Open Workspace and (c)opyme at Salons in Berlin

Michelle Thorne, April 21st, 2009

openeverything-cc-salon-berlin1

Another month, another topic to tackle at the CC Salon / Openeverything Berlin. This time we’ll be talking about Open Workspaces in emerging forms of coworking, collaboration, and office sharing.

Joining us:

Where:  newthinking store, Tucholskystr. 48, 10117 Berlin Mitte
When: Thurs, 23.04.09, 19:30


copyme

The following day we’ll be at Ballhaus Ost for a production of (c)opyme, a solo performance by artist Rahel Savoldelli. The theater piece, with its innovative uses of video, invites the audience into the complex world of creation and copyright laws, and asks: is it possible to feel satisfaction from someone else’s success?

A salon discussion will be held afterward to explore CC and “open source strategies” in the performing arts.

Where:  Ballhaus Ost, Pappelallee 15, Berlin Prenzlauerberg
When: Fri, 24.04.09, 20:00
Other (c)opyme performances: 23.04 and 25.04

Image: Gutestun / CC BY

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Boing Boing tv Archives Running CC Ads

Cameron Parkins, April 20th, 2009

Boing Boing tv, purveyors of all things awesome, recently began running short adverts for CC as bumpers for almost all the videos produced up until February of this year. Check out their video archives to see the spots in the wild, one of which is cut from Jesse Dylan’s A Shared Culture.

As noted previously, all Boing Boing tv episodes are released under a CC BY-NC license. A big thanks to the great people at Boing Boing and Boing Boing tv for making this happen!

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Braithwaite’s CC Licensed Wallets

Fred Benenson, April 20th, 2009

wallet
Braithwaite creates men’s wallets whose PDF designs are CC licensed. Their model really exemplifies the kind of thinking we’re seeing a lot of these days – set the digital versions free and offer the unique physical goods and experience for a price. Braithwaite explains their decision as follows:

As of April 14, 2009, we have used Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License to license our unique wallet designs allowing anyone to distribute, copy, or produce them as long as authorship credit is retained. The right to use our designs does include commercial use.

Since there are no ‘patents’ in regards to the fashion industry, we have decided to blow the lid off with our work by making it freely available to anyone. This also allows our designers to retain the rights to their work. When designers submit their work to us, we recommend that they first license it with Creative Commons to make sure their rights are protected.

You can download the wallet designs on the pages of their respective designers, and orders begin shipping April 22nd.

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Randall Munroe on XKCD’s Book & Creative Commons

Fred Benenson, April 20th, 2009

XKCD Excerpt
Today’s New York Times reports on XKCD cartoonist Randall Munroe‘s foray into IRL publishing, so we wanted take the opportunity to congratulate Randall for the book deal, but we also wanted to point out his typically pithy and brilliant perspective in the NYTimes article on the book’s copyright and his choice to use Creative Commons:

Does that mean that the book won’t carry a traditional copyright and instead take its lead from the online comic strip itself, which Mr. Munroe licenses under Creative Commons, allowing noncommercial re-use as long as credit is given?

“To anyone who wants to photocopy, bind, and give a copy of the book to their loved one — more power to them,” he said. “He/She will likely be disappointed that you’re so cheap, though.”

Randall’s award winning webcomic XKCD is updated frequently and released under our Attribution-NonCommercial license.

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Prospector Alliance reappropriates public domain materials

Jane Park, April 16th, 2009

One of the benefits of public domain books is that once they are scanned and made available on the Internet, they are then available for anyone, including other organizations, to use and reuse in other contexts and sites. The Prospector Alliance, the union catalog of Colorado Alliance Research Libraries, did exactly this by enhancing the bibliographic records of the University of Michigan’s giant collection of digitized public domain books. According to the press release,

“Library users in Colorado and Wyoming now have access to tens of thousands of additional open-access digitized books and serials through the Prospector Library Catalog (http://prospector.coalliance.org). The digitized items originate from the University of Michigan, a partner in the Google Books digitization project and a member of a consortium of libraries called Hathi Trust. Last year the University of Michigan made available bibliographic records for many of the out-of-copyright titles that Google digitized from its collections. The University then made available online files for each of the digitized works.

…Now library patrons from across Colorado have access to the online books via the Prospector catalog. Except for the University of Michigan where the books originated, the Auraria Library was the first library in the nation to make these books available to its users.”

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Student Journalism 2.0

Jane Park, April 16th, 2009

Never has it become more plainly evident that the old model of news reporting—reporting via professional print media to the people—is crumbling, as one by one newspapers across the country shut down. We can lament these long-standing institutions, wax poetic for the “good old days”, or we can actually do something about it.

The solution is not to throw money at the problem, because money doesn’t force people to read what they don’t want to. The solution is to engage actively with the new forms of media out there, and to explore why the web and “new” media are replacing print news. Where does it all start, and what are the advantages of web journalism?

The MacArthur Foundation in partnership with HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Science and Technology Advanced Collaboratory) has awarded $2 million to nineteen projects spanning the globe and innovations in digital media and learning. One of these projects is Student Journalism 2.0, spearheaded by ccLearn. From the competition website,

“For journalism students, the digital age requires more than hands-on reporting, writing, and publication of stories. Students must also embrace the capabilities of the Internet for virtual collaboration, viral dissemination, and feedback loops that inform and deepen original stories. All of these web-based opportunities depend on knowledge and proactive application of open content licensing, such as with Creative Commons, and appropriate metatags and technical formats. Student Journalism 2.0 engages high school students in understanding legal and technical issues intrinsic to new journalistic practices. The lessons learned during this pilot project will be documented in anticipation of a national-scale, follow-up project.”

ccLearn’s Executive Director, Ahrash Bissell, is currently accepting the grant in Chicago at the awards ceremony and the projects showcase of last year’s Digital Media and Learning Competition winners. The event runs through tomorrow, and you can read the full press release here.

We wrote the proposal sometime last year, got enmeshed in the daily grind of other projects and work, and forgot about it. Spring brought fantastic news, and we would like to give our greatest thanks to the MacArthur Foundation, HASTAC, and everyone else involved in making this possible. We will keep you posted as the project develops. For now, you can read the original project proposal at the ccLearn site, licensed CC BY, of course.

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Norwegian Minister Publishes Book under CC BY-SA

Michelle Thorne, April 16th, 2009

delte meningerFrom CC Norway:

Today, Norway’s Minister of Government Administration and Reform, Heidi Grande Røys, launched a new book, edited by the Minister, about sharing and the social side of computer networks.  The book is titled “Delte  meninger” (in Norwegian this has the dual meaning of “shared  opinions” and “conflicting opinions”). There is also a website dedicated to open, public debate about the issues raised in the book.

Both the website and the print edition will carry a ported Norwegian CC BY-SA 3.0 license.

The print edition of the book will be published by Universitetsforlaget and is the first instance of a major book in Norway that carries a Creative Commons license.

Delte meninger / CC BY-SA 3.0

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Second Round of the Noncommercial Use Study — “User” Questionnaire Launched

Mike Linksvayer, April 15th, 2009

Creative Commons is launching the second and final round of a survey intended to collect information on how people understand the term “noncommercial use”. As previously announced, this study is funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and we are fortunate to have the help of a distinguished group of advisors and colleagues.

During the first phase of the study, which took place last fall, we focused on talking with and surveying creators, using a questionnaire that was fielded to a sample of US-based content creators, and also made available (in an expanded version) to anyone interested. See 1, 2, 3.

Now we want to hear about noncommercial use from the user’s perspective — recognizing of course that the creator/user distinction is itself worthy of study! Whether you consider yourself a member of the Creative Commons community, or are interested more generally in copyright, we hope you will respond. While answering all the questions can take a while, particularly if you have a lot to say, many people who participated last time found it an interesting and useful experience.

Note that we could not incorporate as many suggestions from the previous questionnaire (see comments on posts linked above) as we would have liked due to the structure of the study — we want to be able to compare data from the two phases of research, and to be able to do that, we have to retain the wording of certain concepts and questions.

While to our knowledge this is the first empirical research project to tackle understanding how people define “noncommercial use”, we hope it is only the first of many efforts to explore the many dimensions of the subject. We will release the raw empirical data collected and some early reports from the first (creator) questionnaire next week, and will release a report on the full study and all data this summer. We hope others will be able to mine and build on this data.

If you’ve read this far, we know you have an opinion, and we hope you understand that we’re trying to provide a way for you to share that opinion. What are your views? Please help us make the data set as robust as possible! Take the questionnaire (allow 15-25 minutes), and help us tell others about it.

Questions about the study or this poll may be sent to noncommercial@creativecommons.org.

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Czech Creators Celebrate Local Creative Commons Licenses

Michelle Thorne, April 15th, 2009

czech-flagCreators can now publish and share their creative works using CC’s free tools adapted to Czech language and law. CC Czech will be throwing an event to celebrate the launch in Prague’s DigiLab AVU on April 16 during the Multiplace festival.

CC Czech has gathered a lot of supporters since its inception last year. Besides the project’s institutional hosts, Iuridicum remedium, the National Library in the Czech Republic, and the Union of Independent Authors, CC Czech has also received endorsement from the Copyright Department of the Ministry of Culture and Faculty of Philosophy and Arts, Charles University of Prague. The team reports:

The joint forces of lawyers, librarians, musicians, teachers, artists, geeks, journalists and other specialists delivered not only what we were aiming for – the localized CC deeds and legal codes – but also proof that the ideas behind CC echo in many areas both professional and amateur. From archiving original Czech web content, to educational materials, to works from independent music producers and performers, CC opens up a wide spectrum of possibilities. There is no doubt the today’s launch is only the beginning of the Czech Creative Commons story.

Our congratulations and gratitude to CC Czech Project Leads Marek Tichy, Lukáš Gruber, and Petr Jansa for their efforts in consulting with Czech creators and legal experts to adapt CC’s licenses and tools. The launch marks the fifty-second jurisdiction worldwide to offer localized Creative Commons licenses.

Read more in our press release.

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New Education Program Assistant

Jane Park, April 14th, 2009

Welcome to Alex Kozak, our new Education Program Assistant! Alex will be graduating from the University of California, Berkeley next month, with a BA in Philosophy. (That makes three former Philosophy majors at ccLearn.)

In this economy, it was no surprise that we had access to a great pool of highly-qualified candidates. Thanks to everyone who submitted an application, especially to those who were patient during the interview process. We were inspired by the number of committed persons in and outside of open education, and we are positive that all of them will move on to effectively fill positions relevant to their interests.

Please be in touch for future opportunities and news about the movement in general.

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