GOOD + “The First 100 Days” charticle

Eric Steuer, November 12th, 2008

Over the past year, GOOD has grown from having a primary focus on magazine publishing to being a media mini-empire, with its hand in videos, blogging, event production, and a variety of other activities, both online and off. The company’s cornerstone project, GOOD magazine, is still going strong – and is published under a Creative Commons license (BY-NC-ND).

One of my favorite elements of the magazine is its design, which is managed by creative director Casey Caplowe, who spoke recently at CC Salon LA about the advantages of using an open approach to creating and distributing content. The greatness of the magazine’s design is typified by a recurring feature called the GOOD Sheet, which presents large volumes of information in useful and beautiful graphical formats. The most recent GOOD Sheet is a collaboration with designer Atley Kasky called “The First 100 Days” and offers a sampling of decisions made by various US presidents in their first months in office.

"The First 100 Days" - (c) GOOD Worldwide, 2008, made available under a CC BY-NC-ND license. Click above for a not-tiny version of this cool chart.

Update (12/03/08): The GOOD Sheet came out of a relationship between GOOD and Starbucks, in which the latter agreed to distribute free weekly newsprint copies of the GOOD Sheet in its stores for eleven weeks. This means that for the eleven weeks prior to the US presidential election, Creative Commons-licensed media was being given away for free to hundreds of thousands of people in Starbucks stores. Pretty cool. This New York Times article describes the deal.

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Science Commons’ John Wilbanks profiled at Seedmagazine.com

Eric Steuer, November 12th, 2008

Seedmagazine.com, the online companion of Seed magazine, is a great resource for science news and insight. Today, the site profiles John Wilbanks – Creative Commons’ VP of Science and head of Science Commons – as part of its “Revolutionary Minds” series. In the video and accompanying article, John talks about the benefits that sharing and an open web culture can bring to the world of scientific innovation.

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The Fader: The State of the Remix

Eric Steuer, November 11th, 2008

Music and culture magazine The Fader launched a new online column today called “A Rational Conversation Between Two Adults,” in which editor Eric Ducker IM-terviews a staffmember or guest about a subject of interest to the magazine’s readers. The debut entry is a chat with DJ, producer, and label head Nick Catchdubs about “The State of the Remix.” Although Creative Commons doesn’t come up specifically, the discussion highlights several ideas that are revelant to musicians and remixers working to advance CC’s concepts and tools.

It’s always been a symbiotic relationship, and I think the degree of who benefits more depends on the individual track. What’s interesting now is that there’s a definite “remix economy,” both on the official side with a constant stream of commissioned remixes from labels looking to get in on sounds/scenes that are bubbling and managers hustling to get work for their producers, as well as the unofficial tracks from producers looking to make a name for themselves by bombarding the internet. What I always think about in regards to remixes is, “Does this need to exist?” To me the best remixes become new songs that are greater than the sum of its individual parts.

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Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education

Jane Park, November 11th, 2008

Today, the Center for Social Media at AU released a Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy in Education—a guide for educators and students to the use of copyrighted materials in the classroom. This guide is aimed at clearing up many of the urban myths surrounding copyright, as many educators mistakenly believe that the use of copyrighted photographs in the classroom is illegal, when in fact, fair use allows such uses without teachers even having to obtain permissions.

From last week’s press release

“A variety of content and media is now available online, but fear and misinformation have kept teachers and students from using this valuable material, including portions of films, TV coverage, photos, songs, articles, and audio, in the classroom.

Now, thanks to a coordinated effort by the media literacy community, supported by experts at American University and Temple University, teachers and students have a step-by-step guide that simplifies the legalities of using copyrighted materials in an academic setting…

The Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education outlines five principles, each with limitations:

Educators can, under some circumstances:

      1. Make copies of newspaper articles, TV shows, and other copyrighted works, and use them and keep them for educational use.

      2. Create curriculum materials and scholarship with copyrighted materials embedded.

      3. Share, sell and distribute curriculum materials with copyrighted materials embedded.

Learners can, under some circumstances:

      4. Use copyrighted works in creating new material

      5. Distribute their works digitally if they meet the transformativeness standard.”

A great video accompanies the guide, if you want a quick and entertaining primer on the issues the code addresses.

This project was funded by one of our own long-term supporters, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

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CC Salon LA TONIGHT: Dublab and Lucas Gonze

Cameron Parkins, November 11th, 2008

A reminder that TONIGHT CC Salon LA returns with a fantastic combination of presenters – joining us will be web radio collective Dublab and Lucas Gonze, net-label theorist and XSPF developer.

Both presentations will discuss how CC, and ‘openness’ in general, is affecting web radio and net labels, both from an economic and artistic vantage, with a Q&A to follow each. Additionally, Dublab will ask salon attendees to create noise – both as a group and as individuals – which will be recorded and turned into audio loops that will be used for the Into Infinity project, a new art exhibition produced in collaboration with Creative Commons.

The Salon will be taking place at the always wonderful FOUND Gallery (Google map) between 7:30PM – 9:30PM. Follow the event on Upcoming, mark attending on Facebook, and make sure to come down and hear from two exemplary members of the CC community on their experiences with open licensing. As always, there will be free (as in beer) drinks for the entire night.

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CC Talks With: Lucky Dragons

Cameron Parkins, November 10th, 2008

Lucky Dragons, an experimental music/art group based in Los Angeles, is the moniker given to “any recorded or performed or installed or packaged or shared pieces made by Luke Fischbeck, Sarah Rara, and any sometimes collaborator.” Blending an organic approach to electronic music with a background in the arts, everything Lucky Dragons produces is released under a CC BY-NC-SA license, allowing others to share what they have made as well as rework it (much of their music is available for free download on their website). We recently caught up with the duo to learn more about their music and motivation to use CC. We also touched upon their experience participating in the Into Infinity project, their associated projects Sumi Ink Club/Glaciers of Nice, and what their plans are for the future.

Can you give our readers a bit of background on yourselves? How did you get involved with music and art? What is Lucky Dragon’s background as an artistic outfit?

Fischbeck: lucky dragons started as a “band” in the loosest form possible around eight years ago, as a way to structure our activities as a group in an easily understandable and distributable way, making recordings or books or videos or performances and putting them out into the world. for the most part, we have definitely used the existing structure of independently produced music to do this, but as this structure has been changing so much in our lifetime, we have been keen to look for new and positive paths and models, trying to contribute to a new definition of “band” that includes contexts such as public art, the gallery system, museum programming, blogs, and small-press publishing.

Rara: My entry into making music was initially through making videos and composing sound to go with a moving image until I became more and more engrossed in the production of sounds and the potential of music to bring people together in a very concrete way, forming transient communities and generating equal power-sharing situations. It’s interesting now to alternate between music and art contexts, to slip in and out of each world and to borrow from each various modes and identities. I enjoy slipping into a “band” identity that confuses authorship and opens up the project to various collaborators, even going so far as to dissolve the separation between myself and the audience during the performance. I’ve always thought of the role of the artist as more diffused and inclusive, it can include sitting on a stage and playing a modified kalimba for half an hour or it can include an everyday situation like having a conversation with a stranger. But somehow the means of distributing art in the world are not as inclusive and wide-ranging as music distribution. Music has a tradition of self-publishing and cheap distribution that I find very inspiring; it’s easy to produce something that is accessible to everyone and easily shared when operating within the form of a musical group.

Read More…

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Aviary’s Remix Community

Fred Benenson, November 10th, 2008

UnzippedKitty.egg by meowza on Aviary

Aviary‘s mission is to “make the world’s creation accessible.” So it makes sense that they’ve baked Creative Commons licensing into their platform of live image editing applications. The site has launched with three distinct tools (with more to come) that help artists create and share fantastic images with the eventual intention of creating a new kind of market place to encourage commercial licensing of their CC licensed work through our new CC+ protocol. Aviary supports both our Attribution and Attribution-NonCommercial license.

One other feature that is unprecedented about Aviary is the ability to load other creator’s work directly into a new work, thus allowing for radically efficient in-platform remixing of content. Just think of what could happen if YouTube offered in-browser remix functionality for other people’s videos.

Sign up for an account today and start tinkering, or browse some of the amazing works already populating the community.

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CC in the Hong Kong Standard

Cameron Parkins, November 10th, 2008

There is a great write-up on CC in a recent edition of the Hong Kong Standard – the article coincided with the launch of CC Hong Kong, our fiftieth jurisdiction to enact license porting. Focusing on the wonderful anecdote of former Featured Commoner Colin Mutchler, how CC licenses work, and how CC is increasing collaborative efforts for Hong Kong residents, the article is a simple and clear introduction to CC for a new geographical locale.

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Tout de Suite Series: Author’s Rights

Cameron Parkins, November 10th, 2008

Digital Scholarship, a website run and maintained by information management expert Charles W. Bailey, Jr., recently published a fantastic article regarding author’s rights for their Tout de Suite series. The article aims to “give journal article authors a quick introduction to key aspects of authorʹs rights” and is released under a CC BY-NC license. The document includes a wide range of information regarding CC, including information about how to license works, guidelines for proper attribution, and suggestions as to which license is best suited for academic journals (Bailey argues BY and BY-NC).

Bailey has published various other CC-related articles on Digital Scholarship, all released under a CC BY-NC license. For those looking to expand their knowledge of information studies, the site is an great reference.

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Kelly Link on Creative Commons

Cameron Parkins, November 10th, 2008

Author Kelly Link, renowned for her work in a variety of literary genres, is specifically noteworthy to the CC community for her decision in 2005 to release Stranger Things Happen, her first major collection of short stories, under a CC BY-NC-SA license. In a recent interview with The Nation, Link addressed this decision:

As a reader, I really prefer a book, an object. But I also really like the idea of being able to give stuff away for free. Up to a certain extent, the more you make something available, the more people pass it around. There are many, many, many more downloads of the collection, but sales for the physical book have never gone down. During the first year it was available online, the sales went up. It works the same way a library does.

One of the things about the Creative Commons is that it also meant that the stories, in terms of ideas or narrative, are up there and available to people who want to make other things out of them. A couple of the stories have been made into plays. Somebody took one of the stories and made an experimental music piece from it. I think she turned the prose of the story into a kind of Morse code and then set that into a score for cello. A lot of people have done podcasts of the stories. When I write, I’m constantly drawing from fairy tales or books that I love. This was a way to make the stories available to a larger community and enter into a larger conversation.

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