New Dutch government portal uses CC0 public domain waiver as default copyright status

The Netherlands government has launched Rijksoverheid.nl, a new website that all Dutch ministries will migrate to (English; other links in this post are Dutch). Creative Commons Netherlands notes that the site’s copyright policy signals a seriousness about open sharing of public sector information — its default is to remove all copyright restrictions with the CC0 … Read More “New Dutch government portal uses CC0 public domain waiver as default copyright status”

Public Domain Day 2010 and Beyond

Creative Commons has been celebrating Public Domain Day – January 1st – for several years, alongside many others who are similarly passionate about the value of the public domain and the need to prevent its demise. Each year on this day, copyright protection expires for millions of creative works, allowing those works to be used, repurposed … Read More “Public Domain Day 2010 and Beyond”

Does your sharing scale?

Hannes Grobe / CC BY-SA Techdirt’s Mike Masnick is perhaps the most prolific blogger on the ill impact of overly restrictive legal regimes, including of course copyright and patents, but also trademark and even employment law (see Noncompete Agreements Are The DRM Of Human Capital) and often on people delivering real value to customers (sad … Read More “Does your sharing scale?”

NY State Senate Goes CC

If you’re reading the Creative Commons blog, chances are you’re aware of the fact that the United States federal government is not entitled to copyright protection for their works. If you didn’t know this, check out the Wikipedia article on the subject, or some of our past blog posts on the subject. This means that … Read More “NY State Senate Goes CC”

Public (UK) perception of copyright, public sector information, and CC

The UK Office of Public Sector Information has published a report on public understanding of copyright, in particular Crown Copyright, the default status of UK government works … and Creative Commons. It contains interesting findings, though I really wish it had included two additional questions. Among the general (UK) public, 71% agree that government should … Read More “Public (UK) perception of copyright, public sector information, and CC”