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2007 October

5 Ways to Grow the Commons

Melissa Reeder, October 12th, 2007

Sarah Davies acknowledged her appreciation of our fundraising approach on her blog today, and I would like to take this opportunity to build upon what she said and to also say thank you.

In order to sustain Creative Commons, fundraising is vital – but raising awareness and educating the larger community is more so. We exist because of you and as the community grows – we have to grow. In order to meet your digital needs, means we have to ask for your help. We cannot raise the kind of global awareness and support needed on our own. We are a lean, grassroots operation and are honored to have such a supportive community.

As you all know (hopefully) we launched our 3rd annual fundraising campaign on Oct. 1st. But what probably most of you don’t know is that on the same day we sent out 2,500 letters to people that have given to CC before, asking them to re-invest in the future of CC. And now I’m asking the world.

Please help us celebrate the past 5 years of Creative Commons, and plant the seeds for another 5, by helping us grow the commons in 5 ways:

1. Use CC

2. Grow CC

3. Spread CC

  • Feature this online campaign on your blog or podcast to help us reach new audiences.
  • Send CC Staff your story of why you support CC so we can compile and share them with the world (CC licensed of course).

4. Connect CC

  • Introduce 5 new people to Creative Commons.

5. Sustain CC

  • By giving 50% more than your previous gift to this campaign, you will help us sustain CC’s core functioning for the next year.


Final sorting of campaign letters in CC’s San Francisco office; photo by Elaine Adolfo licensed under Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike.

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Screening of Good Copy Bad Copy in NYC (w/ Co-Director + MPAA Q&A Session)

Cameron Parkins, October 12th, 2007

This Tuesday, October 16th, Free Culture @ NYU will be hosting a screening of Good Copy Bad Copy, a fantastic documentary about copyright and culture, at the NYU Courant Institute, followed by a a question and answer session with the film’s award-winning Danish co-director, Henrik Moltke, and Fritz Attaway, the MPAA’s Executive VP and Special Policy Advisor.

This is an amazing opportunity to not only see a phenomenal film, but also to participate in a Q&A session that is bound to be both informative and provocative. If you are in the area make sure to check it out. Details below:

Good Copy Bad Copy Screening
Followed by Q&A with Co-Director Henrik Moltke and Fritz Attaway, MPAA

Tuesday, October 16th 2007
9:15pm – 11:15pm
NYU’s Courant Institute
251 Mercer Street b/w Bleecker and W. 4th
Room #109
Free and Open to the Public (bring ID if non-NYU)

Addendum: Check out Collage Clearinghouse’s recently posted review of the film:

If you have any interest in the future of our culture…If you are an artist who appropriates and who is working sometimes in fear…If you are a citizen who is forward thinking about our personal rights…this is a movie you must watch! And besides, it’s online and showing for free. Do yourself a favor and learn something.

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Support CC by Choosing Good

Melissa Reeder, October 12th, 2007

To all of you CC supporters in Los Angeles — there’s a happening party tonight that you should check out. Good Magazine is throwing a party at the Natural History Museum (details: Good comes back to LA) complete with an open bar and some awesome DJs.

The cover is the cost of a subscription ($20), which you can have donated to Creative Commons. This is the final week in which Creative Commons will be an official Choose Good Partner. Over the past year 1430 people have subscribed to Good Magazine and chose CC as the the organization they would like their subscription fee to benefit. So if your in the LA area and are looking for something to do tonight, I urge you to take advantage of this final opportunity to support Creative Commons through Good Magazine’s Choose Good Campaign.


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Fair Use Salon at LA Art Crawl X This Sunday (10/14)

Cameron Parkins, October 12th, 2007

This Sunday, October 12th 14th, I will be joining Jack Learner, Visiting Clinical Assistant Professor of Law and Acting Director at the USC Intellectual Property and Technology Law Clinic, for a discussion of fair use and the arts as part of Art Crawl X.

It will be taking place at the FoundLA Gallery in Silverlake (1903 Hyperion Ave., 90027) at 4PM. The ArtWalk in general promises to be quite the cultural explosion (look at the events page to find out more) and if you are in the area and interested in CC or Fair Use and the arts, you should definitely swing by.

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Creative Commons Licenses Launch in Greece

Michelle Thorne, October 12th, 2007

We are proud to announce the successful localization of the Creative Commons licenses in Greece. The porting of the licenses to Greek law was headed by Legal Project Leads Marinos Papadopoulos and Prodromos Tsiavos, with support from Public Project Lead Theodoros Karounos.

The launch will be celebrated on Saturday, October 13, at the Ceremonies Hall in the University of Athens, with a keynote address from Prof. Lawrence Lessig.

Press Release

Event on Yahoo! Upcoming


University of Athens, photo by yuankuei licensed under CC BY-NC-ND.

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Thank You Six Apart and Live Journal

Melissa Reeder, October 11th, 2007

Last night at the CC Salon in San Francisco, Six Apart presented CC with an impressive donation raised entirely by their LiveJournal community through sales of permanent accounts. Over 600 people bought permanent accounts and chose Creative Commons as a recipient of a portion of that sale.

CC CEO Lawrence Lessig was on hand to accept the check. He praised Six Apart for being one of the very first companies to build a CC license option into content creation software. Six Apart is also one of the first implementers of our licensing widget integration with Six Apart’s TypePad hosted blogging service was demoed at the Salon.

Thank you Six Apart!

This was a great way to really kick off our 3rd annual fundraising campaign — a truly community driven contribution! Please join Six Apart and the LiveJournal community in sustaining Creative Commons.

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Version 3.01 – Public Discussion Launched

Lawrence Lessig, October 11th, 2007

Hello CC Community,

I’m writing to tell you about an update we are proposing to our current version of our licenses (3.0). Because the update is intended simply to make clear something we intended the license to mean, this version would be numbered 3.01.

As you know, in February 2007, after 9 months of public comment, CC released version 3.0 of our licenses. Section 4(f) of those licenses (the “Unported” licenses; this does not apply to ported jurisdiction licenses) addressed the question of moral rights. It stated:

Except as otherwise agreed in writing by the Licensor or as may be otherwise permitted by applicable law, if You Reproduce, Distribute or Publicly Perform the Work either by itself or as part of any Adaptations or Collections, You must not distort, mutilate, modify or take other derogatory action in relation to the Work which would be prejudicial to the Original Author’s honor or reputation. Licensor agrees that in those jurisdictions (e.g. Japan), in which any exercise of the right granted in Section 3(b) of this License (the right to make Adaptations) would be deemed to be a distortion, mutilation, modification or other derogatory action prejudicial to the Original Author’s honor and reputation, the Licensor will waive or not assert, as appropriate, this Section, to the fullest extent permitted by the applicable national law, to enable You to reasonably exercise Your right under Section 3(b) of this License (right to make Adaptations) but not otherwise.

The intent of this clause, and the balance of the section it is located within, is essentially to leave moral rights untouched by our license. As the discussion about this change indicated, while many within our community would prefer a license that permitted creators to waive moral rights as they waive some of the exclusive rights granted by copyright, internationally, this is not a reliable posture for our licenses to take. In some jurisdictions, the act of purporting to waive moral rights might jeopardize the validity of the license. And in others, the rights can’t be waived at all.

Despite this intent, some — especially within the Wikipedia community — have read this clause to mean not that moral rights are untouched, but that moral rights are being enforced by the license. That was not our intent. Because this is an important point to have understood, we have therefore inserted a modification to Section 4(f) .

We have also integrated suggestions from jurisdiction partners including Japan to add clarity to the remainder of this section.

Hence, the new wording proposes the following modifications to section 4 (f):

Except as otherwise agreed in writing by the Licensor or as may be otherwise permitted by applicable law, ifOriginal Author, in those jurisdictions in which the moral right of integrity exists and by operation of local law constrains the freedom to adapt or collect licensed work, and You Reproduce, Distribute or Publicly Perform the Work either by itself or as part of any Adaptations or Collections, You must not distort, mutilate, modify or take other derogatory action in relation to the Work which would be prejudicial to the Original Author’s honor or reputation. Where the Licensor is the Original Author of the Work, the Licensor agrees that in those jurisdictions (e.g. Japan), in which any exercise of the right granted in Section 3(b) of this License (the right to make Adaptations) wcould be deemed to be a distortion, mutilation, modification or other derogatory action prejudicial toviolate the moral right of integrity of the Original Author‘s honor and reputation, the Licensor will waive or not assert, as appropriate, this Section, to the fullest extent permitted by the applicable national law, as long as You do not distort, mutilate, modify or take other derogatory action in relation to the Work which would be prejudicial to the Original Author’s honor or reputation, so as to enable You to reasonably exercise Your right under Section 3(b) of this License (right to make Adaptations), but not otherwise.

So that Section 4(f) in version 3.01 Unported licenses would read:

Except as otherwise agreed in writing by the Original Author, in those jurisdictions in which the moral right of integrity exists and by operation of local law constrains the freedom to adapt or collect licensed work, and You Reproduce, Distribute or Publicly Perform the Work either by itself or as part of any Adaptations or Collections, You must not distort, mutilate, modify or take other derogatory action in relation to the Work which would be prejudicial to the Original Author’s honor or reputation. Where the Licensor is the Original Author of the Work, the Licensor agrees that in those jurisdictions (e.g. Japan) in which any exercise of the right granted in Section 3(b) of this License (the right to make Adaptations) could violate the moral right of integrity of the Original Author, the Licensor will waive or not assert this Section, to the fullest extent permitted by the applicable national law, as long as You do not distort, mutilate, modify or take other derogatory action in relation to the Work which would be prejudicial to the Original Author’s honor or reputation, so as to enable You to reasonably exercise Your right under Section 3(b) of this License, but not otherwise.

We invite discussion about this clarification on our licenses list. And assuming the discussion doesn’t reveal any problems with the change, we hope to version in this small way soon.

We are all grateful to the help of the community in helping us to see this problem.

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GNOME in Boston, 2007

Asheesh Laroia, October 11th, 2007

We love to see Creative Commons metadata everywhere. Thanks to the work of Scott and Jason this summer, we now have a library called liblicense and some demos for how to integrate that with desktop applications in GNOME and KDE, the two most-used Free Software desktop environments.

So I went to the GNOME summit last weekend in Boston. Owen Taylor organized this meeting, mostly of developers who have been working on the core of GNOME or widely-used GNOME apps, but the group was very friendly to newcomers like me.

I gave a lightning talk on liblicense and our metadata in general. People asked great questions, ranging from, “Does any distribution ship this yet?” to “Can liblicense help users see which licenses are compatible?”. To mention a few presentations that stuck out in my mind, I saw talks on the famous Online Desktop, Lennart Poettering’s Mango Lassi, and a granular desktop privileges system called PolicyKit. Though I didn’t see a presentation, Hanna Wallach‘s work on pushing machine learning into the desktop struck me as being right on target. Debian, Novell, RedHat, OLPC, and other organizations were represented, and of course the people themselves were talkative and interesting. Later on, I was pleased to see that Owen recalled my interest in software freedom and RDFa.

While I was in town, I met with Harvard Free Culture at an OLPC listening party they were having. I also had dinner with developers of the Miro video player. I stayed with the generous Mako Hill. After years of knowing him on IRC, I finally met Matt Lee, the chief GNU webmaster. It was great seeing all these GNOME hackers and revisiting the rich Free Culture and Free Software communities in Boston.

By and large the attendees paid more attention to their laptops than to presentations. But at the wrap-up, everyone was alert when an attendee asked, “Shall we do this again next year?”. “Yes!”

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CC Salon SF Tonight

Rebecca Rojer, October 10th, 2007

Please join us tonight, Wednesday, October 10, for the San Francisco CC Salon. Stop by Shine (1337 Mission St.) from 7-9PM to help celebrate the launch of our fall fundraising campaign, hang out with fellow CC supporters, and learn about CC topics. Our presenters include:

Check out the upcoming page for more info. See you tonight!

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TempoStand: CC Music Platform

Cameron Parkins, October 8th, 2007

TempoStand is an online musical portal that promotes independent bands, artists, and musicians in India by using CC-licenses. TempoStand records tracks for groups and then releases these recordings under a CC-India BY-SA License, allowing people to remix and redistribute the tracks as they see fit. From TempoStand:

TempoStand is a platform to promote independent musicians in India. It is starting its journey from Ahmedabad from 15th April, 2007. Every musician, every singer, every rocker, every tabla wadak is invited. We record your music for free (no hidden costs) and use a creative commons license for your music. TempoStand’s objective is to promote you and take your music across the world.

As more and more musicians and record labels begin to use CC-licences to openly promote their content, we will likely see an influx of material that would otherwise not be nearly as visible. TempoStand has already amassed an incredible amount of quality recordings, and as they continue to add more content, the long-tail of digital music becomes more and more a reality.

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