Poland

Report from the Creative Commons board meeting in Warsaw

Cathy Casserly, October 27th, 2011

CC’s Board of Directors met during the first day of the Global Summit on September 16, 2011 at the Primate’s Palace in Warsaw, Poland. Prof. Brian Fitzgerald was appointed as a Director of the corporation and to its Audit Committee. The Board also expressed its grateful appreciation to Alek Tarkowski and the CC Poland team for their excellent preparation of the Global Summit and to departing Vice President John Wilbanks for his outstanding accomplishments at Science Commons. Prof. Carroll reported on the success of the recent Global Congress on Intellectual Property and the Public Interest noting that CC affiliates formed a significant portion of leading thinkers and activists in this field and pointed to the resulting Washington Declaration on Intellectual Property and the Public Interest. The Audit Committee’s conflict of interest reviews were also ratified. The remainder of the meeting was dedicated to discussion of improvements to the board structure, fundraising, and strategic objectives.

This was the first time in six years that a CC Board meeting has been held in conjunction with an affiliate Summit event. It was a unique and immensely helpful opportunity for the Directors to make personal contacts with CC supporters and to share directly in the rich expertise and insightful perspective of the affiliate community.

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Highlights from the Creative Commons Global Summit

Jane Park, September 29th, 2011

With the worldwide CC community now home, or well on their way, we can officially declare the Creative Commons Global Summit 2011 a huge success.

For three days Warsaw, Poland, became the center of the CC world, with almost 300 people – including over 160 CC affiliates, board, and staff – examining all aspects of the movement, the licenses and community. From CC’s ongoing strategy to the latest implementations worldwide to the role of openness in the Arab Spring, the conversations, presentations and debates were diverse and exciting.

Overall, the Summit flew by without a hitch—thanks in great part to the CC Poland team who were our generous hosts, and to the myriad other affiliates and staff who contributed to organizing and running sessions on public sector information (PSI), data, creative CC projects, open education, and more. For more detail, check out the full program (pdf) and the wiki for the unconference track that ran in parallel.

Action items from this outpouring of ideas are still being developed – particularly next steps around the next version, 4.0, of the CC license suite. We’ll be blogging in greater detail on some of these soon (look for a separate 4.0 announcement in the first part of October), but for now we’d like to recap a few other highlights from the summit!

Media

Several affiliates have already covered the summit on their personal blogs; we highly recommend reading Andrés Guadamuz’s (Project Lead of CC UK Scotland) take on the Version 4.0 discussion and Brian Wesolowski’s (CC Qatar) summary post, which includes his showcase of the ways the Qatar Museum Authority is exploring the use of CC licenses to share its collections and resources.


Kristina by DTKindler Photo / CC BY

Such showcases and talks from the CC affiliates and broader community were without question the highlight of the Summit. Many of  these are now available on the CC community group on SlideShare.

Video from the livestream in the main hall is also being uploaded, with the raw footage of several sessions available at CC Poland’s Blip.tv account. An excellent set of high quality crowd-sourced photos are also available at the CC Global Summit Flickr pool. For all media from the Summit, see the Event coverage at the Global Summit wiki.

Some other highlights from community, PSI, education, and culture streams of the Summit:

Community Global Perspectives

This year’s Summit had a particular focus on community and aimed to highlight and facilitate the work of CC affiliates around the world. Central to this aim was the Global Perspectives panel, which featured prominent community members from Asia and the Pacific, Latin America, the Arab World and Africa, all of whom provided their views on the unique challenges, opportunities and goals for CC in their regions.

Chunyen Wang from CC China Mainland, representing Asia and the Pacific, focused on how CC’s message aligned with traditional Chinese notions of sharing. Naeema Zarif from CC Lebanon, representing the Arab World, focused on CC’s role as a cultural and community flash point. Claudio Ruiz from CC Chile, representing Latin America, focused on the role of the CC community as advocates for copyright balance. And finally, Dorothy K. Gordon from The Ghana-India Kofi Annan Centre of Excellence in ICT, representing Africa, focused on CC as a way of bringing people together across geographic boundaries. (Video)

Public Sector Information (PSI)

Several sessions focused on the role of CC licenses and tools for PSI. In our PSI “around the world session,” (video) we discussed how CC licenses and tools are adopted in some fashion within governments in over 30 affiliate jurisdictions, hearing updates from affiliates in Poland to Chile to Korea to Australia, and many others. There were other sessions, including one on examining the role of CC within the broader open government and PSI community. We discussed several key points, including:

  • In general, governments and public sector bodies want to share what they create with the world, and the civil society communities and projects that support open government continues to explode. CC wants and needs to be a central participant, to make it easy for governments to make informed choices with regard to licensing and sharing, and realize the full potential of PSI; even in affiliate jurisdictions where there is little CC or open licensing uptake at the government/PSI level, the affiliates indicated that this will become an increasingly important area.
  • Governments and other public sector bodies would be more willing to adopt CC if specific considerations were addressed. An obvious example of this is addressing sui generis database rights in version 4.0 of the license.
  • CC could build a case studies repository of open government successes to assist governments to make informed choices with regards to the legal aspects of PSI, in addition to other educational materials. Perhaps it’s worthwhile to build upon existing frameworks and roadmaps in jurisdictions already moving ahead within the open government and open data space. Other questions that came up: should CC work with related community members on legal considerations for a set of open government data principles? What are other activities and projects that CC can and should be participating in?

Education


DTKindler Photo / CC BY

We ran several sessions on open education, all of which helped to focus our education strategy and next steps for specific projects.

In the “School of IP, Copyright & CC,” panelists discussed their work on and the potential for shared curricular materials (video, lesson plans, sample projects, talking points) around Copyright, IP & Creative Commons designed to encourage students and teachers to practice the 4 R’s (reuse, revise, remix, redistribute) as part of their learning and teaching. It was evident that there is widespread need for such materials. Outcomes from this panel fed into the CC Education Strategy Workshop where groups met and prioritized the following CC Education projects:

    1. School of Open with P2PU
    2. Open Policy / Legislation exchange
    3. Improving OER search and discovery. The Learning Resource Metadata Initiative (LRMI).
    4. Ability to track use and reuse of CC-licensed works.

The “School of Open,” which would aim to collaboratively develop and run curriculum and courses on copyright and CC license training for educators, librarians, and others, was the most popular, gaining lots of buy-in from affiliates and external partners. “Open Policy / Legislation exchange” was seen as being able to be incorporated in the “School of Open,” with some policy-strategic conversations remaining offline and private to the CC community. The LRMI is already funded and running, and the session gained lots of preliminary support for adopting, tagging, and educating around the metadata schema when it is published. #4 — the “Ability to track use and reuse of CC-licensed works” — was the most technically and legally focused project discussed. In general, the education field wants and needs this, and CC will continue to push to keep it on the agenda for education and other domains. The education domain in particular can help describe some use cases and needed features.

Culture

In addition to the cultural evening events, the culture sessions resulted in some excellent showcases around CC license use in the Galleries, Libraries, Archives, and Museums sector (GLAM) and CC use in other creative projects from around the world.

In the GLAM session, Chiaki (CC Asia Regional Project Manager) presented a wonderful showcase from Japan where, as Brian notes, “visitors were encouraged to take photos of art in the museum and share the photos under [CC licenses].” Paul Keller (CC Netherlands) and Brian Wesolowski (CC Qatar) also talked about GLAM projects in their regions, which included a Wiki Loves Art project that took place in the Netherlands and as previously mentioned, ways the Qatar Museum Authority, including the Museum of Islamic Art, Mathaf and the Qatar National Museum, are exploring the use of CC licenses to share their collections and resources.

In the CC Project Showcase session, organized by Renata Avila (CC Guatemala), a diverse array of projects were presented in quick ten-minute slideshows, including Herkko Hietanen’s (CC Finland) PowerPoint plugin for finding and attributing CC-licensed images (screencast), Dadae Choi’s presentation of CC Korea’s own search engine for CC-licensed works, plus Jennifer Kang’s overview of open culture in Korea, Claudio Ruiz’s (CC Chile) talk on Derechos Digitales’ work to open academic journals in Latin America, Bilal Randeree’s talk on CC use in Al Jazeera, and more project showcases by CC Mainland China and CC Guatemala.

Where are we?

Since CC was founded in 2001, our network of affiliates has come a long way. CC VP Mike Linksvayer gave an excellent overview of what’s happened in CC and the open community over the last three years. CC CEO Cathy Casserly, CC Chair Joi Ito, and Affiliate Network Coordinator Jessica Coates led a discussion on the CC Vision, how it has changed, and how it might be refined going forward.

Today, with our new regional managers on board, in addition to our existing managers, Chiaki (Asia), Donatella (Middle East), and Aurelia (Africa), we are excited to renew progress and make even greater strides. We’ve already noted improvements we can make in communications, and will work closely with the affiliates to form taskforce groups on this and other matters.

The Summit has been a key step in each of these goals, and will be a catalyst to CC’s ongoing growth as we move into our second decade.

Stay tuned for more on Version 4.0, regional community updates, CC in science, and a report on the Board meeting at the summit.

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ccMixter remix collaboration for the Global Summit CC Salon

Jane Park, September 7th, 2011

Two of the main Polish acts for the Global Summit CC Salon (a musical concert) are encouraging remixes of their tracks under CC BY-NC-SA. A couple sample tracks have been uploaded to ccMixter.org, under users “masala” and “axmusique.”

Masala is a music fusion collective whose genre can only be determined as ethno-electro-ragga-punk-hip-hop, which is famous for combining Asian music with electronics. Masala wants you to remix Rewolucja w nas at ccMixter.

AXMusique is an unusual producer duo who earned the affection of fans and publishers with powerful concerts mixing electronic and rock-and-roll music. AXMusique wants you to remix Hardline at ccMixter.

Both musical groups will choose their favorite remixes, which will be played at the CC Salon with names of the remixers projected by VJs. For more info on the CC Salon and other cultural events at the Global Summit, see the Global Summit Cultural Events program.

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Poland’s Version 3.0 Licenses Now Online

Michelle Thorne, July 23rd, 2009

Flag_of_PolandInternationalization is an essential aspect and major strength of Creative Commons. Our global efforts focus not only on establishing new jurisdiction projects, but also on working closely with long-standing national projects to upgrade localized licenses and to strengthen the commons worldwide. CC Poland, one of the earliest jurisdictions to found a national Creative Commons project, releases today its set of Poland-specific CC licenses at Version 3.0, Creative Commons’ most current license version.

The upgrade is significant for several reasons, one being that Version 3.0 encompasses our long-held vision of establishing a compatibility structure to allow interoperability between different flexible content copyright licenses. This structure has opened doors for important adopters, such as the Wikipedia community and Wikimedia Foundation, who recently approved the adoption the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 (CC BY-SA) license as the main content license for Wikipedia and other Wikimedia sites.

The Polish upgrade to Version 3.0 was led by Alek Tarkowski, Justyna Hofmokl, and Krzysztof Siewicz and hosted at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling at Warsaw University (ICM UW) and the Grynhoff, Woźny and Maliński Law Firm. Through these efforts and more, CC Poland continues to build the local Creative Commons community and promote free culture.

An enormous thank you to CC Poland, to Alek, Justyna, and Krzysztof, for their invaluable efforts to support Polish creators and to improve Creative Commons’ ever-growing international pool of free legal tools.

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Open Education and Open Science in Poland

Jane Park, May 14th, 2009

Two very important conferences were held in Warsaw earlier this month (and late last month): “Open Educational Resources in Poland” (23 April) and “Open Science in Poland” (5 May). Alek Tarkowski, Public Lead of Creative Commons Poland, elaborates on the open education workshops held at each conference, one of which was led by ccLearn’s Ahrash Bissell:

“Two practical workshops on open education were organized by the Coalition for Open Education (KOED) in coincidence with two conferences taking place in Warsaw in April and May 2009: the conference on open education on 23rd of April 2009 and the conference on open science on 6th of May 2009. The first workshop, conducted by Susan d’Antoni from UNESCO and Richard Baraniuk from the Connexions project at Rice University, provided an overview of practical issues tied to open education, such as community building, IT tools and development strategies. The second workshop, led by Ahrash Bissell from ccLearn, focused on open licensing issues.

The two workshops were attended by a dozen representatives of NGOs active in the field of education and culture, as well as representatives from the Ministry of Education. Most important, they provided an opportunity for people working with open educational projects or considering starting such a project to meet and network.

As a result of the project, the Coalition for Open Education hopes to increase its number of member institutions, as well as enable the growth of open educational projects in Poland.”

For information on the conferences themselves, check out Alek’s detailed reports for both.

Read More…

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Files seeded for Valkaama, “open source movie”

Michelle Thorne, January 16th, 2009

valkaama_small

The source files have been seeded for Valkaama, a fresh collaborative “open source movie”, filmed in Krakow, Poland.  Director Tim Baumann intends to complete the post-production of the full feature movie publicly, with the help of volunteers both amateur and professional:

Here all available media sources are published in order to give you the chance to build upon them. If you want to participate in this project, by helping finishing the movie, creating remixes, making a new trailer or if you want to publish anything else here which is related to Valkaama, please get in touch with us.

Valkaama (trailer) is a drama set in Sweden and Finland and produced by drama school students and amateurs in and around Krakow. It tells the story of two disparate young men, each seeking his fortune, thrown together by fate to travel to “Valkaama”. As their paths cross, they do not realize how much of their journey has already been determined by their pasts.

Open Source and Open Content movies are still a rarity. Valkaama is one of the first movies not only to be distributed freely, but also to guarantee free access to all source data used and created during the production process. The project uses CC BY-SA 3.0 licenses to guarantee very flexible use and reuse of the produced material. Almost every text, picture and video, as well as all downloadable media, is tagged with a respective license. In some cases the licenses are included in the media files themselves.

Happy remixing!

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Public Domain Works Celebrated in Poland

Michelle Thorne, January 9th, 2009

It’s after Three Kings Day, and after battling inboxes, CCi is back online and blogging. From our colleagues in CC Poland, some more exciting Public Domain Day news to ring in the New Year:

Poland’s Coalition for Open Education (KOED – Koalicja Otwartej Edukacji) has celebrated the Public Domain Day 2009 with a range of web-based actions and a press conference.

The Polish National Library, with the support of its director, dr. Tomasz Makowski, hosted talks about the public domain and related Polish projects at a press conference on Dec. 30. Bożena Michalska from the Nicolaus Copernicus University Library presented a list of over 500 authors whose works entered the public domain in Poland on 1st January 2009, based on the National Union Catalog NUKAT. Afterwards, Marek Siudym, a renowned Polish actor, recited a poem by Brunon Jasieński – a Polish futurist, who died in 1938 and who’s work is now in the public domain.

As a result of the well-attended conference, news of the Public Domain Day 2009 was published in a range of major media, including Gazeta Wyborcza and Rzeczpospolita dailies, Polish Public Radio, and the online portal Onet.

To coincide with the Public Domain Day 2009, Polish libraries have made available over a dozen works in their digital collections that are, as of January 1st 2009, in the public domain in Poland. A list of Polish works now in the public domain is maintained on the Coalition’s webpage.

The newly forged partnership, KOED, is striving to build and promote open educational resources in Poland. Bringing together common supporters of the Capetown Declaration principles, the Coalition is formed by one of CC Poland’s affiliate institutions, the Interdisciplinary Center for Modelling at University of Warsaw, and colleagues Wikimedia Polska Association, Foundation Modern Poland, and the Polish Librarians Association.

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