

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Connexions going far

Mike Linksvayer, November 8th, 2006

ZDNet has a short and very sweet item on Rice University’s Connexions, a very early adopter of the CC Attribution license:

How far can this go? One of the big problems in college education is the cost of textbooks and courseware. It keeps smart kids from getting the degrees they need to succeed. Connexxions is putting the most-popular community college texts online free, with hardbound copies at $30 each.

Pretty far.

Read the whole post.

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Tango Desktop Project

Mike Linksvayer, November 8th, 2006

The Tango Desktop Project is creating beautiful icons intended for use in free software desktop applications, but usable by anyone (vector and bitmap formats) under the CC Attribution-ShareAlike license.


Old-school film graphic by Jakub Steiner, CC BY-SA.

Via Digg.

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Creative Commons launches the CC Swag Photo Contest on Flickr

Melissa Reeder, November 8th, 2006

Today, Creative Commons launched the first CC Swag Photo Contest on Flickr to promote our Annual Fundraising Campaign. The contest offers a chance for people to win prizes for creatively photographing their CC Swag (t-shirts, buttons, stickers, etc. — all available from the Support the Commons store) and showing their support for CC during this critical fundraising period. Two winners will have their photos used on Creative Commons’ informational postcards, which will be distributed internationally to promote CC and the winning photographers. Winners will receive 100 copies of the postcard with their photo. The winners will also be able to choose a Creative Commons board member to record a personalized outgoing voicemail announcement — that’s right, your friends can be greeted by Lawrence Lessig every time they call you! For more information, please visit the contest page and read the rules.

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Digital Tipping Point

Mike Linksvayer, November 8th, 2006

Newsforge has a story about Digital Tipping Point, a documentary on the free software and free culture movements now entering post-production. 59 clips have been posted so far to the DTP collection at the Internet Archive, all licensed under the CC Attribution-ShareAlike license:

Welcome to the The Digital Tipping Point (DTP) collection. The DTP crew describes their project as a Point-of-View (POV) documentary film about the rapidly growing global shift to open source software, and the effects that massive wave of technological change will have on literacy, art, and culture around the world.

The DTP crew says their project will be the first feature length documentary about free open source software to be built in an open source fashion out of video submitted to the Internet Archive.

The DTP crew has shot over 300 hours of footage of leading politicians, CEOs, and software developers from all over the world, and is now releasing this footage to the Internet Archive community under a Creative Commons Attribute-ShareAlike license.

The DTP crew invites you to take their video and rip, mix and burn it however you like, for whatever purpose you like. You can even use the footage for your own commercial film, as long as you release your final product under a Creative Commons Attribute-ShareAlike license.

Of course, The DTP crew asks you to consider joining their film effort, and contribute your edits, transcriptions, translations, animations, and music to the main DTP film effort, but please feel free to make your own video as well. The DTP crew hopes that their footage will spawn many films to be shown twice a year at open source software conferences such as OScon in Portland, Orgeon, and the FISL conference in Brazil.

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Call to all video artists who want to Support CC through Revverizing their videos

Melissa Reeder, November 8th, 2006

Last week we blogged the story of a CC supporter who decided to auction off on eBay the historic domain name 01b.com and to donate 90% of the generated revenue to CC.

This week, since we launched our Revverized videos, several CC supporters, such as CC Australia’s Elliott Bledsoe have proposed uploading their videos to CC’s Revver account so that their work could help generate funds for CC as well.

In response to our supporters’ request we will now upload any CC licensed video to our Revver site if the artist wants to donate the money generated to CC. We have uploaded CC Australia’s CC Mayer and Bettle Animation to Revver and encourage everyone to check it out. We also encourage the sharing, embedding, and blogging of this and all other CC videos as a way to support CC. If you are interested in sharing your video and also raising money for CC at the same time, please email your videos to Melissa Reeder.

We are constantly surprised by our community and the creative ways that our supporter’s conceive of raising us money. Thank you. Please let us know about other fantastic ideas by emailing melissa@creativecommons.org as well.

Watch the CC Australia Mayer and Bettle Animation and post it to your own blog!

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The Shakespeare Chronicles

Mike Linksvayer, November 8th, 2006

CC board member and Duke law professor Jamie Boyle is serializing his 19 years in progress novel, started “when I was Shakespeare’s lawyer in a televised mock trial in front of three Supreme Court Justices. He was accused of not being the real author of his own works.”

Each chapter of The Shakespeare Chronicles is being serialized under a CC Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives license, or you can buy a hardback, paperback, or PDF copy from Lulu.

As usual the great Boing Boing had the story first.

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Should CC release software licenses?

Lawrence Lessig, November 8th, 2006

It has been suggested that there would be some value in CC entering the field of software licensing. I am skeptical (there are plenty of software licenses) but the explosion of mixed code/content platforms (e.g., Flash) has led me to at least get feedback about the idea. So if you have thoughts about this, I’d be grateful if you could send them to software-licensing@creativecommons.org.

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REMINDER: CC Salon San Francisco this WED, NOV 8, 6-9 PM at Shinesf

Jon Phillips, November 7th, 2006

Don’t miss the next CC Salon
at shinesf from 6-9 PM on Wednesday, November 8
in San Francisco. This salon features famed
blogger and
SF Bay
Guardian
writer,
Annalee Newitz. Also,
Homebrew Mobile Club’s, Matthew Hamrick and
other HB Mobile Club members will be on hand to discuss his project’s
“Complete Open Phone,” a project to produce open source cellphones with CC licensed plans and content accessible on them. Finally, Wendell Davis is going to present the new
on-line music editor and mash-up community,
Splice. And, just added to the dynamic
line-up is Steve from
Alive in Baghdad, an amazing videoblog
of interviews and stories by Iraqis directly from the streets of Iraq, bypassing
corporate media. Throughout the salon the
Kleptones are going to spice up the
evening with music and interludes.

So come on out on Wednesday, bring a big stack of business cards,
some cash for drinks, and lets talk about the Commons. This is the last salon of
the year, as our regular 2nd-Wednesday December salon is combined with a special
birthday party for Creative Commons on FRIDAY, DECEMBER 15. Stay tuned for more info.

You may track this CC Salon on upcoming.org. See you this Wednesday!

UPDATE: Come to the special Creative Commons Publishers’ Association meeting at 5 PM. From the even’t wiki page, it is characterized as a “A collection of representatives from organizations that publish content under a Creative Commons license.”

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Polling Place Photo Project

Mike Linksvayer, November 7th, 2006

It is election day in the United States jurisdiction. The Polling Place Photo Project aims to use mass citizen journalism to document democracy:

The Polling Place Photo Project is a nationwide experiment in citizen journalism that seeks to empower citizens to capture, post and share photographs of democracy in action. By documenting their local voting experience on November 7, voters can contribute to an archive of photographs that captures the richness and complexity of voting in America.

With citizens’ images and the information that accompanies them, the Project becomes a research tool on how voting happens in America and how it can be designed to be easier, less confusing and more enjoyable. The project intends to collect photographs of every polling place in America, so you are encouraged to participate no matter where you vote, how large or small your polling place is, what kind of ballot you use, or what your party affiliation.

All photos are contributed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives license.



Voters in Peteluma, California photo by Suzuki Cady licensed under CC BY-ND.

Participate!

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