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Author: Jocelyn Miyara

Open Culture Live Recap & Recording: Respectful Terminologies & Changing the Subject

Open Culture
A detail from the painting showing a scene of Indian princesses gathered around a fountain with multi-colored dresses, overlaid with the CC Open Culture logo and Open Culture Live wordmark, and text saying “Changing the Subject & Respectful Technologies 29 November 2023 | 4:00 PM UTC” and including an attribution for the image: “Princesses Gather at a Fountain, ca. 1770 Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art.” Princesses Gather at Fountain”, ca. 1770, shown slightly cropped. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Public Domain.

On 22 November, we organized a webinar with a group of experts to discuss their unique approaches to reparative metadata practices: considering the ways that harmful histories and terminologies have made their way into collections labeling and categorization practices and finding ways to identify those terms, contextualize them, and/or replace them altogether. Jill Baron, a…

Highlights from GLAM Wiki by the CC Open Culture Team

Open Culture
From left to right, the team stands together with GLAM Wiki Lanyards. Jocelyn has short brown curly hair and wears a black and white dress with a black shirt. Brigitte has light brown hair and wears jeans and a pink jacket. Connor wears a white button up shirt and jeans, glasses. Jennryn has long blonde hair and colorful hoop earrings with a CC t-shirt. The team is featured in front of an ornate door and checkered black and white tiled floor. Picture of the Creative Commons team at GLAM Wiki, Montevideo, Uruguay, 17 November, 2023. From left to right: Jocelyn Miyara, Brigitte Vézina, Connor Benedict, and Jennryn Wetzler. © Creative Commons, licensed CC-BY.

From 16 to 18 November, members of the Creative Commons (CC) Open Culture and Learning and Training teams attended GLAM Wiki in Montevideo Uruguay. In this blog post we look back at the event’s highlights from CC’s perspective.

Open Culture Live Webinar: Changing the Subject & Respectful Terminologies

Open Culture
A detail from the painting showing a scene of Indian princesses gathered around a fountain with multi-colored dresses, overlaid with the CC Open Culture logo and Open Culture Live wordmark, and text saying “Changing the Subject & Respectful Technologies 29 November 2023 | 4:00 PM UTC” and including an attribution for the image: “Princesses Gather at a Fountain, ca. 1770 Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art.” Princesses Gather at Fountain”, ca. 1770, shown slightly cropped. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Public Domain.

For centuries, cultural heritage institutions have been undertaking the work to document and catalog objects in their collections — sometimes this work suffers from a legacy of colonialism and discrimination in the way their collections are labeled and categorized. Some institutions are working to update these labels with more respectful terminology. Hear more from some of the changemakers working to update labels and metadata with more respectful terminologies during this CC panel.

CC’s Key Insights from WIPO’s Meeting on Copyright

Copyright, Open Heritage
A screenshot of the SCCR webcasting with Brigitte Vézina delivering a statement on behalf of Creative Commons. “WIPO SSCR Screenshot” by Creative Commons is licensed via CC BY 4.0.

From 6 to 8 November 2023, Creative Commons participated remotely in the 44th session of the World Intellectual Property Organization Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights. In this blog post, we look back on the session’s highlights on broadcasting, exceptions and limitations, and generative AI, from CC’s perspective.

CC Celebrates 20 Years of the UNESCO Convention on Safeguarding Intangible Heritage

Open Heritage
A colorful shyrdak, a type of rug, with geometric square and diamond patterns filled with spiraling and curvy abstract shapes in bright pink, red, navy, yellow, teal and light and dark blues. A shyrdaq on the floor of a Kyrgyz home in Kyzyl-Jar, Aqsy, Jalalabat”, Kyrgyzstan by Firespeaker, here cropped, is licensed via CC BY-SA 3.0.

CC celebrates the 20th anniversary of the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage. CC’s community initiative “Towards a Recommendation on Open Culture” (TAROC) is designed to support the international community in developing a positive, affirmative, and influential recommendation enshrining the values, objectives, and mechanisms for open culture to flourish and, in particular, for open culture to serve as a means to safeguard intangible cultural heritage.