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Author: Jocelyn Miyara

Recap & Recording: Maximizing the Value(s) of Open Access in Cultural Heritage Institutions

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Four barrels full of cash printed in black, green and red are overflowing. The text in front reads “Maximizing the Value(s) of Open Access in Cultural Heritage Institutions: 28 February 2024 | 2:00 PM UTC”. Barrels of Money” by Victor Dubreuil. 1890s. Brandywine Museum of Art , Public Domain.

In February, we hosted a webinar in our Open Culture Live series titled “Maximizing the Value(s) of Open Access in Cultural Heritage Institutions.” In this blog post, we summarize the key points raised in the discussion and share a link to the recording.

Recap & Recording: “Whose Open Culture? Decolonization, Indigenization, and Restitution”

Open Culture
The background is a woven textile with black, red, blue, and brown and tan shapes emmulating birds and fish. The text reads Andean Textile Fragment” by Peruvian. 1500. Walters Art Museum., here slightly cropped, is released into the public domain under CC0.

In January we hosted a webinar titled “Whose Open Culture? Decolonization, Indigenization, and Restitution” discussing the intersection of indigenous knowledge and open sharing. Our conversation spanned a variety of topics regarding indigenous sovereignty over culture, respectful terminology, and the legacy of colonialism and how it still exists today.

Upcoming Open Culture Live Webinar: “Whose Open Culture? Decolonization, Indigenization, and Restitution”

Open Culture
The background is a woven textile with black, red, blue, and brown and tan shapes emmulating birds and fish. The text reads Andean Textile Fragment” by Peruvian. 1500. Walters Art Museum., here slightly cropped, is released into the public domain under CC0.

On Wednesday, 17 January, 2024, at 3:00 pm UTC, CC’s Open Culture Program will be hosting a new webinar in our Open Culture Live series titled “Whose Open Culture? Decolonization, Indigenization, and Restitution.” As we observed a few years ago, there is growing awareness in the open culture movement about issues related to the acquisition, preservation, access, sharing, and reuse of cultural heritage of Indigenous peoples and local communities (including traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions), heritage in the context of colonization, and culturally-sensitive heritage.

Celebrate Public Domain Day 2024 with us: Weird Tales from the Public Domain

Copyright
A clipped image with Original art by illustrator Freya C. Morgan”. Internet Archive.

Join Creative Commons, Internet Archive, and many other leaders from the open world to celebrate Public Domain Day 2024. The mouse that became Mickey will finally be free of his corporate captivity as the copyright term of the 1928 animated Disney film, Steamboat Willie, expires along with that of thousands of other cultural works on…

Open Culture Live Recap & Recording: Respectful Terminologies & Changing the Subject

Open Culture
A detail from the painting showing a scene of Indian princesses gathered around a fountain with multi-colored dresses, overlaid with the CC Open Culture logo and Open Culture Live wordmark, and text saying “Changing the Subject & Respectful Technologies 29 November 2023 | 4:00 PM UTC” and including an attribution for the image: “Princesses Gather at a Fountain, ca. 1770 Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art.” Princesses Gather at Fountain”, ca. 1770, shown slightly cropped. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Public Domain.

On 22 November, we organized a webinar with a group of experts to discuss their unique approaches to reparative metadata practices: considering the ways that harmful histories and terminologies have made their way into collections labeling and categorization practices and finding ways to identify those terms, contextualize them, and/or replace them altogether. Jill Baron, a…

Highlights from GLAM Wiki by the CC Open Culture Team

Open Culture
From left to right, the team stands together with GLAM Wiki Lanyards. Jocelyn has short brown curly hair and wears a black and white dress with a black shirt. Brigitte has light brown hair and wears jeans and a pink jacket. Connor wears a white button up shirt and jeans, glasses. Jennryn has long blonde hair and colorful hoop earrings with a CC t-shirt. The team is featured in front of an ornate door and checkered black and white tiled floor. Picture of the Creative Commons team at GLAM Wiki, Montevideo, Uruguay, 17 November, 2023. From left to right: Jocelyn Miyara, Brigitte Vézina, Connor Benedict, and Jennryn Wetzler. © Creative Commons, licensed CC-BY.

From 16 to 18 November, members of the Creative Commons (CC) Open Culture and Learning and Training teams attended GLAM Wiki in Montevideo Uruguay. In this blog post we look back at the event’s highlights from CC’s perspective.

Open Culture Live Webinar: Changing the Subject & Respectful Terminologies

Open Culture
A detail from the painting showing a scene of Indian princesses gathered around a fountain with multi-colored dresses, overlaid with the CC Open Culture logo and Open Culture Live wordmark, and text saying “Changing the Subject & Respectful Technologies 29 November 2023 | 4:00 PM UTC” and including an attribution for the image: “Princesses Gather at a Fountain, ca. 1770 Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art.” Princesses Gather at Fountain”, ca. 1770, shown slightly cropped. The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Public Domain.

For centuries, cultural heritage institutions have been undertaking the work to document and catalog objects in their collections — sometimes this work suffers from a legacy of colonialism and discrimination in the way their collections are labeled and categorized. Some institutions are working to update these labels with more respectful terminology. Hear more from some of the changemakers working to update labels and metadata with more respectful terminologies during this CC panel.