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2008 November

Robin Chase of ZipCar and GoLoco on “Cooperative Capitalism”

Eric Steuer, November 17th, 2008

Robin Chase, co-founder and former CEO of car sharing service Zipcar, and current CEO of online carpooling service GoLoco recently wrote a great post entitled “Time for Cooperative Capitalism” on her blog, Network Musings. In it, Chase describes the need for developing systems that enable the easy and efficient sharing of resources – both online and in the physical world – with a focus on collaborative financing, infrastructure, and consumption. She also offers a simple formula for people, companies, and institutions looking to engage in this approach.

1. Identify excess capacity.
2. Build a platform for others to share/engage with this excess capacity.
3. Appreciate unanticipated benefits

Check out Chase’s TED Talk from 2007 (the video is under a Creative Commons BY-NC-ND license) that explores some of these same ideas, specifically in ways that apply to transportation.

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Thingiverse Launches with Stellar Commons Implementation

Fred Benenson, November 17th, 2008

PASCSR by nickfarr under CC BY-SABre Pettis, the uber-DIY hacker of NYC’s Resistor space and self-replicator guru Zach Hoeken are launching Thingiverse today.

Thingiverse is an “object sharing” site that enables anyone to upload the schematics, designs, and images for their projects. Users can then download and reuse the work in their projects using their own laser cutters, 3D printers, and analog tools. Think of it as a Flickr for the Maker set.

Besides implementing our licenses, Bre and Zach have also gone the distance and allowed users to license works under the GNU GPL, LGPL, and BSD licenses, as well as allowing them to release works into the public domain. Thingiverse uses our license wrappers for each of these licenses thereby enabling automatic indexing by machines like search engines.

Pushing the envelope even further, Thingiverse also fully implements our RDFa specification (just take a look at the source of any page with a CC license to see RDFa in action) for expressing licensing and authorship information on the semantic web. This means that aside from telling machines that a work is licensed under CC, Thingiverse also tells machines the title of a work, its author, and other interesting semantic information.

If you’re looking for a fantastic example of how to implement the commons on a platform designed for sharing creativity, look no further than Thingiverse.

(The Polyalphabetic Substitution Cipher Slide Rule by nickfarr under CC BY-SA)

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Cory Doctorow @ Locus Magazine: Why I Copyfight

Eric Steuer, November 17th, 2008

Author, blogger, and permissive copyright activist Cory Doctorow writes a regular column for Locus, a monthly magazine that covers science fiction and fantasy publishing. His current column, “Why I Copyfight,” is filled with thoughtful analysis of why writers are increasingly using open approaches to distributing their work. A year ago, Doctorow wrote a great piece about Creative Commons for Locus; both columns are highly recommended.

I was recently talking to a friend, D.K. Thompson, who has been posting pieces of a YA novel entitled Unbelievable Origin of Superspiff and the Toothpick Kid, for the past several months. We’d never talked directly about Creative Commons before, so I was particularly interested to hear that he was publishing the entire story via poscast under a CC BY-NC-ND license. He, like other authors I have met, told me that he’s using CC because it helps define clear usage permissions and extends the work’s reach. Superspiff is a lot of fun – you can download episodes from it on D.K.’s site.

Literary publishing is a quickly-changing field, with new distribution models emerging regularly. We’re always eager to hear about authors who are using our tools to achieve their desired ends. If you or someone you know is offering their novel, short stories, poetry, or other literature under Creative Commons licenses (or if you’re a reader who has enjoyed someone else’s work that has been made available under CC terms), we’d be grateful if you would point us to it in the comments section of this post.

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Spain’s Version 3.0 goes live

Michelle Thorne, November 17th, 2008

Creative Commons Spain and Catalonia has successfully completed its versioning of the ported Creative Commons licensing suite to Version 3.0. The six standard Creative Commons licenses are now legally and linguistically adapted to Spanish law and available in Castilian, Catalan, and Basque, with a Galician translation coming soon and now Galician.

CC Spain and Catalonia is lead by Ignasi Labastida i Juan and in affiliation with the renown Universitat de Barcelona, The Spanish community continues to rank among the most frequent and permissive license users, and the country hosts numerous CC-powered projects and proponents, including the collaborative Freesound database, netAudio.es and its associated netlabels, several departments of the Catalan government, and institutions like Universitat de Girona with dedicated open resources for research and learning.

“Version 3.0 of the licenses is more robust and clarifies some aspects related to moral rights and rights collective management,” explains Ignasi Labastida i Juan. “We now have many users, but there is still a lot of work to do to explain the meaning of using a CC license in specific fields.”

Creative Commons International, a project of Creative Commons, continues to work with legal experts and professionals around the world to ensure the licenses’ global interoperability and their jurisdictional legal certainty.

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The Outcomes Star System

Cameron Parkins, November 14th, 2008

The Outcomes Star System is a “tool for measuring the outcomes of work with homeless people,” specifically designed for use by homeless charities. The Outcomes Star System focuses on “an approach to measuring change” on 10 different criteria, the theory being that by following The Outcomes Star System, outreach to the homeless can be approached with pragmatism and a level of success.

Homeless Outcomes, the group behind the Star System, has published their entire website under a CC BY-NC-SA license, including the Star System. By allowing these files to be easily shared and reused legally, Homeless Outcomes is empowering other groups by offering them a free and open system to help enact social change. You can see the Outcomes Star re-posted below:

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Games for the Brain

Cameron Parkins, November 14th, 2008

Games for the Brain is a fun site that features a number of memory, quiz, and brain games all released under a CC BY-NC-SA license. A number of the games are embeddable, making them easily available for sharing while others reuse previously CC-licensed material. Whether it is an online destination to pass time, procrastinate, or hone your mental skills, Games for the Brain is a nice and simple addition to the growing landscape of CC-licensed content.

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We met wikiHow’s challenge in 4 days!

Melissa Reeder, November 14th, 2008

I’m thrilled to announce that we have far exceeded wikiHow’s matching challenge goal of raising $3000 in two weeks. We raised $3000 in 4 days! Thanks to wikiHow for their ongoing support (they’ve been CC supporters for 4 years running) and to our community members for helping us meet wikiHow’s challenge!

The campaign will end at midnight (PST) on December 31st, and it’s extremely important that we reach our goal by then. Please help us reach our $500,000 goal. If you work for a company that shares the same ideals – let them know they can run their own matching challenge. If interested please contact me at development@creativecommons.org.

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5 New Companies Support CC!

Melissa Reeder, November 13th, 2008

Transparency is of the utmost importance to us here at CC, especially when it comes to who is funding us. People ask me all the time how CC is funded, to which I answer: CC relies entirely on the community in order to stay afloat. The community being the individuals, corporations, foundations, organizations, and institutions that believe the work CC does is important and necessary.

Today, I’m excited to announce five new corporate supporters: Nevo Technologies, Ebay, DotAsia, Safe Creative, and wikiHow. Each of these companies values the innovation that is made possible through openness and all five recognize that supporting CC is their way of helping sustain the architecture of that openness.

Please consider joining these companies and the hundreds of other individuals who have invested in the future of CC and participatory culture. If you work for a company that uses CC or supports the same ideals, please encourage them to invest in CC.

We have a little over a month and a half left and still have a long way to go to reach our goal of $500,000. We need your help – donate today!

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ccLearn Welcomes New Counsel

Jane Park, November 13th, 2008

ccLearn welcomes its very first legal counsel, Lila Bailey, who will join our current team of two in February of next year. We have been seeking a counsel for months, and though the process has been long, it has been thorough and patient. We feel confident that we have found an excellent match in Lila, who fulfills the necessary qualifications and also brings a vitality and passion to her forthcoming role as an advocate and counsel for open education.

Lila will join our San Francisco office from Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, where she practices Internet-related litigation and counseling, with a particular focus on novel copyright and privacy issues. Lila has also worked with the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) where she was an Intellectual Property Fellow in 2007. She earned her Juris Doctor at the University of California, Berkeley School of Law (Boalt Hall) after graduating from Brown University with a BA in Philosophy.

With the busyness of the holidays ahead, we are delighted to head into the new year with Lila committed to our team.

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Onemedia Unconference

Greg Grossmeier, November 13th, 2008

If you can’t attend the Standford Open Source (Un)Conference this Friday because you are in London, you are in luck! There is another unconference option right in your city!

The Onemedia Unconference, which is being held in London today and tomorrow, is hoping to provide a venue for all who are interested in how new or multiple media technologies will transform the business landscape. The attendees of the conference will represent a variety of industries including TV, Film, Games, Animation, Mobile, Software, and Music industries.

Especially useful will be what is produced by the conference: a report that collects all of the unconference’s output from the wide breadth of topics that will be covered. The report will be provided under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives license so attendees are free to share this report with others to allow for more enhanced discussion to happen.

If you are interested in how businesses are reacting to and creating new changes in the content arena you should check out the conference if able or at least the report when it is released.

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