CC BY-NC-ND

“Creative Commons Movement Steps Up” in Malaysia

Michelle Thorne, April 9th, 2009

here-in-my-home

CC Malaysia Board Member Muid Latif writes to us about his team’s recent press coverage and community outreach. For one, The Star, the largest newspaper in circulation in Malaysia, interviewed CC MY in an extensive article “Creative Commons movement steps up”. It features, among others, the team’s proud achievement “Here in my home”,  a CC-licensed video shot last year in Kuala Lampur with Malaysian Artistes For Unity.

“Given the ‘viral’ nature of the project, it was important that we legalised free downloads and ­subsequent dissemination of the song and video,” [the song's composer Pete Teo] said.

“CC allowed us to do this without going to lawyers and drafting expensive and verbose traditional licences, every time someone wanted permission to use the song or video in their projects,” said Teo.

Fifty two people were involved in the project, including filmmakers, ­dancers, singers, producers, musicians, actors, ­entrepreneurs, designers, ­footballers, activists, celebrities and students.

CC Malaysia has also been busy putting on a workshop during the Kuala Lumpur Design Week to teach artists how to find, use, and create CC-licensed works. The team curates a Flickr group, called MyCC, which hosts monthly “Best CC Work” contests and other meet-ups.

Screenshot from “Here in my home” by Malaysian Artistes For Unity / CC NC ND 3.0.

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The Magnes Collection

Fred Benenson, March 25th, 2009

Turkish Dress2The Judah L. Magnes museum is a museum of art and history focused on the Jewish experience located in Berkeley, California. Since late 2007 the museum has been posting their digital assets both on their website and on their Flickr account. On Flickr, all of the high resolution images are licensed under our Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives license. The image to the left is of a 19th century Turkish Wedding dress which was a gift from Sara Levi Willis.

Recently, the museum has been blogging at their opensource blog, but you can also check out all of their collections on their Flickr account here. As more and more cultural institutions come online, it is important to recognize those that understand the value in sharing their assets, so congratulations to The Magnes for taking the lead!

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Creative Commons wins the 2008 Free Software Foundation Award for Project of Social Benefit!

Mike Linksvayer, March 24th, 2009

Saturday at Libre Planet, the Free Software Foundation’s annual conference, Creative Commons was honored to receive the FSF’s Award for Projects of Social Benefit:

The FSF Award for Projects of Social Benefit is presented annually to a project that intentionally and significantly benefits society by applying free software, or the ideas of the free software movement, in a project that intentionally and significantly benefits society in other aspects of life.

Since its launch in 2001, Creative Commons has worked to foster a growing body of creative, educational and scientific works that can be shared and built upon by others. Creative Commons has also worked to raise awareness of the harm inflicted by increasingly restrictive copyright regimes.

Creative Commons vice president Mike Linksvayer accepted the award saying, “It’s an incredible honor. Creative Commons should be giving an award to the Free Software Foundation and Richard Stallman, because what Creative Commons is doing would not be possible without them.”

Congratulations also to Wietse Venema, honored with the Award for the Advancement of Free Software for his “significant and wide-ranging technical contributions to network security, and his creation of the Postfix email server.”

FSF president Stallman presented a plaque by artist Lincoln Read commemorating the award to Creative Commons.

It is worth noting that the FSF Social Benefit Award’s 2005 and 2007 winners are Wikipedia and Groklaw both because it is tremendous to be in their company and as the former is in the process of migrating to a CC BY-SA license (thanks in large part to the FSF) and the latter publishes under a CC BY-NC-ND license.

Only last December CC was honored to receive an award from another of computing’s most significant pioneers, Doug Engelbart.

Thanks again to the Free Software Foundation and Richard Stallman. Please join us in continuing to celebrate the 25th anniversary of his founding of the free software movement. As Stallman would say, “Happy Hacking!”

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Brooklyn Museum’s API

Fred Benenson, March 6th, 2009

Brooklyn Museum In case it weren’t evidenced by their participation in Wikipedia Loves Art, The Brooklyn Museum is an institution that simply “gets it.On Tuesday, they launched an API.

The Brooklyn Museum Collection API consists of a set of methods that return structured data and links to images from the museum’s collections. This is particularly exciting since all of the images owned by Brooklyn Museum are licensed under our Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerviatives license.

To get an idea of what can be created based on their API take a look at this clever example of an interactive time line of objects in the catalog ranging from 4010 B.C.E. to now.

Piotr Adamczyk has already created a simple set of Yahoo! Pipes that allow anyone to execute the basic API functions without having to write their own code.

Keep up the great work Brooklyn Museum!

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The Pursuit of Efficient Copyright Licensing

Mike Linksvayer, February 16th, 2009

Herkko Hietanen, project lead for CC Finland, has made his 320 page dissertation available online under the CC BY-NC-ND license, titled The Pursuit of Efficient Copyright Licensing — How Some Rights Reserved Attempts to Solve the Problems of All Rights Reserved:

The dissertation contributes to the existing literature in several ways. There is a wide range of prior research on open source licensing. However, there is an urgent need for an extensive study of the Creative Commons licensing and its actual and potential impact on the creative ecosystem.

Indeed! Congratulations to Herkko, and may his book inspire more such research.

dsc05168.jpg
Herkko Hietanen at the 2008 Nordic Cultural Commons Conference (slide in the background is a graph of some jurisdiction’s copyright law) / CC BY

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Sundman returns

Mike Linksvayer, December 16th, 2008

John Sundman has published his third gonzo SF novel, The Pains, under a CC BY-NC-ND license. As usual when it comes to CC-licensed SF, Cory Doctorow has more on the story over at Boing Boing.

We published an interview with Sundman about his use of CC licenses back in 2006.

You can download, buy, or donate in support of all three of Sundman’s novels on his wetmachine.com site.

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Blue Orange Records releases “Come Tomorrow”, CC-licensed Electro/Indie-Pop Compilation

Cameron Parkins, December 10th, 2008

Blue Orange Records, a net-label that aims to “provide a portal for quality Indie Pop bands to connect with a global community of Indie Pop fans”, recently released Come Tomorrow, a compilation of songs by some very talented electro/indie-pop acts. The disc is released under a CC BY-NC-ND license to encourage sharing and is available for free online. From BOR:

A bit of background on the project–we spent 2008 listening to music from all over the world to find the best new electro indie-pop sounds. Included you will hear from Kiesgroup (DE) featuring Stereolab’s Laetitia Sadier performing in the song Punishment, Lucy and the Popsonics (BR) with their Brazilian electropop Garota Rock Ingles, not to mention our local favorite, Potion (US) with their Film Noir titles collage in Band of Outsiders as well as many other new artists ready to make you dance and smile. So let the sunshine in over these looming dark clouds of recession and download this compilation for free thanks to these wonderful artists and the Creative Commons License.

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Eighth Annual Media That Matters Film Festival DVDs on Sale

Fred Benenson, November 25th, 2008

The Media that Matters 8th Annual Festival DVDs have officially gone on sale. There are a number of facts that make these DVDs exceptional in the festival and documentary world:

If you’re interested in submitting your work to the 9th Annual Media that Matters Film Festival, check out their submission page here. Either way, consider buying a DVD today!

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Democracy Now! – now under a Creative Commons license

Eric Steuer, November 19th, 2008

We just received some tremendously exciting news. Democracy Now! – the daily news program broadcast by hundreds of radio and television stations around the world (it’s also the source of a very popular podcast) – is now being offered under a Creative Commons BY-NC-ND license. This includes not only new episodes, but also those in the show’s archive, dating back to the program’s beginnings in 1996. The show, hosted by journalists Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez, and originally created by Pacifica Radio (which has continued to provide critical support for the program since it became an independent production), is funded by listeners, viewers, and foundations who believe in independent media – an approach to doing things that we here at CC wholeheartedly respect (visit our fundraising drive for more on this). Democracy Now! was founded to report on issues and stories that the producers believe are underreported by mainstream news outlets. The program’s new usage terms are made clear via a Creative Commons license notice at the bottom of each episode’s page (see today’s conversation with Cornel West for an example).

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Ozmo launches with CC+ protocol support

Eric Steuer, November 18th, 2008

Copyright Clearance Center has just launched Ozmo, a new web-based service focused on helping photographers, bloggers, and other content creators license their work for commercial use. Ozmo supports Creative Commons’ CC+ protocol (see the press release about CC+ for more information), meaning that it enables creators to license their work to the public under one set of terms via a Creative Commons license, and offer the ability to obtain a private license via Ozmo’s licensing system — to purchase rights not offered by the CC license a work is under (e.g., commercial use if the work is under a CC NonCommercial license, the right to make an adaptation and not share under the same license if the work is under a CC ShareAlike license, or the right to use without attribution), or simply to obtain a private agreement with the copyright holder for situations that require such.

To use Ozmo, a creator sets up an account, selects license terms, and sets a price for the use of their work. Ozmo then works as a broker to companies, publishers, and bloggers who are looking to use work commercially. Ozmo manages the licensing process and pays creators when a license to their content is purchased. You can find more details about how Ozmo works on the site’s About page.

Artist, animator, and filmmaker Ryan Junell (who is the designer behind the Creative Commons logo, as well as several of CC’s explanatory videos – see “Get Creative,” “Wanna Work Together?” and “Reticulum Rex”) worked with musician J Lesser to create a short video that explains how Ozmo works. It’s licensed under CC BY-NC-ND.

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