CC BY-NC-ND

Steve Trash Gets “Kids Making Better Choices” to Alabama Primary Schools

Cameron Parkins, September 19th, 2008

Steve Trash is a kids entertainer, environmentalist, and acclaimed magician who recently released a collection of video shorts, Kids Making Better Choices, that helps teach young children about recycling, exercise, and how to “make better choices.”

Steve releases his videos online under a CC BY-NC-ND license, allowing the videos to be shared and used widely. Most recently, in conjunction with Alabama’s State Legislature, Steve sent 1200 CC-licensed DVDs containing his videos to Alabama primary schools for classroom use. He also released supplemental material online to assist in the teaching of his works.

No Comments »

Late yet great news — Photosynth launches with CC support

Mike Linksvayer, September 16th, 2008

Last year you probably saw a video demo of Photosynth at TED, and forwarded and/or were forwarded the video many times (the video is even licensed under CC BY-NC-ND, like all TED videos). Lots of people forwarded it to me anyway — I apparently do something with computers :) and Photosynth is computer technology anyone can immediately connect with — it “synths” or stitches together collections of photos, creating a model one can navigate as if one were “there” — the demo video includes an incredible model of the Notre Dame cathedral in Paris, created from many normal photos.

Obviously this technology creates a whole new way to relate to photography, one that treats photos more as data that contributes to a model than as individual creative works. How should such ‘data’ and works rendered from the same be restricted? No doubt such questions will become increasingly relevant — Photosynth hints at futuristic new mediums and interfaces that massive and expected increases in storage, compute power, and sensor ubiquity will bring.

Photosynth opened to the public late last month, and it is great that Microsoft chose to encourage synthers to release their work under a CC license (see screenshot at end of this post). ReadWriteWeb and the Seattle Times were two of many publications to note the Creative Commons feature in Photosynth.

Below is a screenshot of my first attempted synth, composed of 98 photos taken from the windows of the CC office in San Francisco. Although one could do better with more experience or simply more photos, a screenshot really doesn’t do justice at all to this or any synth — click on the image to navigate around. Unfortunately this currently requires a plugin only available on Windows XP or Vista.

cc-sf-office-photosynth-shot

For anyone who wants to create a bigger or better synth, I’ve uploaded the original 98 photos to the Internet Archive and placed them in the public domain.


Synth creation window, showing CC license recommendation and selection.

A completely different part of Microsoft has also just announced CC licensing — the Microsoft Operations Framework 4.0, an IT guidebook and worksheet, is now released under CC BY. The MOF blog has a nice rationale:

One of the first things people realize when looking at implementing a service management framework, whether it is ITIL, MOF, or another, is that they must not only be adopted but also adapted to your individual organization’s needs.  You have to decide which of the described processes are relevant to your requirements and to what depth to apply them.  this is true whether you are a consultant trying to make a living assisting others in their implementations, or a IT Manager trying to decide how improve upon your organization’s existing change control.

MOF 4.0 now fully supports this need for flexibility and the ability to remix, adapt, and shuffle the content with the adoption of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license. This license allows you to freely Share (copy, distribute, or transmit) any of the MOF content and Remix (adapt) that content to suit your needs.  For a full legal explanation of the terms of the license, please refer to the Creative Commons website.

No Comments »

Indaba Music Team Up With Third Eye Blind

Cameron Parkins, September 16th, 2008

Exciting news from Indaba Music – alternative rock band Third Eye Blind have teamed up with the former Featured Commoner to offer fans of the band, and Indaba members, increased interaction with the band’s music and writing process. 3EB will posting unfinished song stems to the community site, allowing members to take the stems, reuse/remix them, and post them as CC BY-NC-ND licensed reworkings (somewhat similar to our Copyright Criminals contest).

To be clear the 3EB tracks are not CC-licensed, but CC licenses will allow Indaba members the ability to spread their creations in a non-commercial setting and experiment with 3EB’s material before it is released. Similarly, 3EB gains a means to collaborate with their fans in a way that is unique and more personal. The best material resulting from this collaboration will go on a companion album to be released alongside the band’s album sometime next year. From Indaba:

Here’s the deal. As 3EB finishes laying down tracks, the band will post unmixed instrument stems for you to tweak, shape, and edit through a series of contests. They want to hear your vision for their songs. The first track, “Non-Dairy Creamer,” is already available for you to work on!

Through a regular blog that chronicles their experience of creating an album, access to the unmixed stems and the dialogue among Indaba members, you’ll have the chance to watch the group develop their artistic concept.

1 Comment »

Monk Turner Releases New Album Love Story

Cameron Parkins, September 16th, 2008

LA-based multi-instrumentalist and former Featured Commoner Monk Turner released his latest album, Love Story, a little under a week ago for free download on archive.org. The album is released under a CC BY-NC-ND license, making it his fifth album released in this vein, his second this year, and twentieth overall. From Monk Turner:

I wasn’t planning on making another concept album after I recorded my first one. But, somehow 20 albums later here we are. Being that this was going to be the 20th, I wanted to do something special and go beyond making just another album. About three years ago, a friend suggested I write an album of romantic love songs instead of the usual love dilemmas I tend to write about. While this idea excited me, I wanted a 3rd dimension and I thought this would be a great opportunity to take the idea of ‘concept art’ to the next level by including conceptual visual art. After a long search I found Junji Lee as a visual artist who suggested the love songs follow the Buddhist path to enlightenment or 10 Bulls. In typical fashion, the whole album was written in just under 2 weeks and demos were sent out for critique.

No Comments »

Common Craft

Cameron Parkins, September 15th, 2008

Common Craft is a company that makes videos which are “short, simple and focused on making complex ideas easy to understand.” These videos range in topic – from Twitter to social bookmarking to electing the U.S. President – and are made using a technique Common Craft calls Paperworks, a whiteboard-and-paper format that they believe “is designed to cut out the noise and stick to what matters.”

Common Craft make their videos available online for businesses to license as educational tools, but also share the videos widely under a CC BY-NC-ND license. There are definite advantages for businesses in getting the licensed versions, most notably portability and quality. Outside of this, the CC licensed Common Craft videos have garnered heightened popularity on YouTube and other sharing sites, increasing their name recognition and ubiquity – two factors that have hopefully been instrumental in expanding their growing list of custom-video clients. Common Craft have a great video posted on their licensing process that explains it all clearly and simply – making it not only informative but also a great example of their production style.

No Comments »


Page 5 of 512345

Subscribe to RSS

Archives

  • collapse2014
  • expand2013
  • expand2012
  • expand2011
  • expand2010
  • expand2009
  • expand2008
  • expand2007
  • expand2006
  • expand2005
  • expand2004
  • expand2003
  • expand2002